Approximately 20 years after the events depicted in Deus Ex, The World is only beginning to recover from a Catastrophic worldwide depression. In the Chaotic period of recovery, several religious and political factions see an opportunity to re-shape a worldwide government to their agendas, understanding that the right moves now could...
Análises de utilizadores: Neutras (296 análises)
Data de lançamento: 5 Mar, 2004

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The Deus Ex Collection includes the complete library of Deus Ex titles ever released for PC, including the Game of the Year Edition of the original masterpiece, as well as the Director's Cut version of the applauded Deus Ex: Human Revolution.

 

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Approximately 20 years after the events depicted in Deus Ex, The World is only beginning to recover from a Catastrophic worldwide depression. In the Chaotic period of recovery, several religious and political factions see an opportunity to re-shape a worldwide government to their agendas, understanding that the right moves now could determine the shape of human society for decades — even centuries — to come. In this techno-nightmare, take part in the dark struggle to raise the world from its own ashes.

  • Dynamic and innovative 1st person-action/adventure brings a level of reality unprecedented in a videogame.
  • Biotech modifications allow players to see through walls, leap 40 feet into the air, regenerate critical body damage or render yourself radar invisible.
  • Globe-hop to real world locations such as Seattle, Antarctica, and Cairo.
  • Cunning stealth gameplay, with darkness and sound affecting enemy awareness.
  • Variable gameplay offers multiple solutions to problems and support for varying stylistic approaches.
  • Non-lethal, non-violent resolution to conflict, allowing players to make ethical statements through their actions.
  • The player's progress through the game is supported by an unprecedented freedom of action by a dynamic, non-linear story with responsive plot branches.

Requisitos do Sistema

    Minimum:

    • IBM PC or 100% compatible
    • Microsoft Windows 2000/XP
    • Pentium IV, 1.3GHz (Or AMD Athlon XP equivalent) processor
    • 100% DirectX 9 32MB 3D Accelerated video card with Pixel Shader v1.1 Capability
    • 256 MB System RAM
    • 100% DirectX 9 Compatible Sound Card
    • 2GB free uncompressed hard drive space (additional space may be necessary for saved games)
    • 100% Windows 2000/XP compatible Mouse and Keyboard
    • Recommended:

      • Pentium IV, 1.5 Ghz (or AMD Athlon XPequivalent) or greater processor
      • 512 MB System RAM
      • 100% DirectX 9 128MB 3D Graphics Card
      • 2GB of Hard Drive Space

      Supported Video Chipsets:
      nVidia GeForce 3Ti/4Ti/FX - Note: GeForce MX series is NOT SUPPORTED. ATI Radeon 8500/9xxx or higher.

Análises úteis de clientes
227 de 331 pessoas (69%) acharam esta análise útil
0.1 hrs em registo
This game should be reported for false advertising. The war was clearly in plain view.
Publicada: 25 Maio
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18 de 20 pessoas (90%) acharam esta análise útil
5.4 hrs em registo
This game is... interesting. So interesting, in fact, that I would recomend playing the original game, skipping this title completely, and then playing Human Revolution. Anyway, if you care about my opinion, read on! Otherwise, I hope you have a nice day anyway.

As far as ambiance goes it is reminiscent of the original game. The dark and oppressive cityscape, the futuristic techno music, the neo-noir use of shadows and, of course, the color blue.

The one improvement this game has over it's predecesor is the ragdoll mechanic. Stuffing the limp bodies of victims into the ventillation grates is more entertaining than the story itself.

This, of course, leads into the story. I played this game for about five and a half hours. In that amount of time in the first game, I stopped numerous political terrorist plots, took out some nasty drug dealers, saved a girl from a pimp and many, many other things. I definitely felt like I was making a positive difference in the world.
In the first five hours of this game, I escaped from a bizarre super-soldier training prison that was under attack from generic religous terrorists and then wandered around for a while fighting mercenaries, killing random gang members, discovering the the terrorists were purposefully religously generic, cheated in some illeagel gambling, burglarized some rich dude's apartment, and wrecked a coffee shop. I felt like a roving psychopath.

In the first game, I felt torn between the urgency of completing the story missions and helping people by completing the side quests.
In this game I felt like there was something I was supposed to be doing, but I had no idea what that thing was or if it even mattered.

The first game eventually gives you a sense of moral ambiguity; over time you learn more and more about all the factions competing with each other and learn that every side does varying amounts of honorable as well as evil actions. Aligning with a certain side doesn't make you feel any better than the other side, but you just feel like you need to go with the lesser evil in order to save humanity.
This game gives you an immediate feeling of moral ambivolence. You discover within the first hour that every faction you've encountered has a mixture of good and bad intentions which culminate in stupidity. There is no urgency. These people are just going to fight amongst each other for ambiguous reasons and they want to draw you into it all. At that point I figured I'd just go and see if there was anything remotely interesting happening elsewhere. Cheat in some underground mutant lizard fighting betting? Why not. Get involved in a feud between rival coffee chains? Sure! It's more interesting than helping the Orwellian police force fight some self righteous murderers.

Last and perhaps least, we have the player character. In the first game, you get to be the badass JC. Do you think his baggy coat is unnecessary and it's ridiculous that he wears sunglasses at night? He could not care less about your opinion. If you order him to do something he thinks is questionable, he will not blindly follow your orders. He will do what he thinks is right, and he will go about it however he wants. Playing as him, you feel like an awesome futuristic warrior as you gradually upgrade his nanotech and acquire new and better equipment.
In this game, you are Alex. His/her character was not developed at all in the time that I played. All in all, (s)he pretty much just lets the different factions tell him/her what to do with very little (if any) question or objection. Truely, a compelling character. Playing as this wimp, you get a bunch of weapons and upgrades almost immediately and not much of anything to do with them.

This game is not technically good. It is not even that fun. As an experience, it's a mediocre spiral into the depths of a deranged world. The prequel is amazing, and the first game is a masterpiece. This sequel is ultimately disappointing. It is basically just one of the many Godfather 3's of the game industry.

This is all, of course, just my opinion and I sincerely thank you for reading it. I hope it was helpful. Have a nice day!
Publicada: 27 Setembro
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27 de 38 pessoas (71%) acharam esta análise útil
35.0 hrs em registo
Invisible War is a decent fps rpg, when you consider how rare those actually are. It unfortunately distills what made it's predecessor great down into mediocre banality. Where computer skill would allow you to sift through people's personal emails in it's predecessor, learning important information, here you only need click on the computer with a hologram of a rotating letter above it - an insulting symptom of dumbing down of the core game mechanics into big signs that the dumbest of people can see, understand and use.

In fact, gone are the experience points and skill leveling of the first game entirely. Instead, the only leveling to be done is by biomod cannisters which add and improve abilities (strength, stealth, hacking, etc.) but is so uninteresting and rote in it's implementation that I wish it didn't even bother. Any "skill" you choose to apply in excludes some others from consideration, but they max out at 3 cannisters each, leading you with a load of unusable biomod cannisters at the end of the game. Unless you choose to experiment with another "skill" which you won't, because most of them kinda suck anyway.

Weapon modification is worse, because you can only add 2 mods to any weapon and some weapons can't be modded at all, so again, you'll have plenty of weapon mods you can't use. It's almost pathetically comical that characters give you biomods and weapon mods as rewards in the last several hours of game when you've already settled into the biomod "skills" and weaponry of choice and have modded them all out already.

The story is mostly a rehash with some of the same characters returning for what amounts to the same end game: control of a technology for world domination, or freedom, depending on your point of view. The character conversations are sometimes so insipid I just skipped through them, and most of the choices involve either a "yes" or "no" style answer which has no impact on the actual story, because at the end of the game the ending you get is determined, literally, by which button you decide to press.

I just played through it a second time, completely forgetting I had played through it previously, because the visual tone of the game is so bland, and the endings so bad. It's 90% values of blue and gray. Beginning of the game you're in a lab, then you're in a city, then you're in another city, and more labs, and another city, at some point you'll be in antartica and at another on Liberty Island (also looking like antartica). The palate in this game is severely lacking. And the 4 different endings are all kind of distasteful.

This game also had performance issues on every system I've ever played it on, except the Xbox. Certain areas would have profound, inexplicable slowdown. I've had similar performance issues with Thief 3, which was developed by the same peeps using the same Unreal engine,... my guess is they optimized the engine for the Xbox at the expense of the PC versions. Still, it's worth a play.
Publicada: 27 Maio
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8 de 12 pessoas (67%) acharam esta análise útil
0.3 hrs em registo
This game gets kind of a bad rap, and it's easy to see why. For one, it's a sequel to one of the most heavily lauded games ever made. That automatically put it in the position of trying to live up to a nigh-impossible standard. But the game isn't bad, it's just very average. That's it's biggest problem, really: It's an average game that's a sequel to an amazing one. (Well, that and the stupid cover with the guy holding a pistol sideways.)

Invisible War takes place about twenty years after Deus Ex. Events at the end of that game triggered something called "The Collapse", which basically crippled civilization and caused a wide variety of problems that people are still recovering from. In a way, the game implies that all three endings from DX1 sort-of happened: J.C. Denton attempted to merge with Helios but fails, which causes the global network to cease to function, which results in the downfall of national governments and the rise of "city-states". Some people have a problem with this, and while I'll certainly agree it could have been handled better, I'm not sure what people expected. Did they think that the developers would make three radically different settings depending on which ending you picked in the first game?

You play as Alex D, a nanoaugmented student in the Tarsus Academy. Of course, things aren't what they seem, and just as in the original Deus Ex, you have to uncover a conspiracy and puzzle out what's really going on.

The game plays out much as the original; you go from city to city performing missions, although in this game you get to choose whether you want to work for the Order (a religious group that springs up after the Collapse) or the World Trade Organization (which has more or less become the new version of the U.N. in this game). Which you choose does affect how the missions play out. However, it ultimately has no bearing on the way the game ends, which is another problem people have with it. I don't want to spoil the plot by explaining this, but I will say that I agree that the ultimate reveal is kind of dumb and renders a lot of your choices meaningless.

Another story element that some people complain about is how several characters from the first game return, but have radically different points of view than in the first game. However, this complaint seems rather naive to me. First of all, it's been twenty years. People change a lot over that period of time. But more importantly, the characters in question were all directly involved in the events that triggered the Collapse. If your ideals led to a catastrophic event causing untold amounts of death and devastation, don't you think that might change your outlook?

Gameplay-wise, the game is very similar to the original, but there are a few changes that were made to simplify things that ultimately work to the detriment of the game. The biomod system is less interesting, the level areas are smaller in order to accomodate the X-Box's memory limitations, but the worst change (and the one you will hear EVERYONE who plays this game ♥♥♥♥♥ about) is the ammunition system. In the original game (as in real life and in most FPSes), each weapon had its own ammunition, and in many cases a weapon had multiple ammo types you could choose between (for instance, shotguns had both buckshot and armor-piercing rounds). In this game, someone decided it would be a good idea to have every weapon use the same ammunition counter. The conceit is that the weapons are using nanomachines to build ammunition, and that your "ammo" is actually the raw material used to make bullets and whatnot. The biggest problem with this is that the amount of this material that you can carry is severely restricted, and heavy weapons take a huge amount of material to fire. If you, say, use a rocket launcher a few times, you may suddenly find yourself having no ammo for your pistol.

Like I said: Overall, it's not a terrible game; it's just not good, either.It's easy to see why, when they made a third game, they chose to make it a prequel. Even if this had been a great game, it's hard to see where the series could go from here. I think the only way we're ever going to get a Deus Ex game set after the first one is if they reboot the original first... which, depending on how it's done, could be pretty cool, actually.


If you're a fan of the original Deus Ex, I would recommend playing through Invisible War at least once to see for yourself what's good and what's bad about it.
Publicada: 26 Julho
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6 de 10 pessoas (60%) acharam esta análise útil
13.7 hrs em registo
I'm only recommending this game because of it's story. Other features of the game are really bad. It keeps crashing when you travel somewhere and it's really annoying. Optimize is not that good. Gameplay is much easier than the first one. Also, they've restrained most of the features. For example, we don't have a skill tree anymore. Biomods will do the job. I gotta say it didn't feel like Deus Ex. Story is really strange and beautiful. You're playing as Alex Denton. He has an advanced system than JC. Also, he's the first protagonist who doesn't wear sunglasses in DX series. If I have to vote this game I'd give 6/10 to it.
Publicada: 17 Setembro
Achaste esta análise útil? Sim Não