Raise massive armies, embark on epic campaigns to expand the Empire, and take control of the known world! Engage in grand-scale city building and create magnificent cities with creativity and control like never before.
Évaluations des utilisateurs :
Globales :
plutôt positives (314 évaluation(s)) - 72% des 314 évaluations des utilisateurs pour ce jeu sont positives.
Date de parution : 20 mar 2009

Connectez-vous pour ajouter cet article à votre liste de souhaits, le suivre, ou indiquer que vous n'êtes pas intéressé

Acheter Grand Ages: Rome

Packages qui comprennent ce jeu

Acheter Grand Ages: Rome GOLD

Comprend le jeu Grand Ages: Rome et Grand Ages: Rome - Reign of Augustus

 

À propos de ce jeu

Vous êtes le gouverneur Romain d'une Province de l'Empire. Son destin est entre vos mains. Choisissez votre personnage parmi les familles et accomplissez vos missions. Combattez les barbares, faites des échanges avec d'autres cultures, construisez les fondements d'une économie prospère et faites en sorte que votre peuple soit comblé. Jouez seul la campagne ou à plusieurs en mode multijoueur.
Rome ne s'est pas faite en un jour !
  • Mode coopératif multijoueur — Jouez avec vos amis sur l'internet. Chaque joueur peut créer et étendre sa cité ou en mode par équipe vous pouvez construire une cité à plusieurs.
  • Mode compétitif multijoueur — Jouez contre vos amis jusqu'à 6 joueurs en modes "Last Man Standing", "King of the Hill", "Monument Victory", "100,000 Denarii", "Last Barbarians" et "All In One"
  • Personnages persistants — L'immobilier et les habilités du joueur sont sauvegardés et utilisés dans d'autres missions en mode solo comme en mode multijoueur.
  • Campagne non linéaires avec 40 missions historiques.
  • 60+ bâtiments
  • 50+ unités — citoyens, animaux, unités militaires.
  • Combat naval et colonisation des îles.
  • Nouvelle organisation de l'économie — facilité d'utilisation des outils pour accéder aux ressources.
  • États cités — Effets spéciaux : âge d'or, émeutes, peste...
  • Recherche — 30 technologies qui rapportent de nouveaux bâtiments, des unités militaires...
  • Castes — Esclaves, plébéiens, équités et patriciens.
  • Système de combat avec contrôle en temps réel des unités.
  • Les unités militaires gagnent de l'expérience avec le temps.
  • Les informations affichées vous renseignent sur l'état de votre société.
  • Monument nationaux : le Colisée, le Circus Maximus, et le Panthéon

Configuration requise

    • Interface : Windows® XP & Vista
    • Processeur : CPU avec 2 - 2.5GHz
    • Mémoire : 1 Go RAM
    • Disque dur: 4 Go
    • Graphismes : Carte 3D avec 128 Mo Ram
    • DirectX® Version: 9c
Évaluations des utilisateurs
Le système d'évaluations des utilisateurs a été mis à jour ! En savoir plus
Globales :
plutôt positives (314 évaluation(s))
Publiées récemment
madsny
( 2.0 heures en tout )
Posté le : 25 juin
5/10

Grand ages is actually a well polished game with a solid tutorial, but i went into this game hoping, it's was an age of empire kind of RTS game, which may explain my dislike of this game, i fell constrained while playing, specific buildings needs to be within regions of each other to work, farms much use predefined areas to grow fields, the game uses a kind of real-time economy system, meaning you can't store resources for a specific job etc. in all fairness the mechanics works well, but i often found myself, having to micromanage building-placement rather than concerning about the greater scheme of things, for me.

Graphics and sound is top notch, lush colors and great 3D assets, you feel like taking a stroll in your city, the navigation is kind of okay, but a bit slow at times.

if your hoping for an replacement to Age of empires, this is properly not for you.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Audish
( 2.2 heures en tout )
Posté le : 22 juin
Grand Ages: Rome is very unique as far as sequels go. The follow-up to Imperium Romanum looks and sounds very similar, but features entirely different systems under the hood. It's a bit off-putting at first because they're not necessarily improvements, just very different. There's no clear superior between them, but a little time with this game will is bound to hook you for a good long while.

The meat of Grand Ages is its campaign, featuring a wealth of scenarios that challenge you to raise and manage a Roman colony somewhere in the empire. You generally start with a single outpost, and from that singular beginning expand with homes, farms, shops, arenas, theaters, and more. Every scenario has a very clear objective that you must accomplish, this time without the quirks and surprises of Imperium Romanum's tablet system. As you provide services to your plebeians you gain the resources needed to build more prosperous homes, which in turn can manage more complex services. It's a very simple hierarchy of structures to work through, so most of your concern will be on finding space for them all.

What won't be much of a concern is managing your resources, because they're on a much more streamlined system than in the previous game. Instead of producing and stockpiling goods, each resource building provides a permanent, static number of resources for your settlement. That means building a logging camp produces 10 logs, full stop. When you build a new building, however, it doesn't subtract from that number. If a house says it needs 4 logs and 4 bricks, you just need to have more than that threshold to build however many you want. What DOES subtract from your resource pools are upkeep costs, usually 1 or 2 units of a few resources per building.

Trading also reduces your thresholds in exchange for denarii, currency needed for construction and upkeep. Money works more traditionally, being earned over time and spent directly from your coffers. You'll need to pay a bit of attention to your economy so as to not go bankrupt, but even if you fall into the red you just enter a warning state where you have ten minutes to get back into the black. Your settlement can enter a lot of interesting states like this by building in certain ways, including building frenzies that speed up construction, divine blessings that improve services, and more. It's a nice touch that encourages you to find different ways to expand, and can really change up your strategies.

Combat plays a larger role in Grand Ages, but units are a little easier to build and command, and the combat is more interesting with additions like experience levels. You can access military and other improvements through the research system, which simply requires a school to start with. The campaign also has a really cool progression feature in your character, who can level up and earn family wealth between scenarios. These resources can be used to unlock skills that improve your buildings or military, or buy estates that provide you with additional starting resources. This system does a lot to expand your options, even allowing you to find shortcuts past particularly troublesome resources.

There's a lot of improvements to take in, but not without a few drawbacks. As streamlined as the new resource system is, it responds much worse to surprises than the old one. Should you lose buildings to fires or angry gods (yes that can happen, build lots of temples!) when you are low on a particular resource, you might not have a clear path to rebuilding them. Fires are also much more common because riots now guarantee that at least a handful of buildings will be destroyed, so keeping your people happy is crucial this time around. You may also find yourself bee-lining to certain buildings even if they're not optimal for your city because of scenario objectives and the hard caps your resource thresholds provide.

It's just as pretty a game as Imperium Romanum, and shares the same quality audio and soundtrack to enjoy. The camera is a little harder to get nice screencaps with, but they're worth doing with the more detailed buildings. In the end, I can't really say which is the better game. Imperium Romanum has a little more personality with its individual citizens, and a little more flexibility with its resource stockpiles. Grand Ages: Rome feels more streamlined and polished, and adds some really interesting progression systems. Fans of more abstracted builders like SimCity will probably enjoy this one more, but no matter which you pick I'm confident you'll find something to like.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Awesomo 2000
( 1.6 heures en tout )
Posté le : 14 juin
Truthfully I enjoyed Imperium Romanum little more, I feel like they added too much features to this game that werent really necessary since the game worked well in previous title. Still it is pretty good strategy building game, especially to those who love the history of Roman empire.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
WvW647
( 5.4 heures en tout )
Posté le : 10 juin
SUPEEEEEER GAMEEEEE
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
ivy
( 0.7 heures en tout )
Posté le : 2 juin
dislike
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Trickle
( 35.4 heures en tout )
Évaluation avant sortie
Posté le : 2 juin
Pretty relaxing game and good value when on sale. I hit 35 hours and probably got about 1/2 way through before getting to the point of it starting to feel more chore like. So certainly a flawed game, but it starts off so pleasingly casual its worth the $5.


Fun early on and against the price it gets a thumbs up.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
GameMaster
( 35.5 heures en tout )
Posté le : 21 mai
Have to say this game isn't really bad, I Hvae enjoyed the campaign quite a bit but after 21 mission it really started to get boring, it was the same thing over again, build city achieve this goal, with bonus missions that will pressure you or limit you. The combat in this game is okish for what it is, as you won't see much of it. I would compared this game with am Anno game 75% is i city managment 20% in economics and 5% combat. But in the end if you want to create the perfet Roman city this game will definatly be up you alley.

Good Points
-Long campaign
-Can be challenging
-Good City mangament system
-Ok Combat
-Decent Economy
Bad Points
-Become Very Repetitive

Final Score 7/10
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
pjvanrijn01
( 3.1 heures en tout )
Posté le : 15 mai
Nice game, but after 3 hours I got almost continue lag
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Mechalic
( 249.8 heures en tout )
Posté le : 7 mai
Absolutely LOVE this game! 10/10

This game seems to be the last in the line of realistic ancient city builders (there have been none since)
- Grand Ages Medieval is a stain on the Grand Ages name and is not a city builder nor set in ancient times.

First up, game runs amazing on Ultra graphics on Windows 10 (if you were unsure it it would run)
- Excellent level of detail, allows you to build beautiful Roman cities, the economy of the game works similar to anno games, I recently spent over 12 hours non stop on the most spectacular city.

If you love history and appreciate the advancements and might that was the Roman Republic/Empire, then you will love this game in all it's detail!
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
SexyFeet
( 17.4 heures en tout )
Posté le : 7 mai
Grand Ages: Rome is one of a very few city building games that satisfies the player's desire to SEE how awesome their work was. This game might have been released some time ago now (2009), but the level of detail is very satisfying. Zooming right down into your city center and watching the hustle and bustle of a Roman city feels -so- good. Very few city builders give you this feeling, with games like SimCity almost reaching the same feeling but falling a little bit short. I also appreciate the accuracy of Roman architecture and culture that this game has. GA:R is designed in such a way that cities the player builds don't look like a player-built city; putting a few hours into a level can make it look like a dev-designed city! As someone who values immersion and depth of detail more than anything in strategy games, GR:A has a special place in my heart for the visual appeal.

One thing I gripe about, though; the size of levels/plots are somewhat small. Upon purchasing and booting the game up, I was expecting something pseudo-open world, or even something where cities are connected in some way (I.E SimCity 2014, where city plots are pretty close together and connected via highways, trade, airports etc.), but unfortunately every plot is an individual gamestate. The military side of the game is also very limited - I feel that the advertisement point of "build massive armies" is a large overstatement. On some plots/levels, there is no actual point to building military structures and units. I'd love it if there were factions in this game that you partook in actual diplomacy with, but this game doesn't use these systems at all. It's entirely about loading up a city plot and building - a sandbox with objectives, if you will.

Pros:

-Amazing visual dazzle and grandure

-Respects and keeps to the Rome of classical times

-Very liberating in terms of customisation and building

-Decent military aspect, but limited

-Good use of resource management/trade

Cons:

-Closed off game world

-Lack of open-world grandure

8/10. Right up there with Anno City-Builders!
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Évaluations les plus pertinentes  Dans les 30 derniers jours
6 personne(s) sur 6 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
2.2 heures en tout
Posté le : 22 juin
Grand Ages: Rome is very unique as far as sequels go. The follow-up to Imperium Romanum looks and sounds very similar, but features entirely different systems under the hood. It's a bit off-putting at first because they're not necessarily improvements, just very different. There's no clear superior between them, but a little time with this game will is bound to hook you for a good long while.

The meat of Grand Ages is its campaign, featuring a wealth of scenarios that challenge you to raise and manage a Roman colony somewhere in the empire. You generally start with a single outpost, and from that singular beginning expand with homes, farms, shops, arenas, theaters, and more. Every scenario has a very clear objective that you must accomplish, this time without the quirks and surprises of Imperium Romanum's tablet system. As you provide services to your plebeians you gain the resources needed to build more prosperous homes, which in turn can manage more complex services. It's a very simple hierarchy of structures to work through, so most of your concern will be on finding space for them all.

What won't be much of a concern is managing your resources, because they're on a much more streamlined system than in the previous game. Instead of producing and stockpiling goods, each resource building provides a permanent, static number of resources for your settlement. That means building a logging camp produces 10 logs, full stop. When you build a new building, however, it doesn't subtract from that number. If a house says it needs 4 logs and 4 bricks, you just need to have more than that threshold to build however many you want. What DOES subtract from your resource pools are upkeep costs, usually 1 or 2 units of a few resources per building.

Trading also reduces your thresholds in exchange for denarii, currency needed for construction and upkeep. Money works more traditionally, being earned over time and spent directly from your coffers. You'll need to pay a bit of attention to your economy so as to not go bankrupt, but even if you fall into the red you just enter a warning state where you have ten minutes to get back into the black. Your settlement can enter a lot of interesting states like this by building in certain ways, including building frenzies that speed up construction, divine blessings that improve services, and more. It's a nice touch that encourages you to find different ways to expand, and can really change up your strategies.

Combat plays a larger role in Grand Ages, but units are a little easier to build and command, and the combat is more interesting with additions like experience levels. You can access military and other improvements through the research system, which simply requires a school to start with. The campaign also has a really cool progression feature in your character, who can level up and earn family wealth between scenarios. These resources can be used to unlock skills that improve your buildings or military, or buy estates that provide you with additional starting resources. This system does a lot to expand your options, even allowing you to find shortcuts past particularly troublesome resources.

There's a lot of improvements to take in, but not without a few drawbacks. As streamlined as the new resource system is, it responds much worse to surprises than the old one. Should you lose buildings to fires or angry gods (yes that can happen, build lots of temples!) when you are low on a particular resource, you might not have a clear path to rebuilding them. Fires are also much more common because riots now guarantee that at least a handful of buildings will be destroyed, so keeping your people happy is crucial this time around. You may also find yourself bee-lining to certain buildings even if they're not optimal for your city because of scenario objectives and the hard caps your resource thresholds provide.

It's just as pretty a game as Imperium Romanum, and shares the same quality audio and soundtrack to enjoy. The camera is a little harder to get nice screencaps with, but they're worth doing with the more detailed buildings. In the end, I can't really say which is the better game. Imperium Romanum has a little more personality with its individual citizens, and a little more flexibility with its resource stockpiles. Grand Ages: Rome feels more streamlined and polished, and adds some really interesting progression systems. Fans of more abstracted builders like SimCity will probably enjoy this one more, but no matter which you pick I'm confident you'll find something to like.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
2 personne(s) sur 2 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
1.6 heures en tout
Posté le : 14 juin
Truthfully I enjoyed Imperium Romanum little more, I feel like they added too much features to this game that werent really necessary since the game worked well in previous title. Still it is pretty good strategy building game, especially to those who love the history of Roman empire.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
2 personne(s) sur 2 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
35.4 heures en tout
Évaluation avant sortie
Posté le : 2 juin
Pretty relaxing game and good value when on sale. I hit 35 hours and probably got about 1/2 way through before getting to the point of it starting to feel more chore like. So certainly a flawed game, but it starts off so pleasingly casual its worth the $5.


Fun early on and against the price it gets a thumbs up.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
Évaluations les plus pertinentes  Globales
12 personne(s) sur 12 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
2 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Recommandé
11.4 heures en tout
Posté le : 18 mars 2014
Un bon jeu sympathique avec lequel on s'amuse bien, je vous le conseille. Les graphismes sans être époustouflant sont jouable et agréable, le jeu est assez facile de prise en main, si il y a besoin il y a un petit guide avec l'utilité des bâtiments... Au début, on peut avoir un peu de mal mais les marques se prennent assez vite. Le prix est pas assez éxcessif et cela vaut le coup de mettre un peu d'argent dedans. Alors amusez-vous bien avec ce jeu! et si vous avez besoin d'aide, n'hésitez pas!
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
5 personne(s) sur 5 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
3.5 heures en tout
Posté le : 15 mars 2014
Un excellent jeu mêlant brillamment l’aspect citybuilder avec gestion des armées et batailles en temps réel.
Graphiquement pas vilain pour un jeu de 2009 (avec en plus un zoom de folie), ce titre me rappele les sensations des premiers age of empires.
Je recommande !
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
8 personne(s) sur 12 (67%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
1 personne a trouvé cette évaluation amusante
Non recommandé
26.1 heures en tout
Posté le : 31 mai 2015
Ce jeu n'est pas fait pour tout le monde, mais il peut être asser plaisant pour ceux qui aime ce style...

J'ai toujours eu de la difficulté avec les jeux qui font tout apparaître par magie, aucun travailleur n'apparte de matériaux, tout fonctionne par rayon d'action, pour agrandir, vous devez contruire un autre bâtiment au bout du rayon d'action, ect, ça rend les jeux morne et sans vie...

pour ce qui est de la gestion des ressources aussi, bien que ce soit plus façile qu'un simulatewur de vie, le jeu fonctionne par flux pour les matériaux, c'est à dire que vous n'avez aucun besoin de calculer ou de vérifier la distance, peut importe l'endroit où vous le bâtisser, vous aurer toujours la quantité indiqué, aucunne variante, vous voyer du monde y travailler mais il ne sont pas pris en compte, les matériaux apparaissent par magie dans vos entrepôt...

pour ce qui est des entepôt, même chose, aucunne intéraction possible, tout ce fait par magie et tout est stocké et utilisé par magie sans que vous ne voyez quoi que ce soit bouger...

pour ce qui est du commerce, et bien c'est la même chose, vous savez que vous aver 5 unité de tel type qui apparaisse par magie dans vos entrepôt et vous en utilisé 2, donc vous dite seulement au marché de vendre les trois autre, et il sont commercer par magie sans aucunne intéraction...

pour ma part je trouve ce jeu absolument morne, c'est du "cliquer et placer"...

mais pour ceux qui aime ce style de jeu, ce jeu offre beaucoup de chose,

un petit arbre des technologie à dévellopper, militaire, bâtiment et famille..., pour les familles (vous en choississer une au départ, qui offre chacunne un arbre de technologie différente dans la section famille qui vous donne divers avantage selon la famille choisi,

les ressources ne sont pas si nombreuse mais chaque ressource à sa chaîne de production, comme pour faire du pain, vous avez besoin de blé qui est fournit par le moulin qui lui prend son grain du fermier, et chaque bâtiment qui à besoin des matière de l'autre doit ce trouver dans son rayon d'action, ect...

mais comme tout ce fait par magie, et bien les ressource sont illimité, et un seul entrepôt peut tout contenir, si vous construiser une mine, pas besoin de ce soucier du nombre de travailleur, ainsi que de la production où de la distance, tout ce fait par magie et tout est téléporter à l'endroit ou il en ont de besoin, aucun travailleur n'a besoin d'acheminé son bien à l'autre, ça c'est ce que je trouve qui fait le plus mal à ce type de jeu car sa tue complètement le style "gestion" c'est plus un système de gestion pour enfant, 1+1=2

Pour ce qui est du côté militaire, vous avez un contrôle total sur les unité militaires, vous pouvez les entraîners, et différent style d'unité peuvent être créer...

pour la construction des bâtiment c'est par magie aussi, vous dite où vous le voulez et le batiment apparait sans que les ouvrier apporte les matériaux, par contre un compte à rebour est la pour essayé de simulé le temp de construction, et selon le type de bâtiment il peut être plus lent ou plus vite...

les graphiques sont correcte, il m'arrivait de prendre le temps de regardé les gens marcher, pour ce qui est des bâtiment, vous pouvez regarder les gens travailler mais ceux-çi n'ont aucun impact sur le jeu, il ne sont là que pour la décoration puisque tout ce fait par "Flux" de données, donc même si ça lui prend cinq minutes pour apporter un abre à l'usine, si vous en recever 25 par minute automatiquement, et bien vous continuer à en recevoir 25 par minute même si ça lui prend une journée pour apporté un arbre...

pour ce qui est de la civilisation, et bien c'est un système basique de rayon d'action, si votre bâtiment se trouve dans le rayon d'action tout est ok, pas besoin de penser aux travailleur et au temp qu'il prenne pour fournir le service, tout ce fait par magie et le service est fournit à tout les bâtiment autour peut importe la quantité de population que vous avez...

bref, c'est un jeu de gestion de base, mais pas de simulation, qui comme je l'ai indiqué plus haut peut plaire à certain et sembler plus morne pour d'autre, ce qui est mon cas, mais ceci ne veut pas dire que le jeu est mauvais, mais disons qu'il y à beaucoup d'autre jeu au sujet de rome et qui offre une gestion plus réaliste d'un vraie jeu de gestion et de simulation, comme par exemple "Ceasar IV" ou d'autre dans lequel la gestion est en temps réel et non par magie ou "Flux de donnée"

bref, j'ai testé le jeux par deux fois sur différente années, mais je m'ennuie trop dans ce jeu parce que il manque trop de réalisme au niveau de la gestion, mais ça peut être un bon jeu pour ceux qui n'aime pas trop ce cassé la tête,

mais pour ma part, je ne le recommande pas à ceux qui aime les jeux de gestion et de simulation, c'est vraiment la base de tout et vous risquer de vous ennuyé après quelque minutes, mais libre à vous de l'essyaé, mais il y à beaucoup d'autre jeux qui offre une prise de la gestion et de la simulation que celui-çi, donc faite vos recherche avant d'acheter...
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
1 personne(s) sur 1 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
10.2 heures en tout
Posté le : 19 octobre 2014
Hey, un city builder sympa, c'est toujours rare pour être souligné.
Sous des apparences qui pourraient rebuter (3D, gros batiments), le gameplay est en fait assez fin, et donc offre de nombreuses heures de jeu en perspective (mode histoire, mode bac à sable).
Le tuto permet de s'en sortir, après c'est en jouant qu'on comprend les méchanismes, après beaucoup d'erreurs :)
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
0 personne(s) sur 1 (0%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Recommandé
41.3 heures en tout
Posté le : 2 février 2015
J'aime ce jeu, c'est peut-être pas le meilleur, mais il est bien
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
0 personne(s) sur 1 (0%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
6.8 heures en tout
Posté le : 10 janvier
probleme avec windo/10
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
0 personne(s) sur 1 (0%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
Non recommandé
2.9 heures en tout
Posté le : 1 février
Jeu moyen.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante