You've never played a comic book like this! Control a team of heroes battling evil villains across dynamic environments. Play out epic comic book battles come to life in this exciting adaptation of the hit card game.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (14 reviews) - 85% of the 14 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (354 reviews) - 87% of the 354 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Dec 22, 2014

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Recent updates View all (52)

June 23

What's New in Version 1.9.1 - Bug Fixes!

Bugs. Glitches. General wackiness. That seems to be most of what those Handelabra characters put into the last update, besides me of course. I’m Guise, and I’m even better than before! They tell me that the worst problems have been fixed… we’ll see about that!

  • My lovable mug now shows up on my Weekly One-Shot, and at the end of the game. Brick walls are boring!
  • The Argent Adept and Mister Fixer no longer get to play with their presents before they are opened. Tsk tsk!
  • Fixed Point no longer allows multiple Limited cards to be in play after being flipped face up. Everyone likes presents, but come on!
  • If there’s nobody else around to high five, the game won’t get stuck anymore. However, you may experience a momentary feeling of loss.
  • Powers on equipment borrowed by Lemme See That can now be used out of turn properly. That was annoying!
  • Overcharging the Overcharged Systems would cause a terrible code explosion and make bad things happen. Not anymore, I think!
  • It was fun to watch Kismet’s Talisman get blown up over and over and over and over and over and over by the Volcanic Eruption… NOT.
  • Trust me there were more weird things, too many to write about here. All fixed! Yep!

1 comments Read more

June 8

What's New in Version 1.9 - It's me! Guise!

Hi there! Pay attention now. It's me: Guise. You know me. This is all you need to know about this update:

PROS: You can download me! I am awesome.
CONS: some weird blue alien guy and a dangerous robot factory, but don't worry about them.

I'm Guise. I'm the best.

Season Pass 1 owners will automatically receive Mini-Pack 3. Sweet!

http://store.steampowered.com/app/467510

The Handelabra guys and gals tell me there's more stuff in this update too. Whatever! You know what it's really about. Me!

  • You can now view your collection of Weekly One-Shot covers in grid format.
  • The New Game screen now also supports sorting decks by difficulty/complexity.
  • Multiplayer chat has an improved font (Comic Neue) that supports lower case, multiple languages, and special characters.
  • Fixed a few more bugs here and there.

6 comments Read more

Reviews

“This is a must have addition to your digital board game collection.”
BoardGameGeek

“The quality of the app is phenomenal, the production is beautiful, it’s just a lot of fun!”
Dukes of Dice

“Whether you’re a fan of tabletop gaming or not, this game has a lot to offer.”
GIZORAMA

About This Game

Calling all Sentinels! Do you have what it takes to defend the Multiverse? Compose a team of comic book heroes, each with their own playstyles, backstories, and grudges. Pit them against a variety of maniacal and formidable villains. Defeat your enemies and save the Multiverse!

Sentinels of the Multiverse is the award-winning game in which players join forces as heroes to combat a dastardly villain in a dynamic environment.

The digital version of Sentinels of the Multiverse plays like a comic book come to life! Control an entire team of heroes in single player, or head online and join heroes from around the globe in multiplayer. This is cooperative card-battle like you’ve never played before!

The rules of the game are deceptively simple: Play a Card, Use a Power, and Draw a Card. What makes Sentinels of the Multiverse unique is that each card has special abilities that can create powerful combos or even change the rules of the game!

This digital version includes all content from the Sentinels of the Multiverse core game:
  • 10 Heroes: Absolute Zero, Bunker, Fanatic, Haka, Legacy, Ra, Tachyon, Tempest, The Visionary, & The Wraith
  • 4 Villains: Baron Blade, Citizen Dawn, Grand Warlord Voss, & Omnitron
  • 4 Environments: Insula Primalis, Megalopolis, Ruins of Atlantis, & Wagner Mars Base

It also includes several unlockable variant cards:
  • Variant heroes with alternate powers and backstory
  • Variant villains bring an all new twist on the battle
  • All are unlockable via secret Sentinels storyline-based challenges!

Expansion packs that add new heroes, villains, and environments are available as downloadable content via Steam.
  • Season Pass 1 includes the first 4 expansions and 3 mini-packs. Save money and get all the content!
  • Mini-Pack 1 includes Unity, Ambuscade, and Silver Gulch, 1883.
  • Rook City includes Expatriette, Mr. Fixer, The Chairman, The Matriarch, Plague Rat, Spite, Pike Industrial Complex, and Rook City.
  • Infernal Relics includes The Argent Adept, NightMist, Akash'Bhuta, Apostate, The Ennead, GloomWeaver, Realm of Discord, and Tomb of Anubis.
  • Mini-Pack 2 includes The Scholar, Miss Information, and The Final Wasteland.
  • Shattered Timelines includes Chrono-Ranger, Omnitron-X, La Capitan, The Dreamer, Kismet, Iron Legacy, The Block, and Time Cataclysm.
  • Wrath of the Cosmos includes Captain Cosmic, Sky-Scraper, Deadline, Infinitor, Kaargra Warfang, Progeny, Dok’Thorath Capital, and The Enclave of the Endlings.
  • Mini-Pack 3 includes Guise, Wager Master, and Omnitron-IV.

Every rule & interaction in the game has been carefully adapted and thoroughly tested by expert Sentinels players, as well as the designer himself. If you’re wondering how a certain situation works in SotM, this game is the ultimate rules lawyer!

Features

  • Original music brings the Multiverse to life like you’ve never heard before. Rock out to the official Sentinels Theme Song, ambient tracks for each environment, and ending themes for each villain.
  • Beautifully rendered environment backdrops put you right in the action.
  • Brand new artwork for every Hero and Villain in the game, created by Sentinels of the Multiverse artist Adam Rebottaro himself.
  • Over 9,000 different potential battles to choose from by combining the 10 Heroes, 4 Villains, and 4 Environments.
  • Play a solo game with three to five heroes, or pass & play with your friends.
  • Cross-platform online multiplayer with friends and others from around the world.

Sentinels of The Multiverse: The Video Game is an officially licensed product of “Sentinels of the Multiverse®” from Greater Than Games LLC.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP SP2+
    • Processor: SSE2 instruction set support
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DX9 (shader model 2.0) capabilities, 1024x768 resolution
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Storage: 600 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OS X 10.8
    • Processor: SSE2 instruction set support
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DX9 (shader model 2.0) capabilities, 1024x768 resolution
    • Storage: 600 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04+, SteamOS+
    • Processor: SSE2 instruction set support
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DX9 (shader model 2.0) capabilities, 1024x768 resolution
    • Storage: 600 MB available space
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Very Positive (14 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (354 reviews)
Recently Posted
SilverAgeFan
( 6.6 hrs on record )
Posted: June 30
Pretty disappointed in this game. As a refugee from CoH, I've been looking for something that scratches that superhero itch for me.

The concept is great, but the learning curve is frustratingly steep. The interface is slow, clunky, and repetitive. The gameplay itself is very unforgiving.

I see some loyal fans posting positive reviews of the physical card game. Perhaps if I knew that version better, I'd feel differently about this. But the rules are strange and opaque. Guides are rather difficult to come across. And the tutorial isn't worth much.

Lastly, 26 of 40 achievements are hidden. After doing some research, it reads like all require purchasing the numerous DLC to complete. That to me is a sign that most the game is locked away behind DLC packages that feel overpriced.

I don't think I'd recommend this title to friends.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
hexenjagd
( 0.7 hrs on record )
Posted: June 30
It is a fun card game.
Easy mechanic, easy to understand.

However it is lack of "campaign" all of the gameplays are set by the player (you can randomize it though).
I think it will be really great if this game has a set of campaign, fighting boss villain with certain set of heroes (pre determined) and a little bit of story
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Littlemonky
( 5.1 hrs on record )
Posted: June 28
Fantastic game 10/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
space bees
( 9.1 hrs on record )
Posted: June 27
A faithful adaptation of the card game, except you don't have to have friends in the same place to play it. Or any friends at all. I'm not here to judge.

Pros:
- Much less expensive than the physical game (the physical Core Game alone is $40), even without the Steam sale.
- Online multiplayer is a thing.
- A buttload of possible hero/villain/environment combinations to keep things fresh (with the DLC- see below.)
- Keeps track of minutiae like which effects are active, damage calculations, etc. for you- a godsend if you're playing with one of the more complicated characters.
- Pretty nice interface- bold, colorful, and you can tweak the length of animations and how long cards are shown to your needs.

Cons:
- I bought the core game and Season Pass at the same time so I haven't seen it, but word from other reviewers is the game is pretty pushy about selling you the DLC. And you *need* at least some of it if you're going to play multiplayer or Weekly One-Shots. (Plus, all the really interesting villains are in expansions.)
- Not a lot of people in multiplayer, though the Steam sale may change that.
- Minor interface quibble: cards attached to characters (e.g. most of Captain Cosmic's constructs) kind of get lost in the shuffle.

edit: turns out there was a setting for some of the interface stuff that bugged me, right on
Helpful? Yes No Funny
MikeAkaJB
( 3.0 hrs on record )
Posted: June 26
I'll start off by saying I've only dabbled in the base game solo and am sort of familair with the physical game.

I think $2.99 (2016 Summer Steam Sale price) for the base game is a great value. I've definitely spent more on worse games. It allows a very low entry price point into this genre of game for people who might be on the fence about co-op card based games.

Granted the Season 1 Pass is not a huge discount at 10% off ($17.99) vs the regular $19.99. However, that plus the base game makes it sort of like a $21 game. How much lower do people expect the base + season 1 pass should have been? $18? $15? $10? To people who like this genre of game $21 is well worth it. The only other option would have been to package it all together at a higher price or include in the base game 1-2 more villians from the dlc without increasing the current price. I haven't decided if I'm going to purchase the Season 1 Pass yet or wait some more time because I'm sort of backlogged on games at the moment.

Season 2 Pass is expected to come out over the course of the next year or so for about $25. This should double the current base + season 1 content while offering an almost completely new and different experience in the form of team vs team. The game itself could be less in your face about trying to sell you dlcs. Other than that I think the game represents the physical card game fairly good.

One thing to know is for a single match you do need anywhere from 30 mins - 1.5 hours or more. This highly depends on how familiar people are with the various cards, how hard the villian / environment combo is, make up of your team, and how long people take to make decisions.

Some other comments have talked about the slow mechanism of the actual playing of the cards. However, this can be sped up tremendously under options or if you click the screen when the cards are being played. Playing with people familair to the game makes things a lot quicker.

The multiplayer community is lacking because the player base is very small. At any given time since buying the base game I've only seen about 30-100 people in current games, less than 10 looking for a game, or 1-3 publicly open games. Those public games you may or may not be able to play in depending on what dlcs you own. This is a glaring issue with segmenting the already small community up based on what dlc content you do or don't own and was mention by some other reviewers or on the discussion board.

It is as the developer has said common in other games with dlc map packs. The biggest difference is those other games have a huge player base. Even then there are many public games that end up running mostly the base map packs as not to alienate / segment the community. It would be a turn off if you are looking for multiplayer action but can't get into a game since you don't own a map from a dlc.

I really don't know the solution other than turning the game into a single product thereby forcing people into purchasing it all together or not at all. This type of business model I really don't know how well it would work or not. It might work if the demo had all content available but a time or number of matches played restriction. It might get people into paying the some odd $20-25 or so for everything. People might just be on the fence because they don't know about this genre of game. If they can see how much variety and replayability there is from all the different interactions between all the various characters, villians, and environments, then they might just fall in love with the game to spend $20-25 on the full game. Single player mode is basically non-existent when it comes to any type of story mode. The real value of this game comes down to multiplayer or pass and play with friends. Segmenting the small multiplayer community with dlc restrictions I think is counter productive.

I think a large % of the current player base are people who own the physical game, know they like this style of game, and have friends who enjoy this type of game. A co-op card base game is not for everyone. Example, right now steamcharts says there are 103 people playing, daily peak of 125, and an all time peak of 322. It does have cross platform multiplayer functionality which is nice if you have friends who play from a tablet.

I would currently recommend the base game to everyone just because of the price. However, I would only recommend the base + Season 1 Pass to those who love the game, already have a group of friends to do pass and play with since it is much cheaper than the physical game and easier to keep track of counters, or if you know people that already have everything to play with online, I wouldn't rely your purchasing decision on the ability to find random public games because it will be extremely hard to do so even with purchasing everything. My opinion would be much different if the online community base was bigger and you could easily find a public game to play in.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kuub
( 6.7 hrs on record )
Posted: June 25
Own physical copy, love the digital version.
Use the free lear-to-play to lure playgroup friends into the Multiverse :)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
mageofthesands
( 190.6 hrs on record )
Posted: June 24
I've never played a virtual board game as much as this. I started to hand this out to people like candy. One person went ahead and bought the physical game once, then again via the big money Kickstarter. It's that good.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
wyndhydra
( 18.4 hrs on record )
Posted: June 24
Exceptional game. It has been solidly brought to the digital realm with the requisite feel of comics. The game features great gameplay, an exceptional soundtrack and beautiful art. Well worth your time.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
DO DOPE FUCK HOPE
( 8.3 hrs on record )
Posted: June 24
TLDR: Don't buy this fun-ish f2p style DLC farm.

I got Sentinels from someone who bought the Humble monthly and didn't want it, so my barrier to entry was low. And that was fitting, because it's structured like a Free-To-Play game and if I had paid money for the base content I would have refunded it.

The Game:
The game itself is pretty fun, you have a few heros and villains and the card game unfolds nice little comic book battle scenes. It's based on a physical card game I guess, but having the computer to shuffle and deal and track the rules and counters and stuff makes it a lot more fun to just play the game without worrying about keeping track of a million tiny things. The graphics are not amazing and lots of the backgrounds and effects are really cheap looking, but it all keeps you up to date and little touches like the hero appearance changing as they take damage are nice touches.

The Bad:
When you boot up the game for the first time, you will be get a quick explanation of how to play. After the tutorial it will set you off to make your own game and then you will notice right away: you didn't buy the actual game. You bought a F2P basic nothing freebie pack. You have a hand full of heroes unlocked, but there are 3x as many taunting you with giant lock icons and tucked into a million tiny DLCs. Same with villains, same with locations. The promotional weekly encounters are mainly locked as well because you don't even get to play the weekly challenge and try heroes you don't own, you either own every single scrap of content for that match or you go without. Which brings us to

The Worse:
In the eyes of the developer, this is exactly how things ought to be. The "game" is an intro to a DLC sales area, plain and simple. They've already done crowd funding for a second round of expansion DLCs, because this business model is ment to keep the devs working pretty much forever. Which could be great: everyone loves to have their games get more support. But they have no interest in a positive player experience. Multiplayer only works if you both own all the same DLC. So if you want to play with me you either can't use any non-basic cards, or I can't play at all. This kind of splintering of multiplayer community has ruined the playability of many games in the past, too many to list.

The Ugly Bottom Line:
Right now (Steam Summer Sale 2016) the base game is priced for only a couple bucks, while the season pack DLC collection is more than 6x the price. That's not a mistake, it's the business model. When I tried to confirm this on the user forums, the dev literally threatened to report my account to Steam (!?!) Even if you really like the sound of this game and really want to play it, don't spend a cent on this product, at least not until you can get a meaningful amount of content included for your money.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
169.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 10
Silver age goodness. First super hero game I've played that makes you feel like a hero.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
190.6 hrs on record
Posted: June 24
I've never played a virtual board game as much as this. I started to hand this out to people like candy. One person went ahead and bought the physical game once, then again via the big money Kickstarter. It's that good.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 26
I'll start off by saying I've only dabbled in the base game solo and am sort of familair with the physical game.

I think $2.99 (2016 Summer Steam Sale price) for the base game is a great value. I've definitely spent more on worse games. It allows a very low entry price point into this genre of game for people who might be on the fence about co-op card based games.

Granted the Season 1 Pass is not a huge discount at 10% off ($17.99) vs the regular $19.99. However, that plus the base game makes it sort of like a $21 game. How much lower do people expect the base + season 1 pass should have been? $18? $15? $10? To people who like this genre of game $21 is well worth it. The only other option would have been to package it all together at a higher price or include in the base game 1-2 more villians from the dlc without increasing the current price. I haven't decided if I'm going to purchase the Season 1 Pass yet or wait some more time because I'm sort of backlogged on games at the moment.

Season 2 Pass is expected to come out over the course of the next year or so for about $25. This should double the current base + season 1 content while offering an almost completely new and different experience in the form of team vs team. The game itself could be less in your face about trying to sell you dlcs. Other than that I think the game represents the physical card game fairly good.

One thing to know is for a single match you do need anywhere from 30 mins - 1.5 hours or more. This highly depends on how familiar people are with the various cards, how hard the villian / environment combo is, make up of your team, and how long people take to make decisions.

Some other comments have talked about the slow mechanism of the actual playing of the cards. However, this can be sped up tremendously under options or if you click the screen when the cards are being played. Playing with people familair to the game makes things a lot quicker.

The multiplayer community is lacking because the player base is very small. At any given time since buying the base game I've only seen about 30-100 people in current games, less than 10 looking for a game, or 1-3 publicly open games. Those public games you may or may not be able to play in depending on what dlcs you own. This is a glaring issue with segmenting the already small community up based on what dlc content you do or don't own and was mention by some other reviewers or on the discussion board.

It is as the developer has said common in other games with dlc map packs. The biggest difference is those other games have a huge player base. Even then there are many public games that end up running mostly the base map packs as not to alienate / segment the community. It would be a turn off if you are looking for multiplayer action but can't get into a game since you don't own a map from a dlc.

I really don't know the solution other than turning the game into a single product thereby forcing people into purchasing it all together or not at all. This type of business model I really don't know how well it would work or not. It might work if the demo had all content available but a time or number of matches played restriction. It might get people into paying the some odd $20-25 or so for everything. People might just be on the fence because they don't know about this genre of game. If they can see how much variety and replayability there is from all the different interactions between all the various characters, villians, and environments, then they might just fall in love with the game to spend $20-25 on the full game. Single player mode is basically non-existent when it comes to any type of story mode. The real value of this game comes down to multiplayer or pass and play with friends. Segmenting the small multiplayer community with dlc restrictions I think is counter productive.

I think a large % of the current player base are people who own the physical game, know they like this style of game, and have friends who enjoy this type of game. A co-op card base game is not for everyone. Example, right now steamcharts says there are 103 people playing, daily peak of 125, and an all time peak of 322. It does have cross platform multiplayer functionality which is nice if you have friends who play from a tablet.

I would currently recommend the base game to everyone just because of the price. However, I would only recommend the base + Season 1 Pass to those who love the game, already have a group of friends to do pass and play with since it is much cheaper than the physical game and easier to keep track of counters, or if you know people that already have everything to play with online, I wouldn't rely your purchasing decision on the ability to find random public games because it will be extremely hard to do so even with purchasing everything. My opinion would be much different if the online community base was bigger and you could easily find a public game to play in.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
6.6 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
Pretty disappointed in this game. As a refugee from CoH, I've been looking for something that scratches that superhero itch for me.

The concept is great, but the learning curve is frustratingly steep. The interface is slow, clunky, and repetitive. The gameplay itself is very unforgiving.

I see some loyal fans posting positive reviews of the physical card game. Perhaps if I knew that version better, I'd feel differently about this. But the rules are strange and opaque. Guides are rather difficult to come across. And the tutorial isn't worth much.

Lastly, 26 of 40 achievements are hidden. After doing some research, it reads like all require purchasing the numerous DLC to complete. That to me is a sign that most the game is locked away behind DLC packages that feel overpriced.

I don't think I'd recommend this title to friends.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
9.1 hrs on record
Posted: June 27
A faithful adaptation of the card game, except you don't have to have friends in the same place to play it. Or any friends at all. I'm not here to judge.

Pros:
- Much less expensive than the physical game (the physical Core Game alone is $40), even without the Steam sale.
- Online multiplayer is a thing.
- A buttload of possible hero/villain/environment combinations to keep things fresh (with the DLC- see below.)
- Keeps track of minutiae like which effects are active, damage calculations, etc. for you- a godsend if you're playing with one of the more complicated characters.
- Pretty nice interface- bold, colorful, and you can tweak the length of animations and how long cards are shown to your needs.

Cons:
- I bought the core game and Season Pass at the same time so I haven't seen it, but word from other reviewers is the game is pretty pushy about selling you the DLC. And you *need* at least some of it if you're going to play multiplayer or Weekly One-Shots. (Plus, all the really interesting villains are in expansions.)
- Not a lot of people in multiplayer, though the Steam sale may change that.
- Minor interface quibble: cards attached to characters (e.g. most of Captain Cosmic's constructs) kind of get lost in the shuffle.

edit: turns out there was a setting for some of the interface stuff that bugged me, right on
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.1 hrs on record
Posted: June 28
Fantastic game 10/10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
31.8 hrs on record
Posted: June 5
Fun and addictive, the multi-player needs a bit of work yet, but otherwise very true to the paper game (and showed me some mistakes I was making when playing that) and just a blast to play.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
106 of 122 people (87%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Recommended
30.2 hrs on record
Posted: February 15, 2015
Needs multiplayer now. Otherwise that 5-pack option is a rude trap.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
38 of 42 people (90%) found this review helpful
Recommended
16.2 hrs on record
Posted: December 22, 2014
Digital version of an incredibly addicting tabletop game with tons of replay value. The UI is smooth and easy to use, and all the cards are very readable at different resolutions. The ability to active/use cards without having to double-click each one is very handy once you get used to the game and learn the cards by heart - which will happen if you use a hero long enough. The music is great as well, which was a pleasant surprise, and fits the superhero theme wonderfully. The inclusion of unlockable variant promo cards is a great addition, because each varant changes up the base power of the hero, or in the villain's case can really change the way the villain plays. This adds even more variety and combinations to a game already full of hundreds of hero/villain/environment combinations. And with the expansions inevitably on their way, there'll be even more. The tutorial is also really well done so you don't have to worry about being familiar with the tabletop rules before hand. It really walked through everything you could possibly need to know about how the game works, which is nice for those who've never played before.

On the flipside, the only thing I don't really like about this digital version is the lack of online multiplayer, although it is coming in a future update. The game does, however, lend itself really well to playing multiplayer locally by simply sharing the computer. And of course being able to play the game solo when you're craving a Sentinels fix is really where this game shines. Controller support would also be nice for playing on a TV, but that is also coming down the pipe eventually. Handleabra games is really doing a nice job of making the transition from physical boardgame to digital version.

As for the gameplay itself, it plays exactly like the tabletop version. Each player takes control of a superhero and teams up to take down a villain. Each hero has it's own unique deck of cards with wildly varying playstyles between each hero. Legacy, for example, is the paragon of justice who uses his cards and abilities to buff and defend his team of heroes, while someone like Tachyon uses her super-speed to burn through her deck drawing and discarding cards, many of which do more damage based on how many specific cards are in her discard pile. Each hero's deck of cards fits the hero's theme and superpower wonderfully, making for a different experience and strategy with each hero.

However, the villains also have a deck of cards full of minions and nasty super-powered attacks to take down the heroes. At some point during the game the villain's card will trigger an effect that causes it to flip over, which changes up the mechanics of how the villain plays - and sometimes changes the max HP the villain has. Plus each villain has a nemesis (or multiple ones) attached to it, which means the villain does extra damage to his nemesis, and vice-versa. And you can't forget about the environment you're playing on. After the villain has had his turn and all the heroes have gone, the environment itself gets a turn and draws a card from it's deck. Sometimes the environment deck helps the heroes out in someway, most of the time it does horrible, horrible things to the players like having pterodactyls steal all of your equipment. Each enviroment has it's own gimmicks to it's deck. Megalopolis has lots of city hazards like a speeding train that can damage both heroes and villains, or cops that show up to aid the heroes. Meanwhile something like Wagner Mars Base has a self-destruct timer, which if it reaches the end kills both the heroes and the villain and everyone on the Mars base ending in a draw.

The game has hundreds of combinations, as each time you play you pick a villain, and environment, and anywhere between 3-5 heroes. Everytime you play even just changing one of those from the previous game can really affect the outcome of the game and change the strategy you'll be using. The game has so much variety, and the rules are so simple to pick it up, that it makes itself very addicting. You can play dozens of times and still be surprised when something crazy happens that flips the current game on it's head. I really can't recommend this enough.
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