TROPICO RELOADED es la recopilación fundamental para los aprendices a dictador y todos aquellos que sueñan con tener su propia isla caribeña. Tropico combina estrategia en tiempo real (RTS) y elementos de simulación con una buena dosis de intriga política y estilo caribeño para crear una experiencia de juego única y aclamada por la...
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Fecha de lanzamiento: 24 jul. 2009

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Comprar Tropico Trilogy

Incluye 4 artículos: Tropico 2: Pirate Cove, Tropico 3 - Steam Special Edition, Tropico 3: Absolute Power , Tropico Reloaded

 

Acerca de este juego

TROPICO RELOADED es la recopilación fundamental para los aprendices a dictador y todos aquellos que sueñan con tener su propia isla caribeña. Tropico combina estrategia en tiempo real (RTS) y elementos de simulación con una buena dosis de intriga política y estilo caribeño para crear una experiencia de juego única y aclamada por la crítica.

TROPICO

Tú eres el único dirigente de una remota república bananera. Lucha contra la pobreza, la corrupción y los rebeldes, haz feliz a tu propio pueblo o impón tu mandato por la fuerza militar. Sin embargo, ¡no olvides reservárte unos cuantos dólares para tu propia jubilación en una cuenta bancaria suiza!



TROPICO — PARADISE ISLAND

La expansión oficial para el juego original no sólo trae consigo desastres naturales como tormentas tropicales, sino también nuevas atracciones turísticas para tu isla. Enfréntate a los desafíos de muchos nuevos escenarios, demuéstrate que eres un digno líder para tu pueblo y haz de Tropico un paraíso para los adinerados visitantes de ultramar.


TROPICO 2 — PIRATE COVE

Como un temido Rey Pirata, debes mantener a tus bucaneros y prisioneros bajo control y enviar sus barcos a la caza del tesoro. Además de contar con un entorno totalmente nuevo, la secuela oficial de Tropico ofrece mejoras en su jugabilidad, nuevas características y escenarios.



Características principales:
  • Incluye el original Tropico, la expansión Paradise Island y Tropico 2: Pirate Cove
  • Más de 100 escenarios
  • Generador de mapas aleatorios para un infinito número de desafíos

Requisitos del sistema

    • SO: Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7
    • Procesador: 1.6 GHz
    • Memoria: 256 MB de RAM
    • Gráficos: Tarjeta gráfica con 128 MB y compatible con DirectX® 9
    • DirectX®: 9
    • Disco Duro: 3 GB de espacio libre
    • Sonido: Compatible con DirectX
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Muy positivos (265 análisis)
Publicados recientemente
tupungato
( 11.0 h registradas )
Publicado el 30 de junio
Classic city building game where you become a dictator on an exotic island.

There is always too little of something. People are hungry, people want religion, soldiers want power, USA wants democracy, intelectuals want elections, tourists want less polution, workers want more money. You balance the situation by building stuff or issuing political edicts.

Gameplay is easy to learn and fun.

Enjoy this oldie!
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Sarkoth
( 2.4 h registradas )
Publicado el 19 de junio
The original city builder games. Very deep, quite hilarious. If only all problems always could be solved with stocking enough rum.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Audish
( 3.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 10 de junio
Since this package includes both Tropico and Tropico 2, I've chosen to review each individually. Spoiler alert: They haven't aged well.

Tropico

The original Tropico came to us during one of the peaks of the city-building genre, right in between Simcity 3000 and 4. You play the dictator of a Caribbean banana republic in the height of the Cold War, building industries and services, issuing edicts, and managing your people as you see fit. It's a more personal game, with every one of your citizens simulated with their own schedules and desires and opinions. Tropico was undeniably ahead of its time and its reception suffered a bit for that. With the benefit of a decade plus of refinement on the formula, however, its flaws are sadly clearer than ever.

Every scenario in Tropico starts you off on an island with the most basic provisions of society, such as farms, shacks, a port, and a palace for your unseen dictator. From there you build farms to feed your people, industries to export goods, housing to get your people out of shacks, and all manner of services from clinics to churches to schools. Each of your citizens has nearly a dozen factors that influence their happiness, and success means keeping these as high as possible. Your control over policy is incredibly granular, allowing you to set wages and management styles at businesses, influence immigration rates, add upgrades to factories. This is to say nothing of the dozens of edicts you can issue, and random events that can have huge effects on your island.

It's an incredibly promising formula that sadly was not fully realized in its first iteration. The chief offender is the citizen simulation, which proved to be more limiting than anything. Your people have to get to work, get something to eat, find some way to unwind, and get home, with each of those steps having a real-time effect on your economy. That means your island can easily go bankrupt if your dockworkers take too long loading ships, or your teamsters get distracted from carting cigars to market. There are bugs in the staffing system as well... I had my clinics and hospitals completely unmanned for decades despite having dozens of qualified workers at lower-paying jobs.

The rest of the systems are similarly half-baked. Your edicts can provide food for the people, prohibit alcohol, change relations with the US or USSR, and disappear some of your problematic citizens. But many of them have very marginal or even detrimental net effects. Relations with the superpowers are difficult to manage in any meaningful way with your limited diplomacy tools. The whole Swiss bank system is also more trouble than it's worth, because the main way to funnel money into your account is to make all your buildings 20% more expensive, which just makes playing the game harder. A large number of buildings and edicts happen to be locked behind providing electricity to your island as well, which is ludicrously expensive and rarely necessary to complete scenarios in the first place.

The whole thing is built on the old, voxelly Railroad Tycoon II engine which gives it a quaint, photo-scanned look but makes it incredibly hard to see elevations as they lie. This will cause you plenty of headaches when trying to build buildings anywhere near each other as you builders have to flatten terrain completely to build. The sound design is solid and contributes to the peppy, kitschy feel of the game, but does clash with the dry look of it. There's no campaign, just sandbox and scenarios that give you basic goals to shoot for over 50 years.

The series has come a long way since the original, which only makes it harder to accept this entry's flaws. Everything there is to appreciate about Tropico has been done better from 3 and on, with nothing left to tickle your nostalgia. I was looking forward to revisiting this title after bouncing off it in my youth, but it proved just as frustrating now as it did then.

Tropico 2: Pirate Cove

It comes as no surprise that Tropico 2 is the black sheep of the series. The only one to break from the banana republic formula, Pirate Cove has you as a pirate king, ruling over an island of buccaneers and captive laborers. It's a novel concept, and I can't be the only gamer who's dreamed of building their own Tortuga, rife with brawling and wenching. And so it was that I came to Tropico 2 with high hopes, and left with them dashed against the rocks.

There are more than a few notable changes from the original Tropico in this installment. As mentioned, you have two separate populations to manage, pirates and captives. Pirates man your ships and keep your island safe, while captives provide all the labor and services pirates need to stay happy. You'll need to shower your sea dogs with booze, wenches, and cards to keep them satisfied, whereas captives must be kept fearful and complacent to minimize the risk of escape. It's an interesting dynamic that mostly works, though a few of your tools for maintaining the nebulous Order and Anarchy figures are things like skull topiaries and cartoonish piles of bones, belonging more in Rollercoaster Tycoon than this title.

Mechanically, the game is even more distant from its predecessor. Almost all buildings are locked to roads and cost no money to build, instead requiring lumber chopped from camps and milled into planks. There's a greater emphasis on supply chains as well, with individual units of corn going from farm to brewery, being brewed into grog, then going from brewery to tavern. Every building has its own hauler in addition to the usual workers, and some have overseers which are usually unoccupied pirates. Much of your production will be in rations and weapons for your ships, which you order out on plundering or kidnapping missions to score gold, captives, and resources on a strategic map.

All of this makes a pretty good setup for a management game, and indeed the first few missions of the robust campaign roll along with promise. The moment you hit the fourth mission, however, the whole thing comes apart. Once you are charged with maintaining the happiness of your pirates and complacency of your captives, you discover just how little control you have over them and how fragile it is. You cannot assign captives to specific jobs, so a little thing like having no hauler for your tavern means it never gets grog, meaning none of your pirates can drink, meaning you're about to have a mutiny on your hands. Same problem if you can't keep enough female captives for your farms and brothels, or even workmen at your lumber camps.

There are simply too many random elements to make the game reliably fun, even in the campaign. In my first attempt at one mission, based around kidnapping key workers, my ship was randomly sunk which forced a restart. On the next attempt I had no extra male captives to man the lumber yard, which meant I couldn't do anything for the first year of a five-year mission. And despite the excellent tutorials and advisor, there are some incredibly poor design decisions. In the first mission where you must manage pirate happiness, you're locked from building them any sort of residence, a key happiness indicator. The whole thing smacks of decent concepts taken to faulty conclusions.

The graphics share the crisp sprite charm of the original, but the pirate motif is far more forced in the stylings and will start to grate once frustration at the mechanics sets in. As much as I like the concept, it's ultimately a game about the most boring part of piracy, and abstracts all the good bits behind charts and text pop-ups. I still think it's possible to get a good game out of managing an island of degenerates, but this certainly isn't it.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
mellish2
( 14.5 h registradas )
Publicado el 5 de junio
A very solid city-builder. Happiness is near impossible to keep in the highs, but hey at leat i'm rich!
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Fay
( 2.6 h registradas )
Publicado el 14 de mayo
Played until i was retired. It was fun :).
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Grey-Coven
( 24.7 h registradas )
Publicado el 4 de mayo
An interesting part of the game is you can't possibly fulfill all the wants and needs of the people on the island. You can try to please everyone with limited success or pick certain groups to make really happy at the price of angering a different group. Of course you have help, soldiers, state run media and a few other things.

Building space is limited by the size of your island. There is some customization of your starting resources and island. Also the el presidente that you play. What strengths and weaknesses you have.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Denwell
( 17.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 30 de abril
Great game for the inner dictator in all of us
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Orrenman
( 9.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 25 de abril
Great game, a classic that still holds up perfectly. played this a ton as a kid, on the Mac, and got nostalgic and have put in a few hours into it again via steam.

Honestly if you're worried whether you'll like any Tropico Games - baring Tropico 2 - get this one as a cheap feeler, they're all the same game. (but i liked tropico 2!)


I do have three things though:

1) new glitches i've never seen before. when i say i played this a ton as a kid, i mean it was one of the three games i had when i was 10 on my macbook. and boy did i push what i had to it's limits. maybe the original mac version was just made of better stuff, but it was one of the sturdiest games i've still ever played. This copy from Steam though has a number of little things - sometimes when construction starts, the building instantly appears in the process of demolition; graphical errors; dropped/lagged mouse inputs; etc - nothing big or really damaging, just odd. didn't stop me from enjoying it. i sware the AI pathing is somehow worse though.

2) Full screen = 1600x800 with a black boarder around the whole game. no adjustmant. didn't stop me from playing, just seems kinda stupid.

3) no 'P' for pause. not 'esc' for menu. these might be, for somereason, only on mac releases, but seriously? it's an old game, i get it, but its not so old that its keybindings have to be frustrating. and i remember them being completely intuitive as a kid. this is just weird.

PS. again, maybe just a difference between the Mac and PC releases, but the intro video is different.

TL;DR - Amazing game, play it. want it perfect? get it on mac in 2002.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
evilcyber
( 1.4 h registradas )
Publicado el 7 de abril
Tropico, but with _pirates_!

Yup, it's a city builder/resource gathering game. But Pirates!

You're Pirate Captain, this is your island, make it big! command a fleet!

Graphics are a bit dated, but still a fun play as a break from the standard style of the genre.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Wedge
( 0.4 h registradas )
Publicado el 1 de abril
I feel like communist owning this game.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Análisis más útiles  En los últimos 30 días
A 7 de 10 personas (70%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
3.1 h registradas
Publicado el 10 de junio
Since this package includes both Tropico and Tropico 2, I've chosen to review each individually. Spoiler alert: They haven't aged well.

Tropico

The original Tropico came to us during one of the peaks of the city-building genre, right in between Simcity 3000 and 4. You play the dictator of a Caribbean banana republic in the height of the Cold War, building industries and services, issuing edicts, and managing your people as you see fit. It's a more personal game, with every one of your citizens simulated with their own schedules and desires and opinions. Tropico was undeniably ahead of its time and its reception suffered a bit for that. With the benefit of a decade plus of refinement on the formula, however, its flaws are sadly clearer than ever.

Every scenario in Tropico starts you off on an island with the most basic provisions of society, such as farms, shacks, a port, and a palace for your unseen dictator. From there you build farms to feed your people, industries to export goods, housing to get your people out of shacks, and all manner of services from clinics to churches to schools. Each of your citizens has nearly a dozen factors that influence their happiness, and success means keeping these as high as possible. Your control over policy is incredibly granular, allowing you to set wages and management styles at businesses, influence immigration rates, add upgrades to factories. This is to say nothing of the dozens of edicts you can issue, and random events that can have huge effects on your island.

It's an incredibly promising formula that sadly was not fully realized in its first iteration. The chief offender is the citizen simulation, which proved to be more limiting than anything. Your people have to get to work, get something to eat, find some way to unwind, and get home, with each of those steps having a real-time effect on your economy. That means your island can easily go bankrupt if your dockworkers take too long loading ships, or your teamsters get distracted from carting cigars to market. There are bugs in the staffing system as well... I had my clinics and hospitals completely unmanned for decades despite having dozens of qualified workers at lower-paying jobs.

The rest of the systems are similarly half-baked. Your edicts can provide food for the people, prohibit alcohol, change relations with the US or USSR, and disappear some of your problematic citizens. But many of them have very marginal or even detrimental net effects. Relations with the superpowers are difficult to manage in any meaningful way with your limited diplomacy tools. The whole Swiss bank system is also more trouble than it's worth, because the main way to funnel money into your account is to make all your buildings 20% more expensive, which just makes playing the game harder. A large number of buildings and edicts happen to be locked behind providing electricity to your island as well, which is ludicrously expensive and rarely necessary to complete scenarios in the first place.

The whole thing is built on the old, voxelly Railroad Tycoon II engine which gives it a quaint, photo-scanned look but makes it incredibly hard to see elevations as they lie. This will cause you plenty of headaches when trying to build buildings anywhere near each other as you builders have to flatten terrain completely to build. The sound design is solid and contributes to the peppy, kitschy feel of the game, but does clash with the dry look of it. There's no campaign, just sandbox and scenarios that give you basic goals to shoot for over 50 years.

The series has come a long way since the original, which only makes it harder to accept this entry's flaws. Everything there is to appreciate about Tropico has been done better from 3 and on, with nothing left to tickle your nostalgia. I was looking forward to revisiting this title after bouncing off it in my youth, but it proved just as frustrating now as it did then.

Tropico 2: Pirate Cove

It comes as no surprise that Tropico 2 is the black sheep of the series. The only one to break from the banana republic formula, Pirate Cove has you as a pirate king, ruling over an island of buccaneers and captive laborers. It's a novel concept, and I can't be the only gamer who's dreamed of building their own Tortuga, rife with brawling and wenching. And so it was that I came to Tropico 2 with high hopes, and left with them dashed against the rocks.

There are more than a few notable changes from the original Tropico in this installment. As mentioned, you have two separate populations to manage, pirates and captives. Pirates man your ships and keep your island safe, while captives provide all the labor and services pirates need to stay happy. You'll need to shower your sea dogs with booze, wenches, and cards to keep them satisfied, whereas captives must be kept fearful and complacent to minimize the risk of escape. It's an interesting dynamic that mostly works, though a few of your tools for maintaining the nebulous Order and Anarchy figures are things like skull topiaries and cartoonish piles of bones, belonging more in Rollercoaster Tycoon than this title.

Mechanically, the game is even more distant from its predecessor. Almost all buildings are locked to roads and cost no money to build, instead requiring lumber chopped from camps and milled into planks. There's a greater emphasis on supply chains as well, with individual units of corn going from farm to brewery, being brewed into grog, then going from brewery to tavern. Every building has its own hauler in addition to the usual workers, and some have overseers which are usually unoccupied pirates. Much of your production will be in rations and weapons for your ships, which you order out on plundering or kidnapping missions to score gold, captives, and resources on a strategic map.

All of this makes a pretty good setup for a management game, and indeed the first few missions of the robust campaign roll along with promise. The moment you hit the fourth mission, however, the whole thing comes apart. Once you are charged with maintaining the happiness of your pirates and complacency of your captives, you discover just how little control you have over them and how fragile it is. You cannot assign captives to specific jobs, so a little thing like having no hauler for your tavern means it never gets grog, meaning none of your pirates can drink, meaning you're about to have a mutiny on your hands. Same problem if you can't keep enough female captives for your farms and brothels, or even workmen at your lumber camps.

There are simply too many random elements to make the game reliably fun, even in the campaign. In my first attempt at one mission, based around kidnapping key workers, my ship was randomly sunk which forced a restart. On the next attempt I had no extra male captives to man the lumber yard, which meant I couldn't do anything for the first year of a five-year mission. And despite the excellent tutorials and advisor, there are some incredibly poor design decisions. In the first mission where you must manage pirate happiness, you're locked from building them any sort of residence, a key happiness indicator. The whole thing smacks of decent concepts taken to faulty conclusions.

The graphics share the crisp sprite charm of the original, but the pirate motif is far more forced in the stylings and will start to grate once frustration at the mechanics sets in. As much as I like the concept, it's ultimately a game about the most boring part of piracy, and abstracts all the good bits behind charts and text pop-ups. I still think it's possible to get a good game out of managing an island of degenerates, but this certainly isn't it.
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 1 de 1 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
11.0 h registradas
Publicado el 30 de junio
Classic city building game where you become a dictator on an exotic island.

There is always too little of something. People are hungry, people want religion, soldiers want power, USA wants democracy, intelectuals want elections, tourists want less polution, workers want more money. You balance the situation by building stuff or issuing political edicts.

Gameplay is easy to learn and fun.

Enjoy this oldie!
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
Análisis más útiles  Global
A 15 de 16 personas (94%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
7.6 h registradas
Publicado el 27 de abril de 2014
Tropico 1:
Excelente juego, para sentirte todo un Dictador.

Tropico 2 - pirate cove:
lo mismo que arriba solo que en versión pirata xD

Tropico 1 y 2 son de esos juegos que cuando los vez dices, ne ese juego no esta tan bueno... lo juegas y te quedas enganchado como otaku al anime, así que si lo juegas estate preparado, porque vas a estar sentado por horas y horas jugando.

si no lo has jugado nunca, solo te puedo decir que es de esos juegos donde tienes que construir tu ciudad desde 0%, para llevarla a la grandeza y tratar de que no te linchen (porque como todos sabemos a nadie le gustan los dictadores).
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 6 de 6 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
10.5 h registradas
Publicado el 2 de marzo de 2015
Me he llevado una grata sorpresa al jugar por primera vez a Tropico. Nunca antes lo había jugado y lo he jugado por primera vez en esta excelente plataforma. A pesar de ser un juego del 2001, me ha gustado mucho tanto en su jugabilidad como su aspecto gráfico, ni que hablar de su temática que para aquella fecha (e incluso hasta el día de hoy) es una idea sumamente creativa.

¿Y de que va, Tropico? En el juego asumes el papel de un dictador de una isla que debe de mantener contante a la gente dándoles trabajo, un sueldo digno, hogar y una gran diversidad de servicios como salud y seguridad. No solo eso, la gente de tu pueblo querrán elecciones y si no le das esta oportunidad se levantaran contra ti en forma de rebeldes. Esta claro que puedes contrastar eso si dispones de un buen grupo militar, pero tampoco le des tanto poder a los militares o tendrás un golpe de estado. A todo esto, debes de poder mantener contento a las distintas facciones: comunistas, capitalistas, intelectuales, religiosos y ambientalistas, que para tu desgracia, sus principios son opuestos entre si. Si favoreces mucho a los comunistas, es obvio que los capitalistas tendrán menos respeto hacia ti, de la misma forma ocurre entre religiosos e intelectuales y finalmente los ambientalistas están en contra de cualquier tipo de construcción, pues para hacerlas debes de talar árboles.

Finalmente resta mencionar que EE.UU y Rusia buscaran tener cierta influencia en tu isla. Alabar a uno de estos dos países, genera conflictos con el otro. Así que debes de mantener tu isla en un perfecto equilibrio si quieres permanecer en el poder la mayor cantidad de años posibles. A todo esto, no te olvides de llevarte algo de dinero para tu cuenta en Suiza, después de todo, algún día te vas a tener que jubilar.

¿Qué otra cosa puedo decir de Tropico? Ah, NO es un juego para nada fácil pese a su simpleza. Sin embargo si te gustan los juegos de administración e intriga política, es una compra asegurada.
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A 6 de 8 personas (75%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
0.1 h registradas
Publicado el 7 de julio de 2014
Juego ya antiguo que era lo mejor de su genero, como lo es ahora tropico 5. SI sabes el genero del juego sabes a lo que juegas . Quien diga que este juego es malo no tiene ni idea de videojuegos. Sin acritud.
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A 4 de 5 personas (80%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
75.3 h registradas
Publicado el 22 de septiembre de 2014
Peron simulator 2009
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A 2 de 2 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
21.0 h registradas
Publicado el 16 de diciembre de 2015
A día de hoy todavía tiene mucho que aportar. Si bien puede tirar para atrás por su dificultad, se me ocurren pocos juegos de gestión que me hayan parecido tan acertados y a la vez más divertidos.

De un duro Tropico original pasamos a un Tropico 2: Pirate Cove más accesible y más centrado en el bienestar social que en lo económico. El primero, una base estupenda. El segundo, el rarito de toda la saga.

Análisis completo de Tropico en El BloJ
http://elblojdeneojin.blogspot.com.es/2014/10/tropico.html

Análisis completo de Tropico 2 en El BloJ
http://elblojdeneojin.blogspot.com.es/2015/12/tropico-2-pirate-cove.html
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A 1 de 26 personas (4%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
0.1 h registradas
Publicado el 6 de julio de 2014
Para gustos los colores, o eso dicen, a mi toda la saga me parece penosa :/
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A 91 de 100 personas (91%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
29.8 h registradas
Publicado el 6 de diciembre de 2013
UPD: I have not touched T5 yet so I'm not mentioning it till I get to play it! That said, it's got some very favorable and well written reviews thus far, so go check 'em out!

Tropico the first's a classic. Having been a huge fan of Sim City and Tropico games (SC4/2000 and original Tropico) for years, I keep coming back to those games at least once in a couple of years just for nostalgia's sake.

Tropico 1 possesses that unique charm that nearly all the other installations, sadly, lack, alongside with some great tongue-in-cheek humor. I can say with certainty however that Tropico 4 more than made up for it and it's probably the only game out of the entire franchise worth purchasing (besides the very first one of course), seeing as T3 is just a watered down version of T4. Trust me, if you just skip on T3 you won't be missing ANYTHING. Kalypso really dropped the ball on that one.

So if you're looking to jump into the franchise, I recommend starting with either the 1st or the 4th installation, or better yet both. If you just want a fancy looking and relatively new city-building game in the spirit of SimCity, Anno and Cities XL, just skip this bundle entirely and buy T4.

Long story short: T1 started it all, T2 has pirates, T3 is an attempted but shallow reboot and T4 is an upgraded version of the previous game and what T3 should have been in the first place. Take your pick.
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A 50 de 51 personas (98%) les ha sido útil este análisis
1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
Recomendado
39.5 h registradas
Publicado el 22 de diciembre de 2013
Have you, like me, got an old, slow, crappy laptop as your only source of PC gaming? Are you wanting a game that will suck you in for most of your day off work or studies?
If so I highly recommend Tropico. I've been playing this game for many years and although it may be no where near as glossy as it's newer cousins in the series it still has a nice bit of depth to it, a superb soundtrack and a wicked sense of humour.
I love this game. It's one of the most re-visited in my collection. I hope you'll love it too.
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