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The European cultural TV channel Arte innovates and launches its first video game ! Immerse yourself in this fascinating and unique experience to uncover the history and secrets of Fonts & Characters ! Play as 2 dots and travel through the ages of typographic styles and techniques.
Release Date: Nov 6, 2013
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Buy Type:Rider

$6.99

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Type Rider exclusive promotion announcement

May 7th, 2014

Type:Rider is 50% off until May 12.
Hurry up to discover this multi-awarded typographic journey.

4 comments Read more

Reviews

“You Never Realized Fonts Could Be This Exciting”
KOTAKU

“The unlikely appeal of Type:Rider, a platformer about fonts”
Kill Screen

“TYPE:RIDER--THE "FINAL FONTASY" OF VIDEO GAMES--ENCOURAGES PLAYERS TO LEARN ABOUT TYPE BY EXPLORING A WORLD OF FONTS, MARIO-STYLE.”
FAST COMPANY

About the Game

The European cultural TV channel Arte innovates and launches its first video game !
Immerse yourself in this fascinating and unique experience to uncover the history and secrets of Fonts & Characters !

Play as 2 dots and travel through the ages of typographic styles and techniques.
From the rock paintings of prehistoric times to Pixel art of the 2000’s, solve all the riddles by riding the most popular fonts and characters (Garamond, Helvetica, Times New Roman, Pixel, Comic Sans...) in a very captivating musical and visual environment.

Type:Rider is an adventure puzzle game produced by AGAT – EX NIHILO and ARTE that brings gaming experience to a whole new daring level.

Key Features:

  • 10 worlds echoing key periods of the typograhy’s history
  • Breath-taking artworks and musical vibes
  • Immersive and intriguing atmosphere
  • Great historical archives and paintings

PC System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP
    • Processor: Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D accelerated
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible SB16
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: Core i5
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D accelerated
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible SB16

Mac System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: OSX 10.6
    • Processor: Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D accelerated
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible SB16
    Recommended:
    • OS: OSX 10.8
    • Processor: Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D accelerated
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible SB16

Linux System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu
    • Processor: Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D accelerated
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible SB16
    Recommended:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04.3
    • Processor: Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D accelerated
    • Hard Drive: 500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible SB16
Helpful customer reviews
32 of 40 people (80%) found this review helpful
880 products in account
140 reviews
4.0 hrs on record
It's easy to take fonts for granted. After all, hundreds of them come preloaded in even the simplest word processors, allowing for uninhibited freedom for formatting whatever we might need. But what most probably forget, is that it didn't use to be like this; those fonts came from somewhere, each a painstaking creation designed with a specific use in mind, which have nonetheless endured for generations and are now being put to use for far different purposes.

In many ways Type:Rider acts as a sort of mini history lesson to the legacy of fonts, a subject far more interesting in execution than on paper. From the earliest known texts to modern computer code, it's surprisingly fascinating to see the evolution of printed text and how various fonts came into being. There's a special place in my heart for games that can be both entertaining and educational, and this is certainly among the best I've played to date.

If you're shaking your head thinking there's nothing you'd rather not do than read over history descriptions while playing a game, it's worth noting that it's entirely optional to do so. It's never in your faced or forced upon you, but if you are planning to dismiss this side of the experience you'll be left with an otherwise rather bland and clumsy platformer. I was able to look past many of the weaker aspects of the game because I found the artistic and academic elements to be interesting in themselves, but those looking for even an average platformer are likely to come away disappointed.

This falls solely on the controls, a terribly clunky lesson in frustration as you attempt to maneuver a character that seems to like nothing more than to flip wildly out of control at the worst moments. Most levels make up for this by being relatively simple to traverse, but on a handful of occasion more precision is required which proves truly aggravating. The secret level being the most difficult and featuring no checkpoints only adds insult to injury, making me wonder why the developers chose to add such a challenging segment to a game that seems designed to be a relaxing an accessible experience.

Type:Rider is far from a perfect game, maybe not even a good one, but it is a unique and interesting endeavor to give a little background on a subject I'd never have bothered to look into otherwise. For those who can appreciate it more as an art piece than a traditional platformer, it's an intriguing slice of edutainment the strength of which lies in its excellent aesthetic and nontraditional source material, and not its gameplay. Anyone already bored reading this review should go ahead and pass on it, as there are dozens of other games that will be a far better fit for what you're after.

If nothing else, I doubt you'll ever look at comic sans quite the same way again.
Posted: March 25th, 2014
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21 of 26 people (81%) found this review helpful
1,193 products in account
15 reviews
4.3 hrs on record
Type:Rider is a puzzle platform game designed more of an educational experience to introduce you the history of typography than to provide a thrilling and testing game experience. As the aforementioned educational experience it's really interesting, purely as a game it can be frustrating.

You control two balls, a colon(?), inexorably linked across 10 levels, one intro, 1 hidden and 8 main ones representing the various ages of typography each with a font theme appropriate to the era. From Gothic to Time, Helvetica to Pixel, each level has it's own unique idenity and all are very different, thankfully never feeling grindy.

On each level the goal to collect the entire typeface, A through Z, 6 or so asterisks' and a hidden ampersand. Apart from the sort of hidden ampersand, you really won't have to go out of you way to collect anything. None of the levels are difficult, you are meant to experience this game, not be challenged by it and with the fine ambient music, levels are a joy. Each main level is split into 4 parts, two collectable platforming sections and 2 puzzle areas. These puzzle areas range from Arkanoid and Peggle clones to shifting a third ball around through typeface to open a door, all doors requiring a third ball, key, to open.

As a game it is let down by frustrating controls, the wall jumping doesn't quite work right. Jumping is also an inexact science and once you get to the final level there are sections that really deserve better controls. This game isn't Super Meat Boy, but a little more time was needed to finesse the gaming.

It's definitely worth your time, a couple of hours, at a decent price, but I can't help the feeling that if they had made the control and physics more predictable, it would have made a better game.
Posted: April 8th, 2014
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9 of 10 people (90%) found this review helpful
2,034 products in account
765 reviews
3.5 hrs on record
Type: Rider is a short, 1,5-2 hour platformer about the existence of fonts, Or something like that.
You play as 2 balls (no, not those kind of balls ;)) and you have to navigate through levels by rolling and jumping around, ocassionally solving simple, physics related puzzles.

There are 10 levels in total and every level has an entire alphabet for you to collect, in addition to some history pages, which can be found by collecting asterix symbols (*), or secrets, which can be found by collecting the ampersands (&).

Near the end of the game some of the gameplay becomes a bit annoying because the physics don't exactly react the way you want them to, resulting in many accidental deaths. Especially the bonus level (which is one of the shortest levels) had me in rage mode. It's by far the worst level in the entire game, but thankfully it's entirely optional.

All in all Type: Rider isn't that bad. And because it's a short experience it's a game anyone can try and finish.

[Rating: 70/100]
Posted: April 21st, 2014
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10 of 12 people (83%) found this review helpful
550 products in account
414 reviews
2.4 hrs on record
I'm not convinced that this game is very good as an educational game on a PC. It's beautiful and I like the concept, and I am glad art studios are taking stabs at making games like this, but it takes the gameplay of Trials (which is about doing crazy stunts to torture the little ragdoll man on the motorcycle) and forces it into a stuffy, educational atmosphere, making it wear a suit and tie and forcing it to choose the correct spoon for its soup. Here are two dots! Please guide them on this linear, slightly bumpy path. Oh no, the dots are stuck! How will we ever teach you about fonts if you can't get the dots to get unstuck?

Your reward for picking up the collectibles is a few paragraphs of text, and I can sense the enthusiasm and wisdom on this subject being brought through. However, it made me feel guilty - so much so that I get the feeling that I should be watching a documentary or reading about this instead of getting these stupid ♥♥♥♥ing dots to match up with the exit pegs properly.

It's a beautiful game - but the developers haven't bothered to fix the issue where changing into the maximum resolution is impossible. I had the horrible misfortune of clicking on a resolution option other than glorious 1920x1080, and I was forced to play in ♥♥♥♥ing miserable 1440x900 with no way to go back. (The utter slime on the Steam forums suggests that you use RegEdit, but this is a game that was released in 2013 and not a lost classic from the Windows 95 era. No thank you.)

Play it on a tablet instead. Better yet, watch a documentary on fonts like the dweeb that you are. Dweeeeeb.
Posted: April 23rd, 2014
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10 of 12 people (83%) found this review helpful
359 products in account
25 reviews
3.0 hrs on record
Very frustrating to play on the pc without touchscreen. The game is meant to be played with touchscreen. I can't give it a recommendation for the general PC version on steam because of the clunky controls. The concept is nice, the art work is amazing but if you want to truly enjoy this game play it on your touchscreen compatible pad or phone.
Posted: May 25th, 2014
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64 of 82 people (78%) found this review helpful
558 products in account
21 reviews
12.1 hrs on record
First off: This is meant to be an educational experience, if you don't like 'games' like this move on and don't read further.

The levels are composed of letters of whichever font you're playing, and they look gorgeous.
Everything is simple, yet aesthetic. The music fits, spot on. I was surprised on how everything works so well together. Each world has their own theme that reflects the font (and the era it's from). For someone like me, who didn't really know anything about font history, Type:Rider was truly informative. It never seemed boring and always kept my interest.
The only downside I can think of, is that sometimes the physics seem a bit off. Otherwise well worth a buy, defenitely while it's on sale.

Posted: December 2nd, 2013
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Awards

European Indie Game Days 2013: The Price of Artistic Consistency