The horns sound, the ravens gather. An empire is torn by civil war. Beyond its borders, new kingdoms rise. Gird on your sword, don your armour, summon your followers and ride forth to win glory on the battlefields of Calradia. Establish your hegemony and create a new world out of the ashes of the old.
All Reviews:
No user reviews
Release Date:
To Be Announced

Sign in to add this item to your wishlist, follow it, or mark it as not interested

Available: To Be Announced

 

Recent updates View all (72)

November 8

Dev Blog 08/11/18



Greetings warriors of Calradia!

In the medieval ages, castles and strongholds were not meant to be dwellings, but military tools that were strong and easy to defend, positioned in choke points to protect an important region or trade route. Villages, on the other hand, were the population centres - places where people would dwell and sleep after a long day of work in the fields or herding their cattle. Towns were somewhat a combination of the two, but they were also very different (and complex) places. They had walls for defence and a high population count, but they were much more than just dwellings and defensive structures: they were the most important places around. Towns are where kingdoms forged their real power. Artisans worked raw materials into quality goods and merchants turned them into wealth. Courts were established in towns, so they were also the heart and brains of any realm -- where politics, conspiracies, and plots took place.



In Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord, towns are very much like their real-world counterparts. They are where industrial goods are produced, higher quality troops are trained, commerce flourishes, notable NPCs do their dealings and crime is prevalent. And this is exactly what our level designers try to reflect as they create each town scene.

In a previous blog, we looked at how we approach map design for castles, which share some similarities with towns (both have upgradable walls and both can be besieged). However, when it comes to design, towns are a completely different beast.



As we design the layout of each town, we tend to divide them into recognisable districts, so that players can develop an instinct for where they can find what they are looking for. This isn’t so much a rule that is set in stone, as we want to stay fluid in our approach to level design, but all of our work on these scenes share similar design principles.
  • Marketplace - This is where most goods are traded. If you are looking for a shiny new helmet, supplies for a campaign, or perhaps some barding for your horse, then the marketplace will be your first port of call. The marketplace is also where you will find the local blacksmith, where you can design and craft your own melee weapons.
  • Slums and backstreet - Dangerous places where smugglers and bandits gather to make money by illegitimate means, diminishing the resources and taxes of the town.
  • Keep - Where you can find the nobles and governor of the town (as well as the prisoners!). One day, this is somewhere that you will hopefully get to call home.
  • Military district - This is where the town guards and garrison gather, and where troops can be trained. Also, this is where the town’s stockpile is located to be used in times of need (such as a defensive siege).
  • Tavern - This is where adventurers and drunks alike gather to share stories over a mug of mead. Some revellers are just a nuisance, others are sellswords that will fight for the right amount of money, and a rare few are companions that will follow you in your ambitions and help you to achieve your goals.



Gameplay
We understand that no matter how nice and immersive we make our towns look, walking around them creates downtime from your conquering and pillaging. For those of you who would like to rest between your various exploits, we have many small details to explore and discover in our towns. However, for those who are in a hurry, we group interactable NPCs together according to their roles for ease of access for players. And for those of you that don’t want to set a single foot in a town, we have the settlement menu, where you can access practically every function available in towns directly from the campaign map (barring a select few that we save for immersion).



Sieges also play a big part in the design of a town scene. This comes both with technical and gameplay limitations, but also with opportunities! Small roads and buildings around town gates add variety to gameplay when the town is under siege, however, a shop that is filled to the brim with many intricate pieces of pottery would add performance complications. Our solution is to have a "siege state" for our scenes (which is easily achievable with our map editor). When a player deploys into a town that is under siege, they are greeted by deserted streets. The marketplace closes down, taking all of the colourful and fine goods with it, shops bar their doors and barricades are raised in the streets to help with defences.



This method not only helps us create immersion and ease the load on performance by removing elements that are unnecessary for a combat scene, but it also gives us more flexibility with our design. We can barricade off roads that are not related to siege gameplay to reduce overcomplexity or close shortcuts that might give an unnecessary advantage to either side while creating new choke points that would look out of place when there is no conflict.

Overall, we try to design our town scenes to be believable and immersive, but also to compliment gameplay. We want players to be easily able to navigate the world, either through their player character or through UI elements (such as menus), and experience the sandbox in the way that they want to.



In next week’s blog, we will talk to Animator and Motion Capture Artist, Abdullah Nakipoğlu. If you have any questions you would like to ask him, please leave a reply in the comments section and we will pick one out for him to answer!

Discuss this blog post HERE



Facebook
Twitter


Website
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Twitch
312 comments Read more

November 1

Dev Blog 01/11/18



Greetings warriors of Calradia!

3D artists give shape to the world we see and experience in a video game. But the devil is in the details, and sometimes what makes a game live and breathe are the small things: not the main characters and impressive buildings, but day-to-day objects such as tools, weapons, and clothes. Gameplay can be as immersive as can be to make you feel like a medieval warrior, but if you’re clothed in sweatpants and the world around you is made of cardboard, immersion jumps out of the window. Today, we talk with one of our 3D artists, Ülker Dikmen, who is one of the people responsible for making Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord not just beautiful, but also a believable world.


NAME
Ülker Dikmen

FROM
Ankara, Turkey

JOINED TALEWORLDS
2012

EDUCATION
Psychology, Hacettepe University

OFFICIAL JOB DESCRIPTION
3D Character Artist


WHAT DO YOU NORMALLY DO DURING YOUR DAY?
When I first started working at TaleWorlds back at the beginning of 2012, my job was to create a default character head and its morphs to allow players customise their characters in the character screen. Later, I started modelling hair and clothes and other character parts.

Nowadays, I mostly make clothes (especially for the women of Calradia!). Before I start a new costume, my team leader Özgür and I discuss what kind of an outfit is needed and then I roll my sleeves up for the serious business of making medieval fashion pieces! I start off in Marvelous Designer, where I draw sewing patterns and turn them into realistic-looking clothes. Then I move to ZBrush, where I add details like laces and stitches. After I complete the low poly version of the dress in TopoGun, the task of skinning and vertex painting for the cloth simulation begins. Once it's all done I import the costume into the game and check if everything works well.





WHAT DO YOU LIKE THE MOST ABOUT BANNERLORD?
I think it's not surprising that as an artist I like the beautiful graphics of the game the most. My favourite part though would have to be the character screen, where I could spend hours making my perfect character. I also enjoy walking in the beautiful villages and cities and hanging out in the tavern where I can enjoy medieval music.

WHAT'S THE MOST DIFFICULT THING THAT YOU SOLVED SO FAR, DURING THE PRODUCTION OF BANNERLORD?
The most challenging task so far was to make the clothes look good, both when the cloth simulation is on and off. When the cloth simulation is on, I have to make sure the clothes are baggy enough to make room for the movements of the character. For instance, if the dresses are not baggy enough or have slits here and there, some body parts will show through the clothes. On the other hand, the clothes will look blocky if too baggy when the cloth simulation is off. So it's a difficult task to find a happy medium.



WHAT DO YOU CURRENTLY WORK ON?
I’m editing my old costume meshes so that they work nicely with the cloth simulation (at the time I made those meshes we didn’t have cloth simulation so they need a bit of editing now).

WHAT FACTION DO YOU LIKE THE MOST IN BANNERLORD?
Battania! Mostly because I love their shabby clothes and the dark and misty atmosphere of their settlements. Also, because blanket in Turkish is "battaniye", which evokes a cosy feeling!



CAN YOU GIVE US SOME DETAILS ABOUT THE CHARACTER CREATOR? HOW MUCH CONTROL AND CREATIVE FREEDOM DO WE HAVE? (FOR EXAMPLE, CAN WE CHANGE THE HEIGHT AND WEIGHT OF OUR CHARACTER?)
The character creator gives the player absolute control over how their character will look. We have body type sliders to set the weight, build and height of the character. There are lots of skin, eye and hair colour options, and of course, lots and lots of face morphs to let you create your perfect character.

WHAT IS THE MOST ENJOYABLE/EXCITING ASSET YOU HAVE WORKED ON? WHICH ASSET DID YOU HAVE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF FUN CREATING?
I love making tattered and dirty clothes because I enjoy experiencing a depressingly dull and bleak atmosphere in games. Creating assets like this really excites me and makes my imagination run wild. Creating the character hair was my least favourite task because it’s very difficult and time-consuming to make a hair mesh look natural and beautiful.

WHERE DO YOU DRAW YOUR INSPIRATION FROM?
I draw much of my inspiration from medieval TV shows and movies. We also have a large collection of medieval history books here at TaleWorlds which I check out when I lack inspiration.

Discuss this blog post HERE



Facebook
Twitter


Website
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Twitch
420 comments Read more

About This Game

The horns sound, the ravens gather. An empire is torn by civil war. Beyond its borders, new kingdoms rise. Gird on your sword, don your armour, summon your followers and ride forth to win glory on the battlefields of Calradia. Establish your hegemony and create a new world out of the ashes of the old.

Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord is the eagerly awaited sequel to the acclaimed medieval combat simulator and role-playing game Mount & Blade: Warband. Set 200 years before, it expands both the detailed fighting system and the world of Calradia. Bombard mountain fastnesses with siege engines, establish secret criminal empires in the back alleys of cities, or charge into the thick of chaotic battles in your quest for power.

SIEGE GAMEPLAY
Construct, position and fire a range of heavy machinery in sieges that will test your wits and skill like never before. Experience epic, sprawling combat across ramparts and rubble as you desperately hold on to your castle or seek to seize one from the enemy.

Historically authentic defensive structures offer the ultimate medieval warfare experience, as you batter a rival's gate with your ram or burn his siege tower to ashes. Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord lets you live every moment of a chaotic battle through the eyes of a single soldier.

DIPLOMACY
Engage in diplomacy, with meaningful consequences that impact the world. Strike historic peace deals that win land for your kingdom or free you to take on a new foe. An all-new barter system gives players flexibility in cementing deals, from marriage offers to treason pacts, offering all the options available to NPCs. Use a new influence system to direct your faction's energies or strangle the aspirations of a rival.

SANDBOX ECONOMY
See the availability of goods ebb and flow in a simulated feudal economy, where the price of everything from incense to warhorses fluctuates with supply and demand. Invest in farms and workshops, or turn anarchy to your advantage by being the first to bring grain to a starving town after a siege or reopening a bandit-plagued caravan route.

CRAFTING
Craft your own weapon, name it and carry it with you to the field of battle! A deep, physics-based system gives each weapon you create a unique set of attributes, strengths and weaknesses. Forge a finely-tuned killing machine to match your own prowess and complement your play-style, or take the sword of your enemy and brandish it as a trophy of war.

MODDING
The engine and tools used to develop Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord are being made available to the community, so that modders can re-interpret Calradia or create their own worlds! Players can now combine different mods, making it easier than ever to play the game of your dreams.

ENGINE
An all-new tailor-made game engine, developed in-house to fulfill the unique needs of the series, offers the perfect balance of performance and graphical fidelity, scalable with the power of your hardware.

Experience Mount & Blade with richer, more beautiful graphics than ever, immersing you in the world of Calradia, rendering the game's magnificent battles with equally spectacular detail.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • Processor: Intel i3-2100 / AMD FX-6300
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel HD 4600 / Nvidia GT730 / AMD R7 240
    • Storage: 40 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: These estimates may change during final release

What Curators Say

59 Curators have reviewed this product. Click here to see them.
There are no reviews for this product

You can write your own review for this product to share your experience with the community. Use the area above the purchase buttons on this page to write your review.