We Happy Few

Psychedelic survival adventure We Happy Few has been rejected for certification by the Australian Classification Board, preventing its release and effectively banning it from sale in the country. Developer Compulsion Games has now addressed the board's decision in a new blog post.

We Happy Few's events unfurl in the shadow of a dystopian society, which, as in the seminal 60s TV series The Prisoner, hides behind the quaint facade of a picturesque English village. Wellington Wells' always-smiling citizens, eager to forget a horrifying shared experience, spend their days high on a hallucinogenic drug called Joy - leading into We Happy Few's core themes of addiction, mental health, and drug abuse.

According to the Australian Classification Board's website, games that are Refused Classification commonly "depict, express or otherwise deal with matters of sex, drug misuse or addiction, crime, cruelty, violence or revolting or abhorrent phenomena in such a way that they offend against the standards of morality, decency and propriety generally accepted by reasonable adults to the extent that they should not be classified."

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Eurogamer

Jagex has announced that, after 17 years of operation, RuneScape Classic - the original version of its long-running fantasy MMO - will no longer be available to play on its servers from August 6th, 2018.

RuneScape Classic is, essentially, a snapshot of RuneScape as it originally released in 2001. That initial version has seen two major revisions in the years since, as well as (slightly confusingly) the arrival of Old School RuneScape - a version of the game more or less as it was in 2007.

As RuneScape has grown and evolved though, RuneScape Classic has continued to live on in a dusty corner of Jagex's servers. It's no longer updated or officially supported by the developer, but access is still permitted to certain players.

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Eurogamer

Battlefield V, in case you hadn't guessed already, is a very real video game that sees DICE return to World War 2 for the latest instalment of its large scale multiplayer-focused shooter. Ahead of tonight's reveal, press were invited to a two-hour rundown of everything that's new in Battlefield V - a detail-rich dive into all that sets this year's edition out from what's gone before. And a little on what it's taking from the likes of PUBG and Fortnite as the world's most popular games leave their mark on the old guard of shooters. Here's all that we learnt from the reveal.

The history of Battlefield goes all the way back to 2002 - and a game that used World War 2 as the setting for its own spectacular 64-player sandbox. DICE has returned to the era before with the brilliant Battlefield 1943 - a stripped down revisiting of the game realised on the Frostbite engine that hit PlayStation Network and Xbox Live Arcade back in 2009 - but this marks the first time the studio has properly gone back with a fully-fledged title. "All of us have yearned for years to go back to this era," Lars Gustavsson, creative director at DICE and the producer of the original Battlefield 1942 said at the event. "We wanted to go back to where Battlefield started. This is back to where it all began, with new possibilities."

Battlefield V's aim is to present an unexpected take on World War 2, though - to go towards the "unseen, untold, unplayed" scenarios, in DICE's own words, as the studio looks to go beyond the beach landings that have become familiar in countless other takes on the same material. To that end it'll go to the arctic circle in Norway in one of its War Stories - the single-player component that returns from Battlefield 1 - and, DICE said, to the French countryside, the devastation of Rotterdam and the North African desert throughout its adventures, some of which do seem a little over-familiar already, admittedly, but perhaps DICE has got its own spin prepared for our return to these arenas.

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Eurogamer

UPDATE: While I was writing all that below, Rare sneakily released full details on next week's The Hungering Deep content expansion, due on May 29th - so much of the speculation down there is now confirmed.

According to Rare, its "medium-sized" Hungering Deep update (compared to those due later this year) consists of two distinct parts: there's the quest-like limited-time campaign event, and a bunch of new items and features which will remain in the game permanently.

The permanent stuff comes in the form of the new drum instrument, the new Speaking Trumpet (enabling crews to be heard at a distance and to "find other crews on the same voyage"), plus customisable flags for the top of your ship, so that you might signal your intentions from afar. Additionally, there are new personal customisation options in the form of tattoos and scars, plus, of course, the new (probably megalodon-like) AI threat.

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Eurogamer

EA is nearly ready to reveal Battlefield V, the next big game in DICE's blockbuster first-person shooter series.

The publisher hosts a live reveal of the game tonight at 9pm UK time, with The Daily Show host Trevor Noah and DICE showing off the World War 2-themed FPS.

You can watch the action in the video below.

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PLAYERUNKNOWN'S BATTLEGROUNDS

Have you noticed the way the sound works in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds has changed? If the answer to that question is yes, you're not alone.

It turns out, the developers of the game did change the way PUBG's sound works - but forgot to tell anyone.

"Some of you have noticed that we made some changes to the way sound works in PUBG's most recent patch," reads an update on PUBG's Steam page.

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Eurogamer

Overwatch professional players train hard - that's how they get to the top of their game. But at what point does training become brutal and potentially unhealthy?

China's Overwatch League team, the Shanghai Dragons have lost all 32 of their matches in the Overwatch League, prompting difficult questions about their training.

In response, the team's manager, Yang Van, published a Twitlonger post to address this concern - and in the process revealed a brutal training regime that has some worrying for the health of the players.

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Eurogamer

A few years ago, as Facebook forked out $2bn for Oculus and Valve and Sony entered the fray with fancy tech of their own, virtual reality looked like it might have become the next big thing not just in video game land, but in entertainment.

Fast forward to 2018, and things haven't grown quite as fast as some of the major players had hoped.

One of those major players is Sony, which released the PlayStation VR headset in October 2016. As of December 2017, PSVR had sold two million units.

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Leisure Suit Larry 1 - In the Land of the Lounge Lizards

There's a new Leisure Suit Larry game for some reason.

Leisure Suit Larry: Wet Dreams Don't Dry comes out autumn 2018 on PC and Mac. Like the Leisure Suit Larry games of old, this one's a point and click adventure "with questionable pickup lines".

The note to press includes the following eye-rolling line: "Larry moves straight from the 80s into the 21st century. In times of #metoo and online dating via smartphone, Larry has to find his way around."

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Eurogamer

When Konami announced it had lost the Champions League licence for PES 2019, it moved to reassure fans that it had more officially-licensed leagues to compensate. Now, it's announced the game will have nine new fully-licensed leagues, one of which is the Scottish top flight.

Today Konami announced seven of the nine new officially-licensed leagues:

All the teams in these leagues are fully-licensed in PES 2019 (having the exclusive rights to the Russian league means PES 2019 has the likes of CSKA Moscow, Zenit St Petersburg and Spartak Moscow). It also means PES 2019 will let you play an officially-licensed Old Firm derby, which is pretty cool.

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