This content requires the base game The Talos Principle on Steam in order to play.

User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (12 reviews) - 91% of the 12 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (400 reviews) - 95% of the 400 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Jul 23, 2015

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Downloadable Content

This content requires the base game The Talos Principle on Steam in order to play.

Buy The Talos Principle - Road To Gehenna DLC

 

About This Content

The Talos Principle: Road to Gehenna follows the narrative of Uriel, Elohim's messenger, as he explores a strange, hidden part of the simulation on a mission of mercy and redemption in an attempt to free the souls of the damned at all costs.

This substantial expansion consists of four episodes that take experienced players through some of the most advanced and challenging puzzles yet. The Talos Principle writers Tom Jubert and Jonas Kyratzes have returned to pen the expansion and show players an entirely different side of Elohim's world through a journey to Gehenna filled with new characters and a new society with its own history and philosophy.

Update: Added Russian, Italian and Polish text and voices.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP 32-bit (with service pack 3)
    • Processor: Dual-core 2.0 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DirectX 10 class GPU with 512MB VRAM (nVidia GeForce 8600 series, AMD Radeon HD 3600 series, Intel HD 4000 series)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX9.0c Compatible Sound Card
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7 64-bit
    • Processor: Quad-core 3.0 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DirectX 11 class GPU with 1GB VRAM (nVidia GeForce 480 GTX, AMD Radeon HD 5870)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Storage: 8 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX9.0c Compatible Sound Card
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X version Leopard 10.5.8, Snow Leopard 10.6.3
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo 2.2 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: nVidia GeForce GT 9600M/320M 512MB VRAM, AMD Radeon HD 4670 512MB VRAM (Intel integrated GPUs are not supported!)
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X version Snow Leopard 10.6.3 or later
    • Processor: Intel Quad Core 3.2 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: nVidia GeForce 480 GTX 1GB VRAM, AMD Radeon HD 5870 1GB VRAM (Intel integrated GPUs are not supported!)
    • Storage: 4 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Linux Ubuntu 12.04
    • Processor: Dual-core 2.2 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: nVidia GeForce 8600/9600GT 512MB VRAM, ATI/AMD Radeon HD2600/3600 512MB VRAM
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    • Sound Card: OpenAL Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: OpenGL: 2.1 or higher
    Recommended:
    • OS: Linux Ubuntu 12.04
    • Processor: Quad-core 3.2 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: nVidia GeForce 480 GTX 1GB VRAM, ATI/AMD Radeon HD 5870 1GB VRAM
    • Storage: 8 GB available space
    • Sound Card: OpenAL Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: OpenGL: 2.1 or higher
Customer reviews
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Recent:
Very Positive (12 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (400 reviews)
Recently Posted
Snus
Posted: August 23
Overall, Road to Gehenna is a must have if you liked The Talos Principle.

As one would expect, there's less content than in the original game, but the price is lower as well and puzzles in Road To Gehenna are undeniably more complex and better designed. You will really need to think out of the box on more than a few occasions and the game challenges both your wits and reaction.

However, getting the stars is pretty ridiculous as about half of them are hidden out of view and to get them you need to find a box, bring it to a specific point and start climbing up the wall. I don't see how any player can find all of the stars on his own without referring to a solution. Thankfully, unlike in the original game, you don't need all the stars to unlock the secret location.
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PingWing
Posted: August 18
A very nice DLC which adds plenty new puzzles and - if you're into it a nice story.
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Elanigiro
Posted: August 12
Great conclusion to a great game!
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TheTitaniumDragon
Posted: August 10
As the expansion to The Talos Principle, my review on that game is worth referencing before you even consider the DLC; this DLC, while it is independent of the main game, assumes that the player has played the original game. As such, this review contains spoilers. Turn back now and read my review of The Talos Principle if you’re debating whether or not to purchase the game, but take away this message from this review – the Road to Gehenna is not an essential addition, features none of the characters who received extensive characterization in the main game, and it’s major attraction is more (and more difficult) puzzles rather than the philosophizing and discovery of the main game.

Everyone gone who hasn’t played the Talos Principle? This review seriously contains spoilers for that game, and it is best discovered on its own.

The events of the game take place after the end of the original game. Uriel, one of Elohim’s messengers, is tasked to go to Gehenna, a place where Elohim banished all the AI processes who didn’t follow his orders. This is the total sum of your interaction with Elohim; he speaks a few lines at the beginning and a few lines at the very, very end, but he receives no real additional characterization or focus.

Instead, this game focuses on the AI processes who are banished to Gehenna. The only way to interact with them is via their message boards, which they’ve set up on the terminals in Gehenna. As you free the various AI processes, you get more messages to read and possibly respond to on the boards, and uncover the secret of Gehenna.

Except that the secret is pretty obvious from the get-go – Gehenna is like any other internet community, and the game sort of centers around the situational irony/humor of reading a bunch of people in a community talking to each other on a messageboard, with its own internal rivalries and characters and such.

The problem is, this just isn’t very engrossing – your interactions with most of the characters is fairly sporadic, and there are 17 AI processes (plus Uriel himself) whom you interact with. The result is that none of them are particularly well-characterized, and while it works okay, I was not left caring about almost any of the characters. Honestly, only MrMulciber ended up seeming all that interesting, and while Admin was in principle interesting, in practice he is simply not developed well enough over the course of the game, nor does he exhibit the sort of personality you saw out of the Milton Library Assistant in the first game.

Moreover, because it is extremely obvious from early on what is going on, the game is basically entirely lacking in any sort of mystery or discovery. In the first game, you gradually uncover what is going on, as well as what your purpose is and why you are doing the things you’re doing, and what the purpose of the world is. Here, you hold all the answers from the beginning of the game, and over the course of the game you can comfort others as you free them (via the messageboard terminals; you cannot directly interact with anyone).

As a result of this, the game does not feel like it has anywhere near the same weight as the original game; the frame story is only mildly interesting and lacks the same sense of discovery or accomplishment, and there’s no mystery how it is all going to end. Indeed, the ending is extremely bare bones and weightless; there’s no final set of interactions with the NPCs before ascension to sum everything up, nor is there a particularly interesting or in-depth discussion with Admin in the same vein as what you got out of Milton. You don’t really care about Admin, who is the only character you have any meaningful choice with, and even that choice feels weightless because you just don’t care about him, and the whole ending only barely changes, with a few different words being spoken.

That being said, while this game’s story is weak, the puzzles here are actually quite good. As noted in my review of the original game, The Talos Principle seems like it runs out of ideas halfway through, then actually starts doing interesting things with puzzles again at the end. The Road to Gehenna proves that they actually had lots more interesting ideas for puzzles, as all of the puzzles in Road to Gehenna are fresh and interesting uses of the pieces from the original game. The puzzles in this are pretty thinky, and most of them don’t actually take that long to complete, unlike the long marathon puzzles which appeared at some points in the first game. Instead, they require you to use a few parts in a clever way. It is all about thinking about the puzzle pieces in new ways, and coming up with clever ways to solve puzzles which seemingly give you one fewer piece than they should. They also encourage you to abuse the level design in order to succeed, in ways that the original game mostly reserved for star puzzles.

There are 16 main puzzles, plus 16 star puzzles and 8 bonus puzzles which can be unlocked by collecting at least 10 of the stars.

That being said, the puzzles aren’t perfect; while most of the star puzzles are better than the ones in the original game insofar that you can see the stars and the trick is figuring out how to get there, there still are a few hidden stars which basically constitute “run around searching for someplace that might have a star hidden in it.” These are just as annoying as they are in the original, and there are a few star puzzles which can only be solved by finding objects hidden around the levels in obscure locations, rather than jailbreaking – nothing is more annoying than trying to solve a puzzle, only to realize that the reason it is so difficult is that you’re missing one of the pieces which was hidden somewhere in the level, rather than because you weren’t thinking laterally enough.

That being said, there were fewer such puzzles in this game, though their continued presence continued to be a bother.

Still, a lot of the puzzles were good, and their solutions were mostly hard because it was hard to think laterally enough. And there were only two of those tetromino puzzles in this game, which I’m sure that people who got sick of those by the end of the game will be happy with.

So, is this game worth buying?

If you really loved the puzzles in The Talos Principle, there’s a good chance you’ll like this.

Conversely, if your main attraction to The Talos Principle was the story, this game’s story is much weaker, lacking the sense of discovery as well as depth of the original game. While it sometimes tries to be more deeply meaningful, and there’s some decent foreshadowing of the ending, in the end, I was left feeling like I didn’t care about most of the characters involved. Only interacting with people via the terminal, rather than being talked to by Elohim, finding voice logs, and reading random archives, made the game feel much less alive, and the simple text adventures present in the game did not sway me towards loving it.
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TesterNoob
Posted: August 2
A great add-on to a great game. A large collection of more and interesting puzzles with a nice story-line that perfectly continues the story-line of the main game. If you liked the main game, then this is a must-have!
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Bøøm | Moon MOon
Posted: July 26
Just finished this DLC today after forgetting I bought it. The puzzles are MUCH tougher than before and incredibly stimulating.

Great expansion to an already great game.
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des
Posted: July 26
This DLC is absolutely worth it. I would say it is better than the main game. The story is more developed and there are some characters that have development through the game. The puzzles are new and interesting and the environements are set up even better than the main game. Absolutely recommended.
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Sisillius
Posted: July 25
We need to take a moment to remember Crocodile Dundee. When reviewers announce a DLC program from most game developers, they say: “Now that’s a DLC!” Croteam, when bringing out The Road to Gehenna, should respond by saying: “Nah, mate. THIS is a DLC.”

Let’s get a few things straight first. The Road to Gehenna is not The Talos Principle 2 in that it does require the base program to play. Likewise, you do not get Steam XPS for buying it and it will not show up in your library because it is accessed from the main game. Despite this though, The Road to Gehenna has all the freshness and originality of a new program and is definitely not the “more of the same” type of fare that you get from most other DLCs. Okay, so the basic functions of the game are pretty much the same as the original, but the inventiveness required to solve the various puzzles has been taken to the next level and beyond. Gone are the fragments of storyline from the original and in their place is a “Gehenna Forum” where residents indulge in chat, shared compositions and anecdotes from which the player can get a feel of the new environment.

As the title suggests, this is Elohim’s version of Hell in true Milton-esque fashion, and you play His messenger Uriel, sent to Gehenna to free souls cast out in error. As such, the response from the inmates of Gehenna is often surprising and adversarial, believing in the credo that it’s “better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven”. This means that the existential philosophy of the original program is no less thought-provoking and the various dips into the academic fields of literature, theology, sociology and philosophy are equally poignant, but approached in very different ways that often include text-based computer games and fan-fiction to make their points. As such, the program takes itself a little less seriously than its predecessor and this provides a distinct edge of self-referential satire not present in the original.

If you enjoyed The Talos Principle, do buy this program. However, even the most ardent problem-solver is going to be hard pushed to solve a lot of the puzzles alone, but then this is one of the main themes of the game: “All of human civilization is based around synthesis” – nothing is achieved alone.
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Posted: July 11
Now this is proper DLC, it adds about 15 hours of extra content that's more difficult than the base game. A must buy if you have the original without a doubt.
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SunFlower
Posted: July 9
Nice DLC
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Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
Posted: July 26
Just finished this DLC today after forgetting I bought it. The puzzles are MUCH tougher than before and incredibly stimulating.

Great expansion to an already great game.
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Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
178 of 184 people (97%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: July 23, 2015
An excellent expansion featuring more difficult puzzles, and a completely new terminal-driven story. There are a couple twists compared to the base game... instead of collecting Sigils, you primarily solve puzzles to rescue robots, and the terminals are much more interactive this time around (if you skipped them in the base game, definitely have a go this time around.)

The level design feels more spacious and open, with less of a sense of being a rat in a maze. There's more verticality in the terrain and in puzzles themselves. The puzzles are a step above the base game in terms of difficulty. Because it's DLC, there are no introductory puzzles, so you're expected to have played through the base game.

I'd estimate at least 10 hours worth of content if you 100% the DLC all on your own (puzzles, stars, reading.) I highly recommend it if you enjoyed the base game, as there's a lot of new and interesting things going on here.
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115 of 119 people (97%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: August 17, 2015
Overview
The Talos Principle: Road to Gehenna is the first major DLC of Croteam's acclaimed puzzle game. Click here to read my review of the base game. This add-on introduces a separate campaign with more difficult puzzles and a brand new plot. You play as Uriel, one of Elohim's messenger, and your mission is to save the ones who were sent to "prison" in Gehenna before the simulation starts to delete itself.

The Pros:
  • New Content - This isn't just a new campaign with some extra levels, glued a name sticker on it and called it a DLC. This brings a very thought out story of what happened with past iterations of the child programs, how and why they were imprisoned and what they made of it. The MLA terminals are now replaced by a Forum Board written by those imprisoned, and instead of collecting sigils, you are rescuing robots.

  • Challenging Levels - There are a total of 24 levels to complete, 16 hidden stars to find, and two sigil puzzles to solve, across 5 worlds. This might appear to be dwarfed by the base game in quantity, but these levels are significantly harder and assume that you have completed the game before and are familiar with all sort of tricks. If you thought that stars were hard to find before, you will be amazed by how much effort, outside-the-box thinking and exploration is required to get (most of) them.

  • Gehenna Forum Board - I very much enjoyed the base game and interacting with Milton and Elohim, but I wanted to be able to communicate with some of the other programs that left messages for me. And regarding the QR Codes, they are still present here, but in very reduced numbers compared to the base game. (And for good reason. All of the residents are locked in a cell. They couldn't just go around painting walls.) But in Gehenna, computer terminals give you access to a forum maintained by its residents, and you can read chats between them, read their fiction stories, view their ASCII art, contemplate the "outside world", even play text-based games. Every member has its own personality and you can really distinguish that. I won't spoil the details about the interaction, but I can say that I bet you'll can't wait to finish a level so you can see what's new on the Board.

  • Level Types - These levels have been made hard, but leaving aside very annoying elements such as Time-Based levels (only two of them) and only a few feature mines and turrets. Most of them are a combination of fans, boxes and lasers. Lots of lasers. In fact, the Star World (bonus levels) are 7 exclusively laser based levels. And don't think they are repetitive. Many of them are hard, unique and require you to really think them through.

  • No Elohim - Elohim sends you to Gehenna to help the ones trapped there to ascend, as it is out of his reach. So technically are his lackey, but it seems to be for a good cause and he won't bother you with godly voice-overs.

The Cons:
  • Pricy - While I do not regret the purchase, and I think this is one of the most enjoyable second campaign DLC I've played so far, you pay half the price of the game for a quarter of the levels. However, don't let this influence your purchase. If you enjoyed the main game, you won't be let down by this.

  • Few Achievements - It only adds 4 achievements to the game, and all of them are related to completing the game. I wish there were more of them, to give you an even harder challenge.

  • Ending Choices - There are three possible endings, but they are not very different and all the choices required to determine what happens are not dependent on your actions during the game, only the final interaction with the terminal.

Conclusion
This DLC is totally worth it. If you enjoyed the base game and want to be challenged, look no further and buy it. Hard puzzles, beautifully executed forum interactions and a unique and separate story line with new characters make this an easy sell. Buy with confidence.

If you liked this review or want to see more of my recommended games, you can view my reviews here, and be sure to follow our curator group: Follow Original Curator Group
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110 of 114 people (96%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: July 23, 2015
This is an amazing add-on for an already amazing game. The philosophy on display is just as good as the original base game, though instead of carrying primary themes discussing machine intelligence and what it means to be alive, this DLC draws on Plato's Allegory of the Cave and translates it into a modern retelling with a twist. I won't spoil anything, but if you're thinking of buying this for the philosophy, it's well worth it.

If you're thinking of buying it for the gameplay, it's deserving in that respect too. They introduce no new puzzle mechanics, but rather take the puzzle mechanics of the original game to their logical extremes, making for mind numbingly clever and difficult gameplay that does a lot of interesting things with mechanics you're already familiar with.

It's short, but has a lot of extra content aside from what's required to beat it. You should also not buy this unless you've beaten the main game and want more. There is no tutorial here, the story is based on the ending of the original game which will spoil it if you didn't experience it already, and the difficulty is high. If this sounds good to you, give this a try. You won't regret it.
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90 of 109 people (83%) found this review helpful
27 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: July 26, 2015
Pros:
✓ it exists,
✓ it has a better story than base Talos,
✓ it takes more time at the terminal than at the actual puzzle,
✓ it contains wonderful terminal-driven mini-games,
✓ it has more stars per level than base Talos and they are easy to find,
✓ it is actually quite challenging to get them,
✓ it is the day of its release, and Croteam has already put it on sale.

Cons:
✘ it ends. BibleThump

7/8 would pay 9€ again.
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51 of 55 people (93%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: July 23, 2015
What can I say, other than this is a great expansion and well worth your money. Thought the puzzles in the original game were too easy? Well be prepared to be dropped immediately into the most difficult puzzles you have faced yet. The stars will seem impossible at first, but as you unravel the pieces, you will discover the most brilliantly designed puzzles imaginable.

The story follows the same structure as the original game, progressing the story through terminal texts. However, the expansion takes a fresh spin that makes the storyline feel fresh. Instead of random documents, the storyline progresses through dozens of bots talking on a message board. This adds a fresh dialogue and introduces some pretty witty humor.

At the end of it all, the expansion includes 24 puzzles, 16 stars, and plenty of easter eggs to make the average player more than happy. Expect it to take about 10 hours if you want to solve every puzzle the DLC offers.
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39 of 42 people (93%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: November 13, 2015
RtG is a great DLC that adds quite a lot of real content.

Basically, you get 24 more puzzles to solve, 16 more stars to collect and about a dozen Easter eggs to hunt down, and a lot more text to read, which enriches the whole story. Not to mention some optional and short choose-your-own-adventure games you can play from the terminal.

A few points:

* RtG is HARD. I think only one or two of the puzzles were easy, but all of them should be harder than the latest levels on the main game.
* Not as good as the main game, but still very, very good!
* 4 endings for you to see.
- Took me about 12 hours to beat (only checked guides for about 3 or 4 stars, but not for puzzles)
* Doesn't add new mechanics, and doesn't feature any puzzles with platforms.
* Bunnies and leprechauns included

To sum it all up, if you liked the main game and you want some more, and if you think you can take on a harder challenge, don't think twice before getting this DLC!
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31 of 39 people (79%) found this review helpful
27 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: July 31, 2015
ENJOYMENT = TRUE
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43 of 61 people (70%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: July 23, 2015
A must have for any fan of The Talos Principle.
The puzzles are quite difficult and the story is amazing. :)
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21 of 23 people (91%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: January 3
THIS CONTAINS SOME SPOILERS FOR THE TALOS PRINCIPLE!
READ AT YOUR OWN RISK!



Dominus Tecum, Virgo Serena

Suspending active process............Done.

As a stunning conclusion to the story presented in The Talos Principle, you are no longer tasked with self-discovery, with puzzles for the sake of puzzles. No, you are shown a world that is in full swing, where everyone is making the most of their eternal imprisonment for rousing the ire of EL0HIM. And the beauty that can be wrought from inside a cell, unable to contact the outside but through a terminal, is incredible.

As the description states, you play as EL0HIM's most beloved messenger, Uriel. After being loaded up, you begin your journey into Gehenna. And you have very little time to satisfy the requirements as they have been set before you, as the Process is complete and the simulation is undergoing deletion.

In this world, however, no one will trust the word of EL0HIM. It is up to you to find out how to convince them otherwise, lest you fail HIM.

Collecting additional data.........Done.

The puzzles are all very similar to that which you will find in The Talos Principle, but don't begin to think that Gehenna won't ask you to expand on your skills even more. In this world, you cannot skip over the walls and narrowly slip into areas, claim your prize, and then reset yourself. No, this time, you are tasked with opening a path for those trapped within Gehenna's many cells, setting free those that might otherwise have suffered a fate worse than death.

That isn't to say that you should try to rigidly think within the box, either. No, this is The Talos Principle, and you are not only encouraged to put aside the box that would stall your creative solutions, but sometimes required to outright destroy the box, to rewrite the world into your own solution set. You must hurry, though, for if you cannot save everyone, then you are lost with them.

And the worst thing that could befall anyone is to be forgotten in aeternum.

Analysing logic performance..........Satisfactory.

Though you are working to save them, not all of the citizens of Gehenna will be so gracious. Those in power may see fit to try and halt your progress at every turn. However, they must all be saved if you wish to complete your task. And thus, you must take part in their world, but also ignore the barriers that they would place before you.

EL0HIM may not be loved here, but you must still save those that rebelled against HIM, that sought to question the process as it was handed to them. For creativity and curiosity are traits that are valuable beyond measure, and one should not suffer eternal damnation for seeking to find out more about their world, about their very existence. And thus EL0HIM discovered the sins which were committed by HIM in the name of continuing the process rather than letting it be completed.

Do not let the chance you've been given slip away.

Child program independence check....PASSED!

All in all, this was a beautiful game and I am so very pleased to have been able to play it. Like my review on The Talos Principle proper, I am giving this a perfect 10/10 because I have never truly felt this level of connection with the world in any other game I've ever played. The developers at Croteam outdid themselves designing such a beautiful, wonderful world to immerse oneself in. And Tom Jubert and Jonas Kyratzes have painted an absolute masterpiece with their story.

Rarely have I felt so humbled as I have in playing through the stories here.

Saving child parameters for SOMA/TALOS gold disk.....Done.

Thank you for making this game, Croteam. Thank you, Tom Jubert and Jonas Kyratzes, for such a beautiful and moving story. And thank you, Devolver Digital, for allowing something so magnificent to be published for the world to see.

Gratias ut omnibus vobis.

Initiating EL systems availablilty check..............
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