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Bionic Dues is a tactical, turn-based roguelite with mech customization. Out-think wide-ranging tactical situations featuring robots with bad GPS, terrible aim, insecurity, a lack of focus, a tendency to backstab, and dozens of other maladies to exploit.
Date de parution: 8 oct 2013
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Bionic Dues 1.008 (Minor Update) Released.

2 juillet 2014

This one is very very small, simply updating our Steamworks integration and fixing achievements on linux.

Enjoy!

This is a standard update that Steam will automatically download for you. However, if you want to force a quicker update and are currently running Steam, just restart Steam.

Discussion thread on the official forums.

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Articles

“What's wonderful about Bionic Dues is that it manages to combine meta-strategy and micro-strategy... It's like a fast-paced, mini-XCOM.”
Andrew Groen, The Penny Arcade Report

“Top game moment: Realising a momentary oversight has condemned you to almost certain doom, but then, with only a perfect set of well-thought long-contemplated moves, you pull everything out the bag, blow the rig, and get the hell out of dodge to receive a hard-earned mission successful.”
8.5/10 – Richard Nolan, Strategy Informer

“Bionic Dues delivers tough decisions, sweeping tactics and enormous mech battles; packing massive replayability and unpredictability into its budget price point. A 'Rogue-lite' to remember and to savour through numerous scorched-earth defeats and hard-won victories.”
8/10, Editor's Choice – Jonathan Lester, Dealspwn

À propos du jeu

Robot rebellions should be quelled by the best of the best. When the best of the best are killed... it's up to you. Subdue the uprising in time, or your corporate overlords nuke the city.

Bionic Dues is a tactical, turn-based roguelite with mech customization. Guide multiple classes of Exos through a variety of missions filled with enemy robots that are as buggy as they are angry. This is at least as bad as it sounds. Explore for loot, destroy key robotic facilities, and brace yourself for the final attack by your enemies... just as soon as they can pull it together.

Features

  • Out-think wide-ranging tactical situations featuring robots with bad GPS, terrible aim, insecurity, a lack of focus, a tendency to backstab, and dozens of other maladies to exploit.
  • Over 40 unique bots, ranging from the hilariously inept-but-dangerous DumBots, BlunderBots, and BatBots to the terrifyingly effective WyvernBots, DoomBots, and MurderBots.
  • Carve your own path: choose 30 to 50 missions out of the 120 you discover as you explore the city map. Which missions you choose determines how prepared you will be for the final battle against the massing robot army.
  • Missions come in 23 different general flavors, and are entirely procedurally-generated like a floor of a traditional roguelite.
  • Mix and match your squad of four from six classes of Exos: Assault, Siege, Science, Sniper, Ninja and Brawler. Each has its own build and weaponry.
  • Choose an overall pilot from a roster of six to add a powerful perk that lasts your entire campaign.
  • Customize your four Exos with procedurally-generated loot that grants weaponry and defensive upgrades, new abilities, and more.
  • Difficulty levels ranging from quite casual to incredibly hardcore.
  • Save and reload your game with ease any time, or tough it out in ironman mode.
  • Stellar soundtrack by composer Pablo Vega, headlined by the game's title theme "The Home We Once Knew."

Configuration requise (PC)

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP SP2 or later
    • Processor: 1.6Ghz CPU
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Screen resolution at least 720px high, and 1024px wide.
    • Hard Drive: 300 MB available space

Configuration requise (MAC)

    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OSX Intel CPU and "Leopard" 10.5 or later.
    • Processor: 1.6Ghz CPU
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Screen resolution at least 720px high, and 1024px wide.

Configuration requise (Linux)

    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 10.10 or later, although other unsupported distros may work
    • Processor: 1.6Ghz CPU
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Screen resolution at least 720px high, and 1024px wide.
    • Hard Drive: 300 MB available space
Évaluations intéressantes des utilisateurs
14 personne(s) sur 15 (93%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
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Bionic dues is a roguelike, and plays pretty similar to standard rogue games. You take an action, then everything else does, repeat untill enemies are dead or an objective is complete. You get four party members that you can switch between at any point (costs an action) but only one of them can be on the field at a time, so you're really always controlling a single hero, not a squad.

First it should be said that, like most arcen games, Bionic Dues has amazingly good music. Although they are merely adequate as a game developer, they have the amazing Pablo Vega on staff doing all their music. This is especially noticeable in the hauntingly beautiful title track, The Home That We Once Knew. A song so brilliant i'd recommend buying this game JUST to hear it, despite its other flaws. It really sets the scene and is a truly amazing first impression, sadly it's mostly downhill from there.

This game has an unfortunate problem shared by other Arcen titles, in that the game bombards you with information right from the beginning, telling you in pointlessly explicit detail about the final battle you'll eventually have and how to win it. Aside from being overwhelming and working very poorly as a tutorial, this also instantly takes away any sense of novelty or mystery from the game, and you're never really in doubt about what will eventually happen. The final battle is hyped and foreshadowed repeatedly, and warnings about it are shoved in your face constantly.

At the beginning you choose four of the six classes, and one of the six available leaders. this is probably intended to encourage replayability, but i didn't really feel any desire to play it again.

After every mission your'e rewarded with a tide of loot with witty descriptions that modify lots of stats, and you can equip your party between missions using these parts. Each squad member has 20-30 equipment slots, so you'll spend a lot of time in there tweaking with equipment loadouts, which is kind of fun at first. However after a while of playing, the system starts to feel shallow, as there's a pretty small range of values that can actually be adjusted, and thusly not much room for "builds" or any real modding strategy. You basicalyl want everyone to be reasonably tanky, and all their weapons to be strong enough to 1-shot enemies, with reasonable amounts of range and ammo. this isn't hard to accomplish.

Eventually you'll stop caring about most of the loot you get, and just briefly scan the inventory for unusually high values, there's too much of it, and once you've seen one +50% damage mod, you've seen them all. There's no unusual combinations or interesting unique equipment, just ever-increasing generic values, the novelty fades quickly.

Each squad member has a small (preset, non-changeable) selection of weapons, and with certain missions they can get a permanant upgrade which gives them additional weapons and equipment slots (again, preset). These upgrades are nice and add an interesting power spike to things, but there's exactly one for each squad member, and they're no-brainers you'll want to grab asap.


***** SPOILERS AHEAD *****
***** SPOILERS AHEAD *****
***** SPOILERS AHEAD *****


Despite the constant warnings and foreshadowing, and especially the warning that i'd have to hold off a massive assault from hundreds of enemies, the final mission was a colossal letdown. It threw a grand total of 80-ish enemies at me (there's a counter) in a single, boring mazelike interior environment, much like any other mission. There was no colossal assault, it was literally a hunt-and-destroy mission like hundreds of others. I had to go and find THEM hiding in tiny pockets of resistance, and just nuke them with aoe weapons.

I spent a long time building up a perfectly engineered sniper and engineer-scientist combo, and created a huge fort of sentry guns expecting to have to fight off thousands of bots, and maybe some colossal monster. What i got was a pathetic skirmish with only slightly more enemies than an average mission. it was a dismal and hollow end to the game. There's no real reward or sense of closure either, after the battle you jsut get a "congratulations you won, now go and relax" textbox, and the game just stops on the main map screen with nothing being clickable. No ending cutscene, no conclusion to the story, just nothing.

I spent £1.74 on this game, and my initial thoughts after buying it were that i'd gotten an amazing deal. But as the novelty wore off, that seemed like a pretty reasonable price. It's great fun for an hour or two, and mildly entertaining for a few more after that, but there's no real reason to replay it.

You should probably quit before you finish the game, and just imagine that it had a good ending.
Posté le : 21 mars 2014
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6 personne(s) sur 7 (86%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
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21 évaluations
32.9 heures en tout
Yes!

The turn-based genre (with rogouelike/rpg elements) at it's best.

Apparently the genre is on the rise again- first the Steam Marines, now this- so much tactical depth with an easy interface and loads of fun.

In Bionic Dues you get to controll bionic Mechs, you can switch between several different classes during a mission to utilize their strenghts.

-The fights are as fast as you want them (they are turn based)
-Heaps of customization options for your Mechs which greatly change the gameplay. Find or buy new items.
-Nice music!
-Randomness (MOAR replayability)
-Low price
-Several types of missions
-Funny!

a BIG + /recommendation from me
Posté le : 15 février 2014
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6 personne(s) sur 9 (67%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
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21 évaluations
3.1 heures en tout
Didn't like it as much as I thought I would. It's a turnbased strategy game with mechs where you have 50 days to prepare against unevitable doom by completeling randomly generated missions. The concept is awesome which is to be expected from Arcen Games.

The main problem I had was that the missions felt kindof like a slog and a bit samey. The combat was also pretty cutthroat. You'll usually kill the enemy in one hit and they can do the same thing to you which sounds interesting but I didn't happen to like it afterwards. In most cases you'll blow through the levels killing everything in your path and if you make one misstep, you can die. This is probably done to make the levels seem challenging but it didn't really end up that way.

I'm not sure how I'd change it to make the game more enjoyable for me. I was thinking about making the combat less binary by buffing the health of you and your enemies. Maybe instead of having one mech on the field that you can switch out, you could have a group of mechs on the field. Maybe I would've like a more "classic" strategy RPG leveling up system where you unlock skills by leveling up. It's a bit strange really. Arcen Games removed the slow grindy bits of an S-RPG but in hindsight I actually liked those slow grindy bits.
Posté le : 1 mai 2014
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2 personne(s) sur 2 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
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Great little game - had my first final assault today and my tactics worked ( I nearly had no opponents as I could destroy them in some earlier mission ). It might be that the endgame is too easy but I'll have to play again until the end to see that.
I really like random equipment and the epic advancement made me grin a lot!
I sometimes had more fun equipping my exos than fighting with them.

I don't know how good the replayability will be, and if the map changes with each game, but i'll give it a try.
Posté le : 30 mai 2014
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2 personne(s) sur 2 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
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This game plays somewhat like a roguelike dungeon crawler. You spend a turn to either move or take an action, then all the enemies do the same.

Each mission takes place in an enviroment of connected corridors and rooms where you get aggro from nearby robots and use your abilities to either avoid them or kill them. The goal of each mission is to achieve objectives, leave the map, and get diablo style prefix-item-postfix style loot, complete with color coding for rarity.

You have a team of 4 different characters (exos, human sized robots) but they all occupy the same map tile, and you can only have one active at a time. That's the twist in the particular dungeon crawling game. It takes a turn to switch between your exos, which you'll want to do because the different exos have different abilities and limited resources like ammo and hitpoints.

After each mission you can customize your exos with all that neat loot you've been finding. The various parts you find tend to be multipurpose, so there are always choices to make, both about what exo gets what part, and where on the exo to put the part.

I found the exo equiping part of the game very satisfying and had several super tricked out exos specializing in incredible shield tanking, firepower, stealth/virus attacks, and stealth/virus attacks near the end of my first game with the default character and exo setup.

Overall, I'd say this made the medium difficulty campaign fairly easy. The final mission(s) were mostly a chore to hunt down all of the bots. I've yet to replay the game, but replayability seems high since you can pick different character bonuses and exo team composisions each game. Not to mention all the random stuff.

Having played AI War, The Last Federation and Skyward Collapse, I would say Bionic Dues is my favorite Arcen game.
Posté le : 19 juillet 2014
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3 personne(s) sur 3 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
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10.4 heures en tout
Les roguelikes et moi c'est une longue et douloureuse histoire d'amour.
D'amour vache, en fait.

J'aime bien me faire écarteler, éviscérer, énucléer, et toutes sortes de verbes décrivant des actions peu avenantes et commençant de préférence par un é.

En voyant Bionic Dues, j'ai hésité. Longuement. Genre euh... C'est moche, c'est illisible tant c'est fouillis, c'est en plus squad-based... Tout pour me déplaire.

Mais bon, d'un autre côté, c'est Arcen. Genre les mêmes qui pondent des trucs moches à carrément hideux, brouillons au possible, mal torchés mais toujours à tout le moins intrigants, à tout le mieux fantastiques. Y'a qu'à voir Skyward Collapse ou AI War pour s'en convaincre.

Alors je me suis dit que j'allais tout de même sauter le pas.

Et tout confirme l'AOC du jeu : c'est absolument dégueulasse artistiquement parlant - c'est un fatras inconcevable d'artworks douteux que ta petite sœur de 5 ans ferait mieux (oui, les portraits, c'est vous que je regarde) ; c'est absolument répugnant de détails inutiles qui gênent la lisibilité de l'écran - point ô combien important pour un roguelike ou apparenté ; la musique est partiellement resucée des autres titres d'Arcen et, en parlant de titre, la musique de l'écran éponyme est à tomber la mâchoire tant c'est du grand n'importe quoi ; les vannes sont sympas mais les voix des robots après la dixième partie donnent juste envie de balancer sa pauvre bécane par la fenêtre ; la voix d'écran post-mission finit par faire chier.

En d'autres termes : j'adore ce jeu.

J'adore ce jeu parce que passé outre tous ces désagréments (et mieux vaut ne pas s'y méprendre : tant la direction artistique que le theme immonde plairont forcément à certains), on touche le cœur du jeu ; et du cœur, le bouzin en a à revendre.

En fait de squad-based, c'est plutôt d'un groupe de 4 mechas qu'il s'agit, dont un seul apparaît à l'écran à tout moment donné, interchangeable à tout moment au prix d'un point d'action - d'un tour, en d'autres termes.
Les ennemis sont variés, la difficulté est bien présente pour peu qu'on ne joue pas dans les modes les plus faciles, les surprises sont nombreuses et la plupart des poncifs du genre sont respectés d'une manière ou d'une autre. Ainsi, à défaut de parchemins et de potions, l'on disposera de terminaux hackables à tout moment et réservant - paraît-il - autant de bonnes que de mauvaises surprises (même si ça me paraît grandement surfait, je n'ai pas encore croisé le moindre terminal à effet bénéfique... Mais avec ma chance, je ne jurerais pas qu'on nous a menti).

C'est fluide, c'est prise de tête, les mechas sont customisables à l'envi avec le loot récolté en mission (missions dont la variété est tout à fait convenable).

En d'autres termes, si les amateurs de mechas ne trouveront pas forcément leur bonheur par ici, les amoureux de Rogue et autres punitions anales vidéoludiques devraient se voir comblés.

Si l'on devait donner une note à cette chose, ce serait probablement un 7 oursins sur 4 endives. Ce qui n'est pas mal du tout, tout bien considéré.
Posté le : 24 novembre 2013
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