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Bionic Dues is a tactical, turn-based roguelite with mech customization. Out-think wide-ranging tactical situations featuring robots with bad GPS, terrible aim, insecurity, a lack of focus, a tendency to backstab, and dozens of other maladies to exploit.
发行日期: 2013年10月8日
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Bionic Dues Official 1.101 "PerformanceBot" Released!

9月17日

This one includes drastically increases the graphical performance for the game.

It also has a few bugfixes, and two new conducts: Shorter Campaign and Random Exos.

Enjoy!

Click here for the official forum discussion about this release.

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Bionic Dues Official 1.100 Released!

8月26日

This one includes the real images for the new achievements (many thanks to community member nas1m for working on these!) and a single small bugfix for the shotgun.

Steam integration for the new achievements will come soon, and won't require a further client-side update.

And that will mark the end of the 1.1 cycle. Hopefully another beta cycle will start breaking things again soon, but either way 1.1 should be a good stable version for folks to enjoy until it's time for another official.

Enjoy!

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评测

“What's wonderful about Bionic Dues is that it manages to combine meta-strategy and micro-strategy... It's like a fast-paced, mini-XCOM.”
Andrew Groen, The Penny Arcade Report

“Top game moment: Realising a momentary oversight has condemned you to almost certain doom, but then, with only a perfect set of well-thought long-contemplated moves, you pull everything out the bag, blow the rig, and get the hell out of dodge to receive a hard-earned mission successful.”
8.5/10 – Richard Nolan, Strategy Informer

“Bionic Dues delivers tough decisions, sweeping tactics and enormous mech battles; packing massive replayability and unpredictability into its budget price point. A 'Rogue-lite' to remember and to savour through numerous scorched-earth defeats and hard-won victories.”
8/10, Editor's Choice – Jonathan Lester, Dealspwn

关于游戏

Robot rebellions should be quelled by the best of the best. When the best of the best are killed... it's up to you. Subdue the uprising in time, or your corporate overlords nuke the city.

Bionic Dues is a tactical, turn-based roguelite with mech customization. Guide multiple classes of Exos through a variety of missions filled with enemy robots that are as buggy as they are angry. This is at least as bad as it sounds. Explore for loot, destroy key robotic facilities, and brace yourself for the final attack by your enemies... just as soon as they can pull it together.

Features

  • Out-think wide-ranging tactical situations featuring robots with bad GPS, terrible aim, insecurity, a lack of focus, a tendency to backstab, and dozens of other maladies to exploit.
  • Over 40 unique bots, ranging from the hilariously inept-but-dangerous DumBots, BlunderBots, and BatBots to the terrifyingly effective WyvernBots, DoomBots, and MurderBots.
  • Carve your own path: choose 30 to 50 missions out of the 120 you discover as you explore the city map. Which missions you choose determines how prepared you will be for the final battle against the massing robot army.
  • Missions come in 23 different general flavors, and are entirely procedurally-generated like a floor of a traditional roguelite.
  • Mix and match your squad of four from six classes of Exos: Assault, Siege, Science, Sniper, Ninja and Brawler. Each has its own build and weaponry.
  • Choose an overall pilot from a roster of six to add a powerful perk that lasts your entire campaign.
  • Customize your four Exos with procedurally-generated loot that grants weaponry and defensive upgrades, new abilities, and more.
  • Difficulty levels ranging from quite casual to incredibly hardcore.
  • Save and reload your game with ease any time, or tough it out in ironman mode.
  • Stellar soundtrack by composer Pablo Vega, headlined by the game's title theme "The Home We Once Knew."

系统需求(PC)

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP SP2 or later
    • Processor: 1.6Ghz CPU
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Screen resolution at least 720px high, and 1024px wide.
    • Hard Drive: 300 MB available space

系统需求(MAC)

    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OSX Intel CPU and "Leopard" 10.5 or later.
    • Processor: 1.6Ghz CPU
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Screen resolution at least 720px high, and 1024px wide.

系统需求(Linux)

    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 10.10 or later, although other unsupported distros may work
    • Processor: 1.6Ghz CPU
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Screen resolution at least 720px high, and 1024px wide.
    • Hard Drive: 300 MB available space
有价值的用户评测
6 人中有 6 人(100%)觉得这篇评测有价值
22.4 小时(记录在案的)
一款被大众埋没的好游戏。制作组Arcen Games在业界也算是名气不小了,之前的AI War有着当下最好最难以捉摸的游戏AI,但Bionic Dues却反过来写了一大堆非常笨的AI,大部分敌人发现玩家以后都会无视一切陷阱用最短路径冲过来,而每个敌人的和特殊行动模式在描述里都有写,还会有拖后腿或者有严重设计缺陷的种类(当然也有能力很恶心玩家的种类),这些就是用来给玩家看透并加以利用的,加上玩家攻击通常100%命中,以及攻击伤害和对方血量的完全透明,大范围的扫描还会公开周围敌人的所有信息,地图和敌人定下来以后根本不用看脸,给出了充足的计算余地,这么硬派的策略游戏哪里去找?

游戏背景和AI War类似,就是一些幸存者要去战海量的机器人,不过这次地点限定在一个城市里面,而玩起则来很像Dungeon of Dredmor或者ToME4之类的经典Roguelike游戏,但并没有永久死亡,全灭导致任务失败仅仅是浪费一天游戏内时间而已,有硬汉模式但也不过是取消SL罢了(作者管这个叫Soft-Roguelike)。大地图模式则有点像FTL,在有限的时间内不停踩点来加强自己以应对最后的Boss战,不过每个地点的奖励方式是公开的,如何规划大地图移动也是策略的一部分。玩家并没有能力升级,开局选一个辅助机师和四个遥控机甲(有六种可选,而且这四个并不是同时行动的,只是相互切换而已),于是从头到尾的武器能力已经定死了,中间做任务会有一次追加武器的机会,但效果也是固定的,剩下的就是靠装备提升数字了(但自定义空间依然不少,需要平衡每个武器的能力以及抗打击性,还要兼顾病毒点数、黑客点数、潜行点数、炮塔、地雷、侦测范围等辅助能力)。

但游戏有个明显的缺点就是模式单一,所有任务的核心都是清怪(当然,谁让这是Roguelike),而没有能力追加让玩家失去期待不停重复类似的战术说实话玩久了会闷,加上视觉上也很容易审美疲劳(所有机械都一个风格,场景也就那么一个),而且一周目就是不让玩家死到最终Boss战会花上10小时左右,估计坚持下来的并不会太多。另外难度等级影响很大,普通以下根本是在浪费时间,普通难度只要不作死基本还是稳胜,困难则是稍有挑战,专家就需要不停猥琐,后期敌人属性夸张让人绝望(理论上计划好还是能赢的),而再往上还有一个自虐用难度,一般人根本不需要考虑……

简而言之,虽然没有永死,但作为Roguelike游戏解决了脸黑意外死亡的问题,而且提供了非常大的策略规划空间,其实是非常值得推荐的,当然前提是你得喜欢Roguelike式的战斗和自我挑战才行,不然不停的踢门清怪和单一场景很容易让人无聊。
发布于:4月4日
这篇评测是否有价值?
3 人中有 1 人(33%)觉得这篇评测有价值
1.2 小时(记录在案的)
平衡性糟糕
发布于:6月7日
这篇评测是否有价值?
43 人中有 30 人(70%)觉得这篇评测有价值
24.1 小时(记录在案的)
While the basic formula for a rougelike strategy game is here, Bionic Dues ultimately falls short due to balancing issues, bad information management, and generally poor presentation.

Walls of text and disorganized information are repeated issues in Bionic Dues — a problem that begins as soon as you begin your campaign. With no introduction, you're shown a screen with the portraits of four exos (your remote-controlled mechs) and a pilot, and are asked to select your team for the rest of the game. You can only take four of six exos with you; and can only select one pilot of, again, six. Each exo is armed differently, though you're only given a small description of their capabilities on a hovering text box. The same goes for the pilots: each their own brief backstory, and a special ability that affects the performance of the team. "+50% to all propulsion stats—" "A Mark-4 part will have stats like a Mark-6—" "He was able to sneak into the Bahamut Device installations—" But you've been given no story and have no idea what the gameplay is like yet. What's a Mark-6? What does the propulsion stat do? What's a Bahamut Device? None of this has any context, so you're just guessing at what might make an effective team and hoping for the best. If you later don't like your choices — well, tough; you're stuck with it.

Upon selecting your team, you're dumped into a map screen and given a one-page briefing of the situation and your mission. It's then explained that the city is under attack by a robot rebellion, and as the sole remaining pilot, it's up to you to prevent annihilation. That's the extent of your story. No characters are introduced, your pilot is never addressed by name, and the voiceover guy doesn't even explain who he is. As no real world-building is done, and your choice of pilot has no effect on the extremely-minimal story, it makes the whole process of choosing a pilot superfluous. Who cares what their names are, what they look like, or what very brief backstory they each have when it doesn't change anything in the campaign and is never addressed again? "Choose your pilot" could have easily been "choose your buff," then addressed the player, themselves, as the pilot of the exos.

Pressing OK clears the introductory text, and then several more bulletpoints of information are thrown on screen at once, explaining several basic gameplay mechanics before they're necessary. You can go straight to a mission, but the screen is flanked by icons of your exos and enemy bots, with a big green arrow reading "Customize" pointing to your team. Clicking on that gives you another text box of info, and behind it, way more info as you're shown the stats of each exo and every item in your inventory. This was the biggest and most repeated problem encountered: just way too much disorganized information at once, often without context. Each exo has 14 base stats to keep track of, and then as many as five weapons with up to 23 more stats, determined by equipping items to a potential 30 inventory slots.

Get used to the customization screen; with up to 50 missions in the campaign, you'll be spending a lot of time here between fights. This does allow you to specialize each exo with careful delegation of items and theory-crafting, but eventually I got tired of sinking so much time into figuring out exactly which item would be best-equipped where and on which exo, with so many possibilities and little nuances, that I skipped it unless I picked up something that was an obviously big upgrade. This may have been easier with better information management, but everything in this game comes as a wall of text in the same typeface. There's very little colour differentiation, and absolutely no graphics or icons used for quick identification. I started skipping the customization, because it wasn't fun; it felt like homework. However, you can only neglect dedicating yourself to this process so much, as the enemy forces get stronger with every mission. Do it, or eventually you will be outclassed.

See how much information is written here so far? We haven't even gotten to the first mission yet. Each mission is represented on the map by a different icon branching outwards from your headquarters. You have to complete them in succession to explore the city, until the final battle on the fiftieth day. Bionic Dues outright tells you that the final battle is on day 50, which is unsuspenseful. Your basic objective is to grind through the missions, upgrading your exos with loot and potentially weakening the enemy forces in preparation for one final and massive battle of attrition. If you mess up enough along the way, you can reach that final day, fail the battle, and lose the whole campaign.

The battles are turn-based. Your team has to explore a randomly-generated, grid-based battlefield, eliminating enemy robots and potentially destroying certain objectives along the way. All four exos move together on the same grid point, like an old RPG party. Only one of them is active at a time, and that will be the one who can fight and take damage. Moving, firing, using a special ability, or switching between exos takes one turn. Most of the enemies will remain inactive until you aggro them, and then they'll each take their turn after you make your move. They're not particularly challenging; most bots can be dispatched easily by being outranged or lead into traps. However, if you're not tactical, there are times where you can find yourself flanked, cornered, and overwhelmed. You can lose one of your exos in an instant with a poor choice of moves. So what happens then? Can you repair the exo, or is there some sort of penalty? Do you need to replace it, or go through the rest of the campaign with only three on your team? The game never explains, beyond that you'll receive one less piece of loot at the end of the mission.

The way each battle plays out varies depending on the type of mission, represented by the icon on the map screen. For example, some turn all destructable objects into powerful explosives, some have hostages that must be protected, and some power up every exo and bot to perform one-hit kills. This adds a little gameplay variety. However, the battlefields, themselves, are visually very bland and repetitive. They all take place indoors, and the scenery doesn't change from one part of the city to the other. Their dark grey floor colouring offers low contrast from the black, unnavigable negative space, sometimes making it hard to distinguish where you can and can't move your exos.

Once you complete your objective, you have to navigate to the exit of the level. While this does give a chance to explore and pick up any missed loot, this is often dull, as the main objective and the exit aren't necessarily going to be placed nearby each other. Often you'll find yourself navigating empty corridors as you search for the way out, which may not be easy to find. The exit isn't an actual physical exit from the battlespace, but a circle on one of the tiles, which may be hard to spot at times when it's in the fog-of-war shadow. Poor contrast plays an issue here again. Making it to the exit, in itself, is anticlimactic. You'll be immediately dumped back to the map screen, with no victory fanfare or continuation of a story.

Once you've done that, go spend a while calculating how to best upgrade your exos, then repeat the process 48 more times to make it to the final battle. There's no build-up to this moment — it's treated the same as every other mission. The final battle is an endurance run, pitting your four exos against the remanants of the enemy bot army, or as many as can fit in the map at once. It's not harder, just longer. And once you win, your reward? A "congratulations" text box. Then you just sit on the map screen. That's it.

While the basics are here, Bionic Dues falls short, still having massive room for improvement in its gameplay and presentation. Not recommended.
发布于:6月22日
这篇评测是否有价值?
24 人中有 15 人(63%)觉得这篇评测有价值
23.3 小时(记录在案的)
Do you want to play with some mecs? Do you like strat games? then i have a deal for you! Come play Bionic Dues! where you will have fun the entire way, saving hostages. blowing up factories. You may think everything is easy, until you get to the final part of the game where there are thousands of enemies to kill. and there all pointing there guns are you >.<

8/10

enjoy ^-^
发布于:8月7日
这篇评测是否有价值?
3 人中有 3 人(100%)觉得这篇评测有价值
12.7 小时(记录在案的)
This game plays somewhat like a roguelike dungeon crawler. You spend a turn to either move or take an action, then all the enemies do the same.

Each mission takes place in an enviroment of connected corridors and rooms where you get aggro from nearby robots and use your abilities to either avoid them or kill them. The goal of each mission is to achieve objectives, leave the map, and get diablo style prefix-item-postfix style loot, complete with color coding for rarity.

You have a team of 4 different characters (exos, human sized robots) but they all occupy the same map tile, and you can only have one active at a time. That's the twist in the particular dungeon crawling game. It takes a turn to switch between your exos, which you'll want to do because the different exos have different abilities and limited resources like ammo and hitpoints.

After each mission you can customize your exos with all that neat loot you've been finding. The various parts you find tend to be multipurpose, so there are always choices to make, both about what exo gets what part, and where on the exo to put the part.

I found the exo equiping part of the game very satisfying and had several super tricked out exos specializing in incredible shield tanking, firepower, stealth/virus attacks, and stealth/virus attacks near the end of my first game with the default character and exo setup.

Overall, I'd say this made the medium difficulty campaign fairly easy. The final mission(s) were mostly a chore to hunt down all of the bots. I've yet to replay the game, but replayability seems high since you can pick different character bonuses and exo team composisions each game. Not to mention all the random stuff.

Having played AI War, The Last Federation and Skyward Collapse, I would say Bionic Dues is my favorite Arcen game.
发布于:7月19日
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