New York, 2000... ...Without knowing how or why, Brian, a student on the verge of graduating from college, is attacked by Mafia gangsters. During his desperate getaway, in the company of a mysterious striptease dancer, he ends up meeting a wide range of unusual characters.
Release Date: Aug 18, 2003
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Includes 5 items: Runaway, A Road Adventure, Runaway, The Dream of The Turtle, Runaway: A Twist of Fate, The Next BIG Thing, Yesterday

 

About This Game

New York, 2000...
...Without knowing how or why, Brian, a student on the verge of graduating from college, is attacked by Mafia gangsters.
During his desperate getaway, in the company of a mysterious striptease dancer, he ends up meeting a wide range of unusual characters. But which ones are trying to help him and which ones are planning to blow his head off?
You will have to be very ingenious to figure it out, without forgetting that nobody is who they seem in this explosive mixture of murder, money, ambition, santeria rituals and deception...a whole lot of deception.
  • Approximately 100 settings that are visually rich, containing 30 interactive characters.
  • Characters with soft edges, real-time lighting and shading effects, camera changes, panoramic shots and more.
  • High-quality stereo sound, an original soundtrack with over 24 songs.
  • 3D characters with a cartoon look and high-impact visual features that include 2D and 3D in an unmatchable style.

System Requirements

    Minimum: Windows 95/98/ME/2000/XP, Pentium™ 200 MMX, 64 MB RAM, 630 MB hard disk drive, Monitor and graphics card (DirectX™ compatible) with support for 1024x768 and 16-bit color, DirectX™ compatible sound card, Mouse and keyboard
Helpful customer reviews
38 of 38 people (100%) found this review helpful
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 30, 2014
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>>>>>>>>>>This is my review account, because the low playtime.<<<<<<<<<<<

The Spanish developer Pendulo whistles to the current trend to the third dimension: puzzle, Runaway and talk before drawn 2D backgrounds. The designers prove a huge portion of attention to detail, so that all scenes look like cheap suspicious comic sketches: The Natural History Museum in Chicago, the western town of Douglasville, the tour bus of a transvestite trio - there alone exploring the locations fun.

Against the puzzle diversity in Runaway each puzzle magazine looks pretty old from: Here's needs as a pinch of mathematics to produce the fuel mixture right. Something Combinatorics helps then the color code. A touch of acoustic theory, and the melodic number entering the security door loses its terror. In most cases you do not need any special skills to solve a problem: your imagination and creativity are the components that give the colorful puzzle cocktail his entertaining touch. Especially towards the end some quizzes act but a bit far-fetched.

Instead players get bored with a sequence of individual puzzles sided Spanish developers all six chapters, each with a large main task. This consists of dozens of interconnected single puzzle. Especially the seemingly simplest tasks turn out to be hard nuts. An example: The required object is in a cabinet that can only be opened with speech recognition. No problem, we have a voice recorder in the inventory and take the necessary voice. Play now only the band's very easy - at least if the battery of the dictation would not suddenly give up the ghost.

So make adventure games mood: instead of frown on illogical puzzles, I smile in the face of original puzzles, funny characters and elaborate dialogues. But the rescue operation in the third chapter deserves the title "absolute top class" and offers the same entertainment value as the high-class LucasArts adventure. Speaking of high class: I have rarely experienced in PC games such good speakers.

The identification with the main character Brian Basco I find especially so easily because I represent no superheroes, but the likeable guy next door. Thanks to the exciting story I could hardly separate from Runaway, and had a disadvantage: Recently I had Brian, Gina and sushi really fallen in love with, was already the interactive road movie to end. It has pretty much everything you'd want out of a solid adventure gaming experience.

Score: 79 / 100
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17 of 18 people (94%) found this review helpful
13.9 hrs on record
Posted: December 23, 2014
It's a mixed bag that I can only really recommend to old school adventure game aficionados. The puzzles can be pretty lame in their nonsensical logic or the proverbial hunt the pixel game for that one item you are missing to be able to make any headway while searching through several screens worth of pixels... also the story itself is... well amusing if you like cheesy, trite, and hackneyed plots with a supposedly genius protagonist that acts like a ♥♥♥♥♥ throughout.

Basically a pretty underwhelming effort that you can skip at your leisure. Give it a go but don't be afraid to just go straight for a walkthrough so it doesn't feel like too much of a waste of time.
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9 of 9 people (100%) found this review helpful
5.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 2, 2014
There is a puzzle in this game where the solution requires you to have had the foresight to predict that a tranvestite black woman used to be a basketball player without the game indicating this may have the been the case. Unless of course the assumption relies on racial stereotyping? This game was silly unintentionally hilarious garbage, but I have never laughed so hard at, (although I do mean AT) an adventure game as much as I had this one. To be fair, most of the puzzles are usually pretty reasonable, but the occasional leap in logic plus the game's overall very corny writing make this a work of art in the genre of funny shlock. Would recommend to anyone who likes that sort of thing. I know I do.
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5 of 5 people (100%) found this review helpful
7.1 hrs on record
Posted: August 10, 2014
Runaway, A Road Adventure, is a point and click adventure game from Pendulo studios. It is the first game in the Runaway series. Action begins in New York City, and takes you for a cross country road trip as you uncover the secrets behind a Hopi artifact while trying to avoid mob hitmen hot on your trail.

With point and click adventure games, two of the most important aspects are the story and the puzzles. The story in Runaway is gripping enough to keep you interested throughout. As the story progresses, you will uncover more and more about the artifact, while also coming up with daring rescue and escape plans to keep yourself and Gina safe from the mob. It is not without its flaws, however. A lot of the story could be described as White Knight, the game. You play a nerdy student named Brian who almost immediately falls in love with Gina, and will do anything for her. As a player, you don't have much interaction with Gina, since she disappears for one reason or another after the beginning cutscene of almost every chapter. So, sometimes you ask yourself why he is bothering to do all this stuff for her. Even though he has these feelings for her, at one point he is very quickly willing to give her up for lost, which did not gel with all of his actions to that point. It was a little confusing, and made me think that the main character is a little fickle with his emotions. The overall payoff of the story was good, and worth seeing through to the end. There is even a small set up for another game if you stick through to watch after the end credits.

The puzzles do not live up to the quality of the story. I had some issues with the fact that you will need to search through certain areas multiple times to find all the objects they contain. At one point, a bag contains three items you need, but you can only find one item at a time as the story progresses. There is also a puzzle that makes you transition through multiple scenes 5 times just to solve, which seemed like busy work after a while. For the most part, I found that a lot of the puzzles used "adventure game logic", meaning that you will be using a lot of items in illogical ways to proceed. Nothing as bad as a cat hair mustache, but a lot of things along that line. The good thing is that you can't really fail, and the characters you can speak to will give you hints sometimes to point you in the right direction. So, sometimes you just have to keep plugging along until you figure everything out.

The graphics are a bit of a mixed bag. The backgrounds for the most part are very detailed and well done. The first part of the game will have you going between a variety of areas, and you don't know where you will end of next. The entire second half of the game takes place in the desert, and while they try to mix it up by giving you lots of areas to explore, it can get rather repetitive. The characters have a cartoonish feel to them, and look generally well drawn during gameplay. The cutscenes have a noticeable drop in quality, with character faces lacking a lot of detail. Also, why do Brian's shorts have to be so short for the second half of the game?

Voice acting is not great but not terrible either. It won't distract you from enjoying the game, but I felt like sometimes there was a good amount of emotion lacking in the lines. The were some songs written specifically for this game, and one song in particular you will probably hear so much that you will get sick of.

Controls follow the basic point and click model. Left click to move, double click on an exit to travel quickly, right click to switch between look and grab. The inventory can be accessed at the top of the screen. Sometimes it was a little difficult to find the exact pixel you had to be on to interact with an object, but that only happened a few times.

Overall, I would recommend this game, but just barely. The story was enough to overcome the flaws with the puzzles, and while the art wasn't amazing to look at, it kept me interested. I was entertained enough that I want to check out the sequel.

Grade: C
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7 of 11 people (64%) found this review helpful
9.9 hrs on record
Posted: October 14, 2014
As a veteran of point-and-click games I eventually had to pick this one up (part of an heavily discounted Pendulo Adventure Pack). I have played plenty of games from the genre and they all come with their flaws and thankfully have their respective merits. Long story short - I had yet to play an adventure game I didnt enjoy. Had...

Honestly, I could never really get into this game. From the first room I ran into trouble progressing. It is no news that some adevnture games contain illogical or infuriating puzzles, but usually you get the hang of it by carefully reading the dialogue and/or exploring. I had to heavily use a guide, when I usually refuse to use guides at all, as they destroy the purpose of those games but in the end I prefer it over examinating every pixel in every room every time you progress a little bit. When you can only progress by trial and error, fun gets work and finishing this one was alot of work.
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
13.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 11, 2014
Runaway: A Road Adventure is a point-and-click (P&C) adventure game which, by design, it is no more than your typical P&C game from the ‘90s.

The story centres around Brian Basco, an initially shy and nerdy Physics graduate from New York whose life totally changes the moment he almost runs over an admittedly hot chick, Gina Timmins, with his car. Could this be faith? Taking her quickly to the hospital, Brian soon finds out that the mafia gang is after her as a result of possessing an enigmatic crucifix given by her father which she pledged to protect. From here on out, it is knowable what is about to happen and is already hinted in the title itself: become runaways chased by the mafia whilst trying to decipher the mystery behind the crucifix.

While the set up already sounds painfully cheesy, enough to put it next to your minty collection of B-movies from the ‘80s, the overall story is actually decent for an adventure game once you witness the conclusion at the end. In fact most of the story’s writing is corny, but feels shamelessly light-hearted. Split into six chapters, it becomes evident after the second chapter that the story itself is something which must not be taken too seriously – in a good way. It can be wacky (like some of the extravagant support characters) and ridiculous at times (I lost it at the “abduction” part), weirdly making it a very amusing, yet silly, experience. The story builds up well as the game progress, but loses some steam about the second last chapter. It provides several funny moments, but there will be a debate on whether this is because they are intelligently funny or because they are so bluntly stereotypical, corny and a bit sexist. Kind of like laughing at a joke which seemed good on paper but was abysmally delivered. When the story does get serious, it can feel like you are playing a low-budget Broken Sword game. And there is plenty inspiration taken from the first two Broken Sword games displayed in here.

Runaway: A Road Adventure is possibly one of the hardest adventure games you will ever play when it comes to solving puzzles. This can either turn into one of the most satisfying moments of the day when you singlehandedly discover the solution to a challenging puzzle, or the most induced rage you will ever exhibit. In general, the puzzles are mostly logical and varied especially in the first few chapters. Conversely, they are exceptionally unintuitive and require a lot of pixel-hunting. A lot. This will be the thing which will turn off most people, but if you are patient and like actual challenges, then this will be rewarding because the puzzles are truly enjoyable -- a bit absurd and scientifically inaccurate at times though -- once you realise their solutions. Obviously, there are still some awful puzzles which require a lot of backtracking for instance, mainly in the second last chapter. Honestly, that chapter was not well designed from a puzzle solving point of view. An advice is to have a walkthrough next to you just in case you get completely stuck at any point. Also, minor puzzle spoiler: getting high is a solution to one of the puzzles. Greatest puzzle ever?

The graphics are impressive in respect to the hand-drawn backgrounds, which might be the main reason why anyone would be attracted by this game in the first place. There is a variety of nicely drawn locations the player can visit, although the last three chapters are featured in the same dessert setting, so it can be argued that it loses some of its magic in the second half. Sadly, the animations in this game are subpar. The closer the camera is to a character model, the uglier they get. This ugliness can range from realising how bland the models are to their very static facial movements. Similar moments are also noticeable in many of the game’s CGI cutscenes which can be a bit horrific to watch. For instance, there is a particular animation of Gina crawling on the ground which looks dreadfully creepy. Thus, retrospectively, the animations did not age well. Rewind eleven years back, I would probably have been happy with them.

The voice acting is a mixed bag. It is average at best, but enough not to harm the playtime experience. On the other hand, the more hours you sink into the game the more you will get comfortable hearing the voices. Sadly, that is not applicable for some of the support characters who simply make you beg to turn off the audio completely in an instant. Inevitably there will be two or three characters which turn out to sound annoying, not necessarily because of the voice actor’s capabilities but the way some deliver their lines – intentionally over-the-top. The audio compression is also poor, making the dialogues sound fuzzy at times. And this, if you did not know, is not an adventure game from the mid-‘90s which all sounded as if the voices were recorded in a tin can back then. Frankly, the fuzziness is not distracting at all, but rather noticeable when characters talk. Lastly, the soundtrack is solid, without a disappointing track.

One personal annoyance is Gina’s portrayal and lack of involvement in the game. Most of time she is either unconscious, kept locked as a hostage or unable to move due to injury making her useless in helping Brian in any of his tasks. Honestly, she is a pathetic damsel in distress with some admirable “assets”. Thankfully, there are signs of personality and humanness to her character than it meets the eye by the end of the duo's adventure. Yet, she lacked any solid character development throughout most of the story, giving little reason to feel attached to her as a character.

In conclusion, Runaway: A Road Adventure is an adventure game which you will either love for superbly replicating that old-school and wacky feel of classic adventure games -- or hate for its unintuitive puzzles and low production values in the audio and animation departments in particular. Unlike more modern adventure games with damsels in distress, such as Deponia which shares almost the same critical flaws, Runaway: A Road Adventure has a lot more charm. Maybe because it does not take itself too seriously, just the way Monkey Island was more of a comedy-oriented adventure game (of course, the latter had top-notch production values which outshine Runaway in all aspects). Regardless, while there is a lot of room for improvement, the story alone provides enough inceptive to invest time into this adventure until the end if you like wacky fast-ride adventures.
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
10.1 hrs on record
Posted: September 26, 2014
A nice little point and click series. Not the best out there, put worth a play if you like the genre.
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7 of 12 people (58%) found this review helpful
11.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 30, 2014
When I play adventure games, usually I like to play a compelling protagonist, solve ingenius puzzles, and meet a colourful cast of interesting characters. Unfortunately, Runaway fails on all counts, and then finds some more levels to fail on, in case I was not sufficiently put off from it with it's sheer audacious ineptitude alone.

The art, while competent in it's backgrounds and interesting in the execution of the cel-shaded comic style, fell short when rendering the characters, whose bodies float around while their mouths snap into keys, a discordant, stilted animation method that only serves to both highlight the failings of the watery bodies and the limited mouth animations. The character designs ranged from by the numbers boring, to overwhelmingly offensive and reductive. Racist stereotypes pop up again and again, gentle and unassuming, as if the writers thought nothing of their inclusion, with a literally yellow faced asian lady at one juncture, and a Tojo-style bucktooth japanese stereotype popping up later. The game seemed to take great pleasure in exaggerating features that weren't part of the caucasian face. While Brian and Gina were bland to the point of soporific, some of the supporting cast were so caricatured as to make them inhuman. The resulting mashup was incredibly distracting, and often insulting. It didn't fit together well.

The puzzle design was some of the worst I've ever seen - and unquestioned in it's sociopathy. Oftentimes the solution to a puzzle is to destroy some great work of art, or a career, or simply make someone's life worse for Brian's gain. Other puzzles involve leaps of logic so great as to bring into question the world this game was made in. Filling lipstick tubes with gunpowder, for instance, apparently makes for bullets. In what sane universe would this not just melt the lipstick and cause a jam in a gun? And Peanut Butter made by heating butter with some peanuts. Not only do the puzzle solutions often not make sense, but are literally antithetical to the goal you are trying to achieve. Brian will, at times, do something that is counterproductive to his aims for no real reason other than to prolong the game's running time. He is also an incredibly inconsistent hypocrit, refusing to steal some things because "he is a decent guy" and gleefully stealing and destroying other items because "they won't miss it". The amount of unquestioned property damage in this game is staggering. I was actively rooting for something horrible to happen to the protagonist by the end, as he got everything he ever wanted and more, as he complained about being lied to while lying out of his ♥♥♥ at every opportunity, and as he made everyone's lives a living hell while they did nothing but be accomodating to him.

From the very beginning, the insufferable Brian Basco comes across as a bland, entitled dudebro, whose complete disregard for his fellow human beings' safety is only matched by his lack of personality traits. I can only sum him up as some kind of dark, unfathomable void-beast who wants to go to Berkley University. In his quest for getting the female supporting protagonist, Brian poisons, strongarms, and causes the death of all who get in his way. He is unaffected by the death of friends, loved ones, and nothing bad that happens around him ever seems to stick - upon being told to not mourn by a Hopi Ghost, for example, he instantly feels better and snaps back to being the insufferable twit that he normally is.

Mentioning the Hopi, an important point has to be brought up. The Hopi, in the game's setting, appear to be a extinct tribe that have only a presence through spirits and ghosts, when in reality the Hopi are still a political presence in Arizona, with several towns. It reinforces the awful "Native Americans are Already Dead" tropes that resonate throughout media, which is part lie and part incredible racism, of which this game has in spades.

The story is at it's heart, forgettable, but only through Brian Basco's audacious awfulness is it elevated to a travesty. The twist in the plot takes five out of six chapters to come to fruition, and it is such a damp squib of a twist that you question why you even bothered with the game in the first place. The game's setup promises intrigue that the game ultimately does not deliver on. It barely engages more than morbid curiousity, let alone any proper intrigue. The game sets up a mystical element that ultimately only serves to give our hero yet another item and a pat on the back when he loses something. The love interest element is sickeningly underwritten and overemphasised, mainly when our hero reminds the supporting cast, and the player that he is not gay. His love interest spends most of the time unconscious, indisposed, or absent. What spark they could have had is never shown on screen, just that he thinks she is beautiful, and ergo he needs her. And she wants him for an unknown reason, probably because he hit her with his car and she needs protection. She is an eternal damsel, and her story is never expanded upon, even though it is far, far more interesting than his,

Describing Runaway as a power fantasy would be completely apt - Brian Basco represents the nadir of the human being, but still gets everything he ever wanted while reassuring himself, and being reassured, that he is the Decent Nice Guy Who Gets The Girl. It is almost sickening how pornographically this game presents us our "hero", in the sense that everything he does brings him everything he ever wanted, he never faces any real, lasting trauma or tragedy. No character development, just a stagnation into the awful person he always was, and will always continue to be.

Runaway is exactly what you should do when faced with this game.
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10 of 18 people (56%) found this review helpful
16.6 hrs on record
Posted: October 24, 2014
Do you like point and click games? Me too!

Do you like pixel hunts? Do you like not being able to solve a puzzle because you clicked the nail on the hammer instead of the hammer on the nail? Do you like strong female protagonists who become incapacitated every five minutes so that the male lead can save them? Do you like to play as a bro-ish, self entitled cis male who uses people and lies, but thinks he's an outstanding dude? Do you like racial stereotypes? Me neither.

I love this genre and try never to look at the walkthrough, but I found this such an unpleasant experience that I stopped even caring towards the end. Often, they relied on intense pixel hunting--in one instance you actually go to the desert and have to pick up a specific rock. Some puzzles rely on truly obscure knowledge, like how you can theoretically get extra life out of a battery by exposing it to extreme cold.

I don't want to ramble. Point is, this game isn't merely "not good", it's bad. I found it painful, and Steam has plenty of alternatives in the same price range.
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5 of 9 people (56%) found this review helpful
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 25, 2014
Listening to the narration of this game was like hammering a whiny, high-pitched spike into my skull. It was so bad that I was unable to actually play the game, as I couldn't make it past the second interruption by the narrator without alt-tabbing and shutting off the game. Why it was considered a good idea to begin the game with a pointless monologue by the most dislikeable character conceivable, I do not know.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
15.6 hrs on record
Posted: October 29, 2014
Pros: Fairly fluid user controls/interface- it's easy to acclimate to fast. The digital-animation-on-illustrated-backgrounds art direction is relatively unique- and sometimes quite nice. It's generally pretty entertaining. It encourages the player to actually want to solve the mysteries. It's a decently good low to mid-level length for a casual player. [Ignore my time played, I left the game running while away] The music is certainly interesting. It can be frankly hilarious in that unintentional, truly bad B-movie way.

Cons: The animation itself is laughable- sort of a pro and a con. Even for the time period, it's pretty bad. The story line has a plethora of holes and issues if you pay much attention. There are nigh-endless amounts of rampant racism and sexism. The main character isn't actually very likable: not as smart as he should be for his background, not as good or nice of a person as he's touted as, not a bad or tricky enough person to be much fun otherwise. I actually actively disliked him- not so great. The 'science' that happens in the puzzles is often hilariously nonsensical. A lot of the 'twists' are predictable. It can get fairly pixel-hunt-y at times.

Overall, I'd recommend this to anyone a bit older who's looking for a casual, silly, fast ride of the adventure-game type. It'll be no fun if it's taken too seriously- and I could see it being quite annoying and super offensive for some. It's not for kids. If you're looking for anything like Monkey Island, don't bother.
Personally, I didn't deplore it, but I certainly didn't love it, either. I would settle for 'It definitely filled my time and kept me amused, but wow that really wasn't very good.' It's hard for me to flat out say if I'd reccommend it or not- I would, but only for specific types of players.
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