L'autrefois paisible Royaume de Gorudo est menacé par une présence démoniaque. Le seul espoir pour la survie est Cyrus !
Évaluations des utilisateurs :
Globales :
plutôt positives (624 évaluation(s)) - 70% des 624 évaluations des utilisateurs pour ce jeu sont positives.
Date de parution : 14 mar 2012

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23 décembre 2015

Happy Holidays! 50% + OFF on all Tribute Games!

The holidays are a time to bring families and friends together and nothing brings everyone together like video games!

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During the holidays you can :

Venture into the world of brick-breaking fantasy in Wizorb with 66% OFF !

Fight the forces of CLAW (with three of your loved ones) in action-platforming style in Mercenary Kings: 55% OFF !

Smash monsters in the face, alone or with a friend in Curses N Chaos: 55% OFF !

If you already have those games, thank you very much! We hope you'll check out our upcoming games in 2016!

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Steam Big Picture

À propos de ce jeu

L'autrefois paisible Royaume de Gorudo est menacé par une présence démoniaque. Le seul espoir pour la survie est Cyrus, un magicien spécialisé dans un art magique secret dénommé Wizorb ! Explorez de nombreux endroits étranges, de Clover, la ville abandonnée infestée de monstres, au Château de Gorudo en passant par Cauldron Peak. Le danger guette chaque recoin donc vous devrez rester attentif et avoir des réflexes à toutes épreuves afin de survivre.

Caractéristiques :


  • Un tout nouveau jeu casse-briques situé dans un monde fantasy.
  • Utilisez votre magie pour lancer des orbes et des sorts magiques.
  • Plus de 60 niveaux situés dans 5 mondes différents.
  • Gagnez de l'or pour acheter des attraits ou aidez les citoyens à reconstruire leur maison.
  • Combats épiques contre les boss.
  • Fins multiples.
  • Animations des personnages créées par Paul Robertson.

Configuration requise

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    • Système d'exploitation : Windows XP ou ultérieur
    • Processeur : Processeur double cœur (Intel double cœur 2.0 GHz ou AMD Athlon X2 5200+ 2.6 GHz)
    • Mémoire vive : 1 Go de RAM
    • DirectX® : DirectX 9.0c
    • Disque dur : 250 Mo d'espace disque disponible
    • Son : Carte son compatible DirectX 9.0c
    • Système d'exploitation : Mac OS X 10.6 ou ultérieure
    • Processeur : Intel Core™ Duo ou plus rapide
    • Mémoire vive : 1 Go de RAM
    • Disque dur : 250 Mo d'espace disque disponible
    • Carte graphique : Carte comportant 128 Mo de mémoire vidéo
    • OS:glibc 2.15+, 32/64-bit. S3TC support is NOT required.
    • Processor:Dual-core processor (Intel Dual Core 2.0 GHz or AMD Athlon X2 5200+ 2.6 GHz)
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • Graphics:OpenGL 3.0+ support (2.1 with ARB extensions acceptable)
    • Hard Drive:250 MB HD space
Évaluations des utilisateurs
Le système d'évaluations des utilisateurs a été mis à jour ! En savoir plus
Globales :
plutôt positives (624 évaluation(s))
Publiées récemment
DamarusRex
( 6.9 heures en tout )
Posté le : 29 mai
Way too shoooort!
This game is part of a dream I have : a breakout rpg. And even tho the rpg isn't much exploited here, the art is great, the retro feel is doing the job (and thx for keeping it 2D), and discovering the different areas and mobs is fun.
Then again the game lacks of real inovative features in the genre, and is short, even with the hardest difficulty.
One idea would have been to implement a level editor, and get a workshop going. Sadly the devs didn't think about those and aren't even thinking about a sequel to this pearl.
What a shame, I'd kill for a Wizorb 2 with coop and real rpg synergies!

One last bit : the easiest difficulty is ridiculously slow, so I advise buyers to start on higher ones!
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Iscariot1337
( 8.9 heures en tout )
Posté le : 24 mai
Fun. Short. HARD.

This game is like breakout, but set in an old-school JRPG style environment. There is a (single) town you can walk around in, and even complete some "donation" quests there. Otherwise, the other environments are breakout-style dungeons.
This game is also pretty freaking difficult, so be prepared for that.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
wardmuylaert
( 0.3 heures en tout )
Posté le : 15 mai
Seems to be breakout with some story around it. Not my thing.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Netflix_Dad_2k10
( 0.3 heures en tout )
Posté le : 1 mai
no game please
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
^6Холокосби
( 13.0 heures en tout )
Posté le : 28 avril
is good
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Bassem
( 9.3 heures en tout )
Posté le : 12 avril
Hardcore, old-school block-breaking fun. Most of the time.

I disagree with the "casual" tag on this game. It's one of the more difficult Breakout-type games I've played, requiring very precise aiming in the later levels as well as when there's one block left that you need to break, nestled between unbreakable blocks.
The level design is also very unforgiving in the later stages, and if you're a score chaser you need to finish each level set ("world") in one sitting or you'll lose your score.
So if that sounds like your kinda game, read on!

What I enjoyed
  • A beautiful old-school feel to the graphics and audio.
  • Solid block-breaking play.
  • The game is enhanced by adding an upgrade shop in most levels.
  • Spellcasting helps you shoot blocks, guide the ball and more. There are more spells than you might think; check the in-game help for a full list.
  • There are varied themes for the levels grouped into different "worlds" or regions that you access on a map.
  • In between missions, you can spend your gold to help restore a village and receive rewards, as well as equip for the next "world".
What I didn't like
  • In the later levels, too many unbreakable blocks are placed in rows very close to the paddle, leading to very fast bouncing back and forth and more chance of missing the marble. This is artificial difficulty and just unfair.
  • If you go back to the map without finishing a "world", you lose all your progress in that set of levels.
  • If you save and quit the game, your level progress in the "world" is saved but your score is reset. No idea what drove this decision. It prevents short play sessions. We don't all have time to sit through a whole level set.
  • Related to the above progression issues, there is no arcade mode that lets you jump into any level you've previously completed. You have to go through the campaign.
It's difficult to decide whether to recommend this game or not. And you'll see the other Steam reviewers saying the same. It looks and sounds lovely, and the gameplay can be fun, but there are many annoyances.
Yes, recommended because there is definitely enough enjoyment for the low asking price.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Big Daddy Red
( 5.6 heures en tout )
Posté le : 2 avril
This game is way too ♥♥♥♥ing hard. Who is this made for? Not for kids clearly as it's so godamn hard. Please dont waste your money on this piece of ♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥ing game.

Stages are 16 levels straight with only 3 continues and 2 lives to start with. You can buy more lives but they will be gone in a second.

If you like watching your stupid orb bounce around for 20 minutes waiting to hit the last brick then please buy this game. Otherwise avoid.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Dasbooby
( 2.1 heures en tout )
Posté le : 24 mars
Not much to say here. RPG elements are fairly light and it's going to be impossible for some people to get past the boring gameplay. If you enjoy bouncy ball block destroying games, you'll probably like this. If you don't like bouncy ball block destroying games, you'll be bored within 5 minutes.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
You've been a salty frog ;)
( 3.5 heures en tout )
Posté le : 22 mars
:wizorblaugh:
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Seb Ryu 84
( 4.4 heures en tout )
Posté le : 19 mars
Bon petit jeu rétro. Une manière originale de présenter un casse brique. Si vous avez un peu de temps devant vous, allez-y il est très plaisant, pas difficile et pas très long.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Anavrin
( 3.7 heures en tout )
Posté le : 16 mars
As a fan of Arkanoid, I have to wonder how they possibly made a game in this genre as boring as it is. It's frustrating for so many reasons, including silly acceleration, crappy physics and a paddle that doesn't control very well. The levels are annoying and there's no sense of accomplishment - only of angular luck.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Biz Nastee
( 3.3 heures en tout )
Posté le : 15 mars
This game is like a Wizard and an Orb all rolled into one, and put into a game called Arkanoid where you have to breakout the blocks you find in an alleyway, in what the Japanese would call "block kuzushi". This game is off the wall, and not what I would simply call a Breakout clone.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
halykan
( 3.7 heures en tout )
Posté le : 14 mars
It's a classic Breakout style game with a few modern indie twists. The art is pretty and the game is short; also the usual indie story. It's an entertaining way to kill a few hours. I haven't had much interest in replaying it myself but I would say the game offers some replayability. Buy it for the right price and you'll enjoy it.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Bumblebugbee3
( 5.6 heures en tout )
Posté le : 28 février
Wizorb at its core is a block breaking game similar to Breakout and Arkanoid. The difference from these classics is how it expands on their simple formula in almost every way possible. You play as the wizard Cyrus who transforms himself into his staff to be used as your paddle. Like any true wizard you have magical powers that will help aid you on your journey. If its adventure you find yourself on you can bet there is a story too. This game tries to do a lot of things and usually manages to do so quite successfully.

Wizorb is a very vibrate and colorful game with its 16-bit inspired, retro, graphics. The different monsters, environments, pick-ups, and bricks all come together for a clean, uniform, style. While the story isn't quite a enthralling as the visuals it does help incentivize your progression. Tarot village has been ravaged my monsters and all the town folk need money to repair their homes and businesses. By playing through the different levels you'll even money you can use both to help out the citizens and buy different power-ups. The power-ups will give you a temporary boost that last until you lose a life. The different power-ups from range from paddle extensions to sticky, slow and multi balls.

The long the ball remains in play it will move faster with each hit off your paddle. At top speed its become quite difficult to keep your paddle lined up with the ball. Thankfully, you have different magic powers you can to help make life easier. As soon as the ball bounces off your paddle you can transform it into a burning ball that will pass through multiple bricks or give it wings and guide it into a certain area. While the ball is flying around you can shoot fireballs from your paddle or blow a gust of wind to change the direction of your ball. These all drain your magic bar which can be replenished with potions. Also, if you go so long without hitting anything your ball will start to glow and the next time you hit it you'll receive some magic.

There are five different areas you must fight through to save the kingdom. Each area has a unique theme, a set number of stages, and a boss battle. Each level becomes progressively harder with bricks and enemies becoming tougher and harder to hit. Look for rooms that provide bonuses and shops. Watch out as any purple objects that falls onto your paddle with have a negative effect and could even kill you. Replay levels for coins, score, and bonus stages used to free four sages who when reunited grant access to a special power.

Wizorb is a beautiful indie game with some really unique mechanics. The sense of progression of the difficulty feels spot on. Only in the last area does the game really start to almost too difficult. There are times too where it feels the paddle isn't quite as responsive as it needs to be which can be frustrating when the ball gets up to top speed. These aspects do make this game feel a little bit harder than it needed to be however Wizorb is still easy to recommend. The magic abilities are a blast and there is a wonderful sense of adventure. This is arcade style game is wonderfully crafted and thoroughly enjoyable.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
bruelltuete
( 0.2 heures en tout )
Posté le : 22 février
...
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Demon Smiles
( 1.2 heures en tout )
Posté le : 21 février
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Shawnecy
( 0.9 heures en tout )
Posté le : 13 février
The Arkanoid-clone genre has never been one to top any charts. Unfortunately, this game doesn't do anything to change. That really is unfortunate in this case because this game does retro so well. It's got music that reminds me of Legend of Zelda, and I could see myself playing this on one of the old consoles, with the game's title art prominently displayed on its cartridge. The controls serve their purpose, although that may be where the problems start to come in. Aside from the paddle, you only control spell casting/ball launching. It's all pretty standard faire here really, which when it comes to Arkanoid clones, means it comes up as short as the genre.

To give some examples of fine genre features that don't benefit the fun factor: why can the ball travel faster from left to right than my paddle under any conditions? It means I often get to watch the ball go kerplunk, and consequently I'm constantly left wishing my paddle was just slightly faster. I can literally watch seconds tick off the clock as I know I'm about to lose a ball and there's nothing I can do about it. Why not have a little stamina bar that I can burn down to move faster for a short time, and then wait for it to refill (manually or automatically)? Why in 2012 (the game's release date) do I still have to choose between getting a powerup and not dieing? This is perhaps one of the worst feelings: constantly watching your powerups drop off the screen because the only way to get them is to touch them with the paddle. Why not have them sit there and require me to hit them with the ball? Or why not pick them up automatically once I've destroyed whatever block contained them and they are revealed? Or why not have a little automated helper that picks them up? Players experience less of what the game has to offer in the ways of powerups and spell-casting (since one of the powerups restores magic) because of this mechanic.

I imagine the die-hard Arkanoid-clone fans would thoroughly enjoy this game and may even explain the number of positive reviews. I however felt myself wishing for something that better addressed what I (and likely many others) have felt are the genre's shortcomings. Not a bad game, but perhaps a little too much of the same ol' same ol' if you're not a big fan of this genre already. 5/10.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
AristideDupuis
( 0.4 heures en tout )
Posté le : 10 février
Simply not that fun, not action nor adventure, it's just a block breaking game. You have to earn gold to rebuild the town but the only way to earn any gold is to play through every single level in a stage, and just to be clear, the first stage has something like 12 levels, and you start with 3 lives that if you lose them all you're forced to start over with no gain. Level design is kinda ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥t as well, difficulties only make the ball move faster which makes it even worse.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Gumball Watterson
( 8.5 heures en tout )
Posté le : 27 janvier
This is the first retro game I've ever rage quit on. 4 years later in beat it today and my Ending is 2 ♥♥♥♥ing Pictures and the credits ripping off Megaman 2?! Just use your 2 bucks on a cheeseburger. It's not worth the frustration and suffering through its horrifically bad soundtrack that makes The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle on the NES sound like Link to the Past. By far the worst Arkanoid type game I have ever played. 1 point for the charming dialogue of the townspeople.
1/10
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Pizza
( 0.2 heures en tout )
Posté le : 25 janvier
Wizorb looks, sounds and plays on par if not even above what you'd expect from a real SNES game.

Buy this, it's lovingly crafted.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Évaluations les plus pertinentes  Dans les 90 derniers jours
4 personne(s) sur 4 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
2 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Recommandé
3.3 heures en tout
Posté le : 15 mars
This game is like a Wizard and an Orb all rolled into one, and put into a game called Arkanoid where you have to breakout the blocks you find in an alleyway, in what the Japanese would call "block kuzushi". This game is off the wall, and not what I would simply call a Breakout clone.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
3 personne(s) sur 3 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
9.3 heures en tout
Posté le : 12 avril
Hardcore, old-school block-breaking fun. Most of the time.

I disagree with the "casual" tag on this game. It's one of the more difficult Breakout-type games I've played, requiring very precise aiming in the later levels as well as when there's one block left that you need to break, nestled between unbreakable blocks.
The level design is also very unforgiving in the later stages, and if you're a score chaser you need to finish each level set ("world") in one sitting or you'll lose your score.
So if that sounds like your kinda game, read on!

What I enjoyed
  • A beautiful old-school feel to the graphics and audio.
  • Solid block-breaking play.
  • The game is enhanced by adding an upgrade shop in most levels.
  • Spellcasting helps you shoot blocks, guide the ball and more. There are more spells than you might think; check the in-game help for a full list.
  • There are varied themes for the levels grouped into different "worlds" or regions that you access on a map.
  • In between missions, you can spend your gold to help restore a village and receive rewards, as well as equip for the next "world".
What I didn't like
  • In the later levels, too many unbreakable blocks are placed in rows very close to the paddle, leading to very fast bouncing back and forth and more chance of missing the marble. This is artificial difficulty and just unfair.
  • If you go back to the map without finishing a "world", you lose all your progress in that set of levels.
  • If you save and quit the game, your level progress in the "world" is saved but your score is reset. No idea what drove this decision. It prevents short play sessions. We don't all have time to sit through a whole level set.
  • Related to the above progression issues, there is no arcade mode that lets you jump into any level you've previously completed. You have to go through the campaign.
It's difficult to decide whether to recommend this game or not. And you'll see the other Steam reviewers saying the same. It looks and sounds lovely, and the gameplay can be fun, but there are many annoyances.
Yes, recommended because there is definitely enough enjoyment for the low asking price.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
1 personne(s) sur 1 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Recommandé
3.5 heures en tout
Posté le : 22 mars
:wizorblaugh:
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
1 personne(s) sur 1 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
3.7 heures en tout
Posté le : 16 mars
As a fan of Arkanoid, I have to wonder how they possibly made a game in this genre as boring as it is. It's frustrating for so many reasons, including silly acceleration, crappy physics and a paddle that doesn't control very well. The levels are annoying and there's no sense of accomplishment - only of angular luck.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Évaluations les plus pertinentes  Dans les 180 derniers jours
1 personne(s) sur 1 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
0.9 heures en tout
Posté le : 13 février
The Arkanoid-clone genre has never been one to top any charts. Unfortunately, this game doesn't do anything to change. That really is unfortunate in this case because this game does retro so well. It's got music that reminds me of Legend of Zelda, and I could see myself playing this on one of the old consoles, with the game's title art prominently displayed on its cartridge. The controls serve their purpose, although that may be where the problems start to come in. Aside from the paddle, you only control spell casting/ball launching. It's all pretty standard faire here really, which when it comes to Arkanoid clones, means it comes up as short as the genre.

To give some examples of fine genre features that don't benefit the fun factor: why can the ball travel faster from left to right than my paddle under any conditions? It means I often get to watch the ball go kerplunk, and consequently I'm constantly left wishing my paddle was just slightly faster. I can literally watch seconds tick off the clock as I know I'm about to lose a ball and there's nothing I can do about it. Why not have a little stamina bar that I can burn down to move faster for a short time, and then wait for it to refill (manually or automatically)? Why in 2012 (the game's release date) do I still have to choose between getting a powerup and not dieing? This is perhaps one of the worst feelings: constantly watching your powerups drop off the screen because the only way to get them is to touch them with the paddle. Why not have them sit there and require me to hit them with the ball? Or why not pick them up automatically once I've destroyed whatever block contained them and they are revealed? Or why not have a little automated helper that picks them up? Players experience less of what the game has to offer in the ways of powerups and spell-casting (since one of the powerups restores magic) because of this mechanic.

I imagine the die-hard Arkanoid-clone fans would thoroughly enjoy this game and may even explain the number of positive reviews. I however felt myself wishing for something that better addressed what I (and likely many others) have felt are the genre's shortcomings. Not a bad game, but perhaps a little too much of the same ol' same ol' if you're not a big fan of this genre already. 5/10.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
1 personne(s) sur 1 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Non recommandé
0.2 heures en tout
Posté le : 22 février
...
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
1 personne(s) sur 2 (50%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Évaluations les plus pertinentes  Globales
12 personne(s) sur 17 (71%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
5 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Non recommandé
5.1 heures en tout
Posté le : 3 avril 2015
Quand on parle de casse-briques, que ce soit d'un point de vue de joueur ou de designer, il faut connaître ses classiques : Arkanoid, Breakout, Ricochet, heck. Même les deux DX-Ball rentrent dans la catégorie, parce que bon sang, qui n'a jamais joué à DX-Ball ? Hein ?

Après, le genre, on l'aime ou pas. Perso, ça me gêne pas. J'ai commencé à racler les casse-briques sur C64, c'est pas pour m'arrêter un quart de siècle plus tard hein.

Mais c'est peut-être bien là que les ennuis commencent : à y avoir pris goût, à y avoir joué tant et plus... On finit par savoir ce qui fait un bon casse-briques.

Oh, c'est pas bien compliqué hein. C'est même limite comme d'habitude : la musique on s'en cogne, les graphismes on s'en fout, la difficulté on s'en tape, l'innovation pour quoi faire ?

Non, il y a un et un seul et unique (dieu que c'est beau dit comme ça) paramètre à prendre en compte et à maîtriser pour reconnaître et/ou faire un bon casse-briques : avoir un level design qui pète sa race, qui allume la culotte à la mémé, qui envoie du lourd, qui limite le vocabulaire du joueur à "rhâ péripatéticienne que c'est bon".

Wizorb se présente, grosso merdo, comme un hybride casse-briques/RPG 16-bit sa mère. Le côté 16-bit sa mère, je confirme. Le côté RPG...

Comment dire ? Imagine un jeu de town management où tu dois acheter des upgrades. Oui, je sais, rien à voir avec un RPG. Imagine quand même. Maintenant imagine que TOUT ce que tu peux acheter est PARFAITEMENT inutile. T'y es ? OK, le voilà ton côté RPG.

Rhô, c'est bon, crie pas déjà au scandale, on a à peine commencé.

Après, on pourrait dire que ouais, mais non, le côté RPG, tu vois, t'as aussi un item shop et... - et TA GUEULE. Tu veux qu'on parle de Forgotten Worlds, voir ? Tu vas me dire que c'est un hybride shmup/RPG, aussi ?

Les jeunes, je te jure.

Bref : c'est à peu près aussi RPG-esque qu'une feuille de papier à rouler finement ciselée en quarante par l'épaisseur. C'est pas que tu vois au travers, c'est que tu rentres carrément dans le champ des possibles quantiques.

Côté musique... C'est naze. Non, sérieux. Je veux dire, la musique par loops de 18 secondes ça va dix minutes, après ça devient juste assez horripilant pour ajouter à la médiocrité ambiante.

Les graphismes... Bah c'est 16-bit. Mais genre le mauvais 16-bit. Pas visuellement mmh. En soi, y'a rien de mauvais au look global. Non, c'est plutôt par manque de lisibilité que ça pêche. Un instant de distraction et on évalue mal les murs latéraux dans le monde 5, on évalue mal les hitboxes des piliers du monde 4, et j'en passe. Et ça... Ça ne pardonne guère malheureusement.

Mais le vrai défaut de Wizorb, celui qui éclipse tout ça et qui fait du jeu un échec, une monstruosité, une abomination même, c'est les deux seuls points sur lesquels le jeu ne devait pas se vautrer lamentablement la tronche dans le tas de déjections fraîchement éjectés sur les rails de King's Cross.

C'est le level design et le gameplay. Et honnêtement, à y réfléchir, l'image qui vient de te passer sous le nez et les narines est probablement la plus appropriée, lecteur : ça a le look des excréments, l'odeur des excréments, le goût des excréments... Ouais, je pense bien que c'est de la ♥♥♥♥♥.

Vois-tu, le casse-briques, au cas où tu ne le pratiquerais pas, repose sur trois principes immuables.
1. La balle accélère, lentement mais sûrement.
2. Les rebonds sont prévisibles.
3. Le pad peut TOUJOURS suivre la balle.

Moralité de l'histoire ? Il n'est JAMAIS question de chance dans un casse-briques, seulement de compétence.

Mais ça... Tribute semble ne pas l'avoir compris. Les niveaux et le principe sont mal torchés au possible. Imagine un instant que tu aies deux pouvoirs magiques (bon, quatre en fait, mais les deux autres sont très spécifiques et tout aussi inutiles, la faute au level design. Tout est lié). Tranquille ? Bien ? Imagine maintenant qu'ils ne servent à RIEN. Voilà à quoi mène le level design de Wizorb.

C'est simple : très, trop souvent, en particulier à partir du monde 4, aucune brique ne sera plus attaquable par le dessous. Autrement dit, la boule de feu est out. Reste le coup de vent, me diras-tu. Ah oui. Mais encore faudrait-il AVANT TOUT pouvoir décider dans quel sens on va le lancer. Nous on le sait, hein. C'est juste que le jeu n'en a RIEN à branler et va faire ça au hasard. Et que donc ce qui doit être un test de compétence devient un lancer de dés contre ton total actuel de chance.

Moche ? Si peu. Là où ça le devient réellement, c'est quand le jeu finit en casino mal déguisé. À partir du monde 4, c'est l'orgie : ennemis qu'on ne peut attaquer que par au-dessus, qui se téléportent à des endroits improbables, qui s'approchent trop près de la batte pour encore être gérables (puisque BIEN ÉVIDEMMENT le principe de prédiction des rebonds peut aller se faire mettre, le design sain c'est pour les faibles), les bosses sont imprévisibles et parfois, comme avec la mort, lancent un tir qui one-shotte la batte tandis que la balle, qui vient de toucher le boss par-derrière parce qu'évidemment on ne peut l'attaquer que par là, redescend à toute vitesse de l'AUTRE côté du tir en question. Lance les dés, lecteur. Oh pardon, même pas besoin.

L'un des pires péchés que puisse commettre un jeu, c'est d'allonger artificiellement sa durée de vie. Wizorb est un exercice en la matière, un cas d'école, que tu ferais mieux d'éviter, lecteur. Chope plutôt DX-Ball 2 ou émule Ricochet, eux au moins restent des valeurs sûres.
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6 personne(s) sur 6 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Recommandé
1.8 heures en tout
Posté le : 11 mars 2014
POSITIVE : If you loved ARKANOID on the NES system, this game is for you! 16-Bits graphics are pretty, the controls responds very well, the music is okay, the little addition to fight a boss after 13 levels is genius and of course, the possibility to use some magics like shooting fireballs, use wind to deviate your ball, teleport, etc. is very cool. The more you destroy blocks, ennemies, chest and more with your magical ball, the more you can give money on your destroyed village and rebuild it! RPG element with 'Arkanoid-style' game = Great!

NEGATIVE : The level design is somewhat boring if there's just one or two blocks that cannot be touched due to unbreakable blocks or walls. Patience is recommended. Save system is somewhat dull... You must proceed from Level 1 to 12 AND fight a boss without QUIT or SAVE. If you do that, you lost EVERYTHING... In all, a pretty good game! 7.5/10
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2 personne(s) sur 2 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
4.7 heures en tout
Posté le : 16 juillet 2012
Pur moment de détente pour les fans de casse briques !!!
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94 personne(s) sur 134 (70%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Non recommandé
6.5 heures en tout
Posté le : 19 janvier 2014
I really, really tried to like this game. I love the graphical style and I enjoy 'Breakout' type of games; I was hoping that this would be an evolution of them. It's not. It's slow and monotonous.

You begin in a broken town. In order to rebuild you must go into the dungeons, earn money, and donate it to the townspeople. The dungeons are different environments such as a forest, castle and mine; all are presented beautifully in an elegant SNES anime style. The style is so pretty in fact that it was the main draw for me to buy the game.

The gameplay is close to the classic Arkanoid/Breakout games. You have a paddle at the bottom of the screen that keeps a ball bouncing around on the 'table'; there are bricks on the table you must break which hold gold and various powerups that help you, or conditions that weaken your paddle. Once you break all the bricks with the ball: you win the level. If you let the ball fall out of the bottom you lose a life, once all lives are gone you restart the world unless you buy a continue with the gold you're using to rebuild the town, or buy items. There are also stores in some of the levels, bonus areas to get extra lives and items, and spells that help you speed up the process of breaking the blocks.

The problem with the game is that it doesn't deviate from the Breakout formula enough; so if you've ever played one of them then you've played a very close version of this game, and it has similar problems.

Once you've broken most of the bricks in a level, the ball tends to just bounce around missing the bricks that it's been missing since the beginning of the level, especially the bricks in the corners. This is supposed to be solved with your spells which allow you to change the angle of the ball mid-movement, a fireball spell that lets you shoot up from your paddle, and a few spells that allow you to set the ball where you want. They work for the first dungeon and that's about it. In later levels there are unbreakable blocks, blocks that take many hits to destroy, and barriers that slow your progression through levels to an eye-gouging crawl.

It's just boring. If you've scrolled to the bottom of this review for a score, it's boring/out of 10.
I wish I could tell you that the graphics are enough to purchase the game, but it's just a bore.

Please don't waste your money or time.
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36 personne(s) sur 45 (80%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
7.1 heures en tout
Posté le : 11 juillet 2014
This game is very hard to love. It is one where the distinction between recommending it and saying it isn't worth it is hard. The visuals are very nice, considering they are done by paul robertson, this is a given. The gameplay itself is where the issues fall. You have magic powers, such as the ability to teleport the ball or control where it floats. While these powers are nice, the game is incredibly difficult. Blocks which need to be broken are almost always behind unbreakable objects and the further you venture into the game, the more often this occurs. If you enjoy a challenge and like brick breaking games, go for it if this game is on a good sale. I enjoyed the challenge of the game so I give it my approval, but this game is definately not for everyone.
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34 personne(s) sur 51 (67%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Non recommandé
5.3 heures en tout
Posté le : 10 mars 2014
☺ Beautiful Presentation.
☺ Classic 'Breakout' gameplay.

☹ Quite Short.
☹ Classic 'Breakout' gameplay.

The presentation of Wizorb is superb, every time I boot it up it feels like I've just stuck a cartridge into the SNES - both the visuals and the sound hit their mark (unlike the orb which is still bouncing around aimlessly). You play as a mighty Wizard who's immense magic power seems to transform him into a...stick. Well, a paddle. Seeing that his next feat of insurmountable power is conjuring a little floating orb, this isn't as useless as it sounds.

The game at it's heart is a breakout style brick breaking game where you rebound a ball using a small paddle you control into the targets until none remain. Although there are a couple of spells such as engulfing your ball in flames to pass through multiple blocks or subtly altering its direction with a breath of wind, they really don't do all that much to change up the game and crucially, don't always stop you from the dreaded 'last brick standing' challenge of rebounding around the level for a few minutes until you get lucky enough to hit that last, stubborn brick.

You're tasked with helping a small village rebuild as you venture out and defeat monsters and destroy targets of varying shapes and sizes (I'm not quite sure what great threat a bush is to the already destroyed village, but its your task to crush them into leafy pulps!). The highlight to the gameplay is the boss battles, which is a neat little twist that see's you fighting a much tougher enemy that has a few skills of their own - it's just a shame this sort of thing wasn't the norm, as other enemies simply act as mobile targets.

I played the game with a mouse (the clicky kind, not the squeaky kind) and found the controls to be smooth and responsive, although I did get a slight stutter now and then - nothing that impacted the gameplay, but it did come close.

It's hard to recommend Wizorb to all but the biggest Breakout fans as it just doesn't offer that much compared to other brick breaking games, despite the wonderful presentation. If you're a fan though, its a fair price for what's on offer.
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21 personne(s) sur 29 (72%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
7.7 heures en tout
Posté le : 22 août 2013
Wizorb is basically an Arkanoid/Breakout clone. It's pretty decent, but like other games in this genre, the devs like to design maps where your powers are of limited use (typically placing blocks behind indestructible objects), and thus you spend several minutes trying to get that one last block.

The graphics have a charming old school 8-bit look, and are well-animated. The music is... forgettable.

The speed of the paddle is defaulted to 1. I highly recommend changing that to 3 when starting, or you will quickly find the ball outpaces you. Even then, it doesn't move fast enough.

Despite being marked as having full controller support, it didn't recognize my PS2 controller, but Joy2Key solves that, as usual. You'd think mouse control would work well, but for some reason the paddle actually moves slower than using a keyboard, thus mice are less than ideal.

I think the biggest problem with the game is how much potential was wasted. It presents some cool RPG-like features like walking around in town and gathering cash to buy stuff, but most purchases do little for you. It would have been awesome if you could gain levels and gain permanent items, and actually feel a gradual progression of becoming stronger. But as usual, one death and you're back to square one. And of course there's the near non-existent story.

The best quality of the game is perhaps how inexpensive it is - less than $1 on a sale. Is it worth it? Well considering I finished in about an 3 hours with little replay value, it's... hard to say. If I had more fun I'd easily recommend it. I'd be willing to bet I could find, or even make a Breakout clone that could hold my attention better.
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25 personne(s) sur 37 (68%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
11.6 heures en tout
Posté le : 2 novembre 2014
Don't be fooled by its looks.
Wizorb is off to a pleasant start with its charming pixel look reminiscent of the RPGs of the days of yore. It's miles better than most pixellated wannabe-retro indie games nowadays.
However, while it wears the RPG design on its sleeves, it's all merely eye candy.
You visit a single tiny hub town serving as little more than a place to shop for items, talk to every person once and be done with the RPG side of things. Gameplay-wise Wizorb is 95% Arkanoid/Breakout and 5% RPG. At most.
Unfortunately, the paddle action isn't the tightest either with some rooms taking a dreadfully long time to complete.
The magic system is neat with its fireballs and gusts of wind, but it runs dry quickly by giving you all options very early in the game. Maybe they should have saved some spells for later.

For the low price the developer is asking for it might even be worth a quick shot for diehard fans of the genre, but if you're here for the RPG aspect, don't bother. Also, I hate achievements that turn into huge grindfests. While I did get 100% achievements within a couple of hours, those last few hours had been spent with repeatedly grinding for money.
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16 personne(s) sur 22 (73%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
2 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Non recommandé
10.4 heures en tout
Posté le : 17 novembre 2015
Great pixel art, fun concept. But the level design gets terrible in the lategame. Expect to spend 30 seconds at a time watching a ball bounce between unbreakable objects while you wait for your split-second chance to hit it again, at which point you will probably miss one of the hundreds of essentially luck-based rebound shots required to progress.

This game has forced mouse acceleration, and you might experience unplayably slow paddle movement in fullscreen mode.
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35 personne(s) sur 58 (60%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
10.5 heures en tout
Posté le : 26 novembre 2013
This game is supposed to be a modern day arkanoid with rpg elements, however the rpg part is too little and the brick breaking is too much. The most annoying part is trying to hit those last bricks that the ball just wont go to, level after level, which basically makes you feel like you are wasting your time. Would mainly recommend to retro-arkanoid fanatics only. I wish I had gotten a warning about this before getting it, so I am giving out a warning to you instead.
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11 personne(s) sur 14 (79%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
18.0 heures en tout
Posté le : 6 avril 2014
Introduction:
Wizorb is a Breakout style game that combines the familiar gameplay of Breakout with RPG elements. How does this interesting combination work together? Quite well, actually. While there are apparent flaws in the game at some moments, as a whole, Wizorb is worth playing.



Gameplay:
While RPG elements are present, there is no real "story" to speak of. Simply put, you're a Wizard who uses paddleball magic to defeat monsters. Neat! By earning a high score and defeating enemies, you are awarded with gold (GP). This gold can be used to purchase extra lives, help the people of Tarot Village, and charms - such as triple balls, a magnet, double damage, and more - that are lost upon death. Gold is very plentiful in the game, making affording these things practically a non-issue. While this is not a flaw, it removes some thinking from the game.

Why is this game called Wizorb? There are also magic elements. You can cast fireballs to help kill monsters and destroy blocks, summon gusts of wind to direct your ball, and set your ball on fire to add penetration. Unfortunately, I largely ignored these mechanics as I did not really need them - there are no stages or puzzles that require clever use of magic, they merely make the game easier. You are limited in your magic use by a "mana" pool, preventing the game from getting too easy. There are missed opportunities to fully flesh out the use of magic in this game, however is is still a fun and innovative system.

There are four worlds in the game each containing 12 stages and a boss fight - there are additional bonus levels besides this. Each of these worlds carries its own theme and introduces new blocks and enemies.

The stages are - for the most part - well designed. I felt as though the later stages became too long and had too many invulnerable blocks, though it was still enjoyable. There are a few "cheap" things in the game such as instant-death, however they are sparse enough to not ruin the enjoyment too much.



Art & Graphics:
The game's art style is very pleasing to the eye. It takes inspiration from the games of old, giving a pixelated look. This means the game has / will age very well. The enemies are pleasing to look at and fit the theme of the game; the bosses especially are very well designed artistically.



Sound:
As soon as you click a button on the main menu, you'll be met with a satisfying sound that gets you ready for the game. A classic RPG-esque sound plays whenever you damage an enemy, and the Breakout "dink" sound plays when our ball hits a block. While none of these sounds are amazingly designed, it all fits the theme of the game spectacularly.



Replay Value:
My playthrough on Normal took about 4 hours. However, earning a high score on a level awards you with a star ranking for that world, giving something to work towards. There is also a Hard difficulty, achievements, and an in-game leaderboard.



Prismatic Complaints:
I have very few annoyances with the game. However, you can only have one save file at a time. If you complete the game on Normal, your save file will be completely deleted if you want to play the game again on Hard difficulty. The game may also be difficult to get used to initially, especially if begun on Hard, however I do not consider this a real issue.



Closing:
While it has its flaws, Wizorb gives a very interesting take on the standard Breakout gameplay. Each world was fun to play with each level being a joy to get through. I highly recommended Wizorb to Breakout fans and non-Breakout fans alike.
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14 personne(s) sur 21 (67%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
2.0 heures en tout
Posté le : 30 novembre 2014
The first zone of Wizorb requires you to complete twelve levels and a boss in a single sitting; if you lose all your lives or quit in the middle of it, you keep none of your hard-earned gold. Precise mouse control with left- and right-click is clearly a superior option to two-speed digital control, but the UI makes no reference to mice, instead displaying either keyboard or controller buttons. The music is droning and repetitive and doesn't stop if you alt-tab out. While these various quibbles aren't dealbreaking, the game clearly feels like a 90s era console game, but doesn't really take advantage of that fact.

On the gameplay side, hitboxes aren't nearly as clear as they should be for a genre that demands precision. Boxes, for instance, only have hitboxes on the top portion, as the ball is effectively floating off of the ground. This is probably the biggest dealbreaker, especially where enemies are likely to hover near the bottom of the level and liable to send your ball careening in a seemingly random direction.

In all, Wizorb feels like a poor PC port of a mediocre Xbox game.
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33 personne(s) sur 57 (58%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
3.7 heures en tout
Posté le : 15 novembre 2013
You know how the worst part of playing Breakout is when you just have one or two pieces left and you're desperately trying to maneuver your ball to that spot for five minutes straight? Imagine doing that for every single one of this game's 60 levels. That's what Wizorb is.
The game has a nice retro-inspired look, but it ultimately can't save a rather dull game. If you want a great Breakout clone, play Shatter instead.
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