Featured Items
Games
Software Demos Recommended NEWS
This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs. From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.
Release Date: Sep 10, 2013

Buy Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs

$19.99

Packages that include this game

Buy Amnesia Collection

Includes 2 items: Amnesia: The Dark Descent, Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs

About the Game

This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs.

From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.

The year is 1899

Wealthy industrialist Oswald Mandus awakes in his bed, wracked with fever and haunted by dreams of a dark and hellish engine. Tortured by visions of a disastrous expedition to Mexico, broken on the failing dreams of an industrial utopia, wracked with guilt and tropical disease, he wakes into a nightmare. The house is silent, the ground beneath him shaking at the will of some infernal machine: all he knows is that his children are in grave peril, and it is up to him to save them.

Unique Selling Points

  • Fresh and new approach to the Amnesia world while staying true to its origins.
  • The darkest, most horrific tale ever told in a videogame.
  • Stunning soundtrack by award-winning composer Jessica Curry.

PC System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space

Mac System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.6.8
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X 10.7.5
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space

Linux System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2010.
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2012
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
239 of 328 people (73%) found this review helpful
180 products in account
7 reviews
4.6 hrs on record
I really don't think this game should be called "Amnesia" as it doesn't really have anything in common with the first game, except some loose distant connection through story. If you are looking for a survival horror game, there isn't really any "survival" or not even that much "horror" or "game" in this one. The first 90 minutes of this game are frightning as heck, but once you have encountered a few enemies and discovered that they aren't really much of a threat at all, the scary part is over. No feeling of being hunted, no brilliant AI, no mazes, no proper puzzles, no physics or interactivity etc, just a linear path.

However, having cleared that out of the way I'm still giving this one thumbs up. Amnesia 2 is about the atmosphere and sense of mystery. Players expecting a challenge or interesting game mechanics are going to be deeply disappointed, but those seeking a good twisted story will get some moderately creepy and disturbing experience. This story has so many levels that it would require an entire book or something to go through all the possible theories. Some claim that despite the effort put into the writing, the plot isn't really that great or sophisticated either, but although it does has some problems, I think it does at least occasionally succeed. From story or atmosphere viewpoint Amnesia 2 is still an average game and if that's your thing, I recommend it.

- 4 hours put into the game, 8 hours put into arguing (speculating) about what the story of Machine for Pigs is about
Posted: November 28th, 2013
Was this review helpful? Yes No
612 of 883 people (69%) found this review helpful
446 products in account
103 reviews
6.7 hrs on record
I find this game very disappointing. Many of the interesting and intuitive gameplay elements from the previous game have been forcefully stripped away, and only the bare bones of gameplay mechanics exist.

It doesn't even come close to The Dark Descent. I don't want to say this game is downright horrible, but it's not very good either. You get some good scares and interesting moments sprinkled in, but apart from that, it's a pretty dull game with a sloppy, rushed plot.
Posted: November 28th, 2013
Was this review helpful? Yes No
405 of 615 people (66%) found this review helpful
534 products in account
8 reviews
4.5 hrs on record
Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is a dumbed down version of Amnesia: The Dark Descent (which was a dumbed down version of the Penumbra games itself).
TDD was still a good game and some of its changes were improvements over Penumbra (less clunky controls to name just one).
The same CAN NOT be said about AMfP: The developers managed to remove everything from the game that made its predecessors fun without adding anything new in return, leaving behind only an empty husk of a game.
There is no exploration in AMfP because it's extremely linear with virtually no alternative routes whatsoever.
The hand lamp burns on forever and the inventory has been removed completely, so there's no resource management throughout the game either.
The very few puzzles in the game are barely worth that name; they are almost insultingly easy and rarely more than using a picked up item at the end of linear corridor #134.
On top of the game's linearity the monster encounters are, for the most part, heavily scripted and mostly consist of monsters moving in the shadows far away from the player - there are less than a handful ares in the game with free-roaming enemies where the player can actually get hurt.

The following paragraph is about game mechanics, not AMfP's story. It can still potentially spoil the game's beginning to some degree, I guess. Therefore I put it in spoiler tags; you might want to skip it if you're planning to play the game sometime.


Monster encounters are not only rare, the lamp also begins to flicker everytime a monster is near - usually long before it can even be seen. After noticing this the game entirely lost the little tension it had to begin with for me: I always knew when a monster would appear beforehand, when they appeared they rarely posed a danger because of their scripted nature and for whatever reason the effects directly looking at a monster had in Penumbra and TDD are gone as well (or at least toned done a lot), so the horrors that were quiet effectively left to the player's imagination in the predecessors are now shown directly, thus making the game less scary in the end.


So, to sum it up: there is not much actual gameplay in Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, it is hardly a game at all.
That doesn't necessarily has to be a bad thing. The same thing can probably be said about Telltale's The Walking Dead, but TWD makes up its lack of gameplay with a very well told story.
However AMfP isn't very good storywise either: It's full of horror-pulp stereotypes, making it very predictable, and towards the end the story gets completely lost in a pile of pretentious symbolism.

Not much is missed by skipping AMfP completely. If you liked TDD and haven't played the Penumbra games, better go for them instead - they are a lot better than this new game.
Also note that AMfP was not developed by Frictional Games (who made Penumbra and TDD) but by The Chinese Room who apparently moved towards making console games by now (figures). So waiting for Frictional's game SOMA, which is currently in devolpment, could still be worthwile if it turns out closer to the games they made themselves.
Posted: November 25th, 2013
Was this review helpful? Yes No
266 of 428 people (62%) found this review helpful
689 products in account
52 reviews
4.9 hrs on record
A horror without horror. Despite this terrible contradiction, A Machine for Pigs loses nothing by getting rid of its main feature. Even being much closer to an interactive novel rather than to a horror game, it's almost as tense as before - all thanks to the cunning narration and that great setting it uses.
Although it's a bit frustrating that the game has lost a great part of its interactivity, leaving all the credits to the plot. The player is here to pull some triggers and watch the story, not to be an actual part of it. Not a big deal, but still.
So, Amnesia's choice now is to become a story-driven thriller. If it seems to be fine with you, there's nothing else to complain about. In other cases, it would be better to take a closer look at Outlast.
Posted: November 26th, 2013
Was this review helpful? Yes No
24 of 24 people (100%) found this review helpful
1,125 products in account
63 reviews
6.4 hrs on record
Personal Rating: "Worth Playing"
Traditional Rating: 7.5/10
Platform: PC
Genre: Horror

Frictional Games may have not had a hand in developing Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs only simply publishing it with development reigns for this iteration having been handed to Dear Esther development house, The Chinese Room. However, that in no way lessens the experience for the gamer or sullies the franchise as is often the case when outside development houses take over in subsequent sequels. In fact by the time the end credits roll on A Machine for Pigs, The Chinese Room have taken you to a far more menacing and darker psychological place than the original Amnesia could have ever have dreamt up.

My main gripe with the original Amnesia was that, whilst utterly terrifying in its first half, its second half was plodded and padded out with puzzles there simply to exist to lengthen the adventure. When it all began to fall back on the familiar supernatural tropes so often trotted out in horror I was left slightly disappointed. The Chinese Room seem to have understood this perfectly, especially when it comes to horror. By toning down the puzzles (there is no inventory to speak of) you end up not being taken out of the horror every five minutes to solve some mind-bending puzzle as was the case in the first one. By removing the need for oil and the sanity meter they have streamlined the experience further which in the end allows the story to move to the forefront and my-oh-my what a story it is. The Chinese Room also understand perfectly that horror and tension of this sort can only be sustained for short periods. This was my gripe with both the first Amnesia and Outlast in that they should have been shorter in order to sustain the terror they were trying to convey. Brevity is the golden rule in my books when it comes to horror and any horror game outstaying its welcome in length ends up being a diminished experience. A Machine for Pigs comes in at a pert 4-6 hrs (depending on how you play) and that is the perfect length in my books for a horror title.

A Machine for Pigs is set at the end of the Industrial Era (which the game evokes beautifully) and sees you take control of Oswald Mandus awaking to a terrifying personal nightmare. Emerging from a hellish fever dream that involves some kind of infernal industrial machine, he soon realizes that both of his children are missing. Once again, like the first, notes lay sprewn about the game world that give us insight into his back story. Oswald, you see, is the proud owner of a meat processing factory but as the tale descends into its serpentine labyrinth of terror you soon realize that this is a factory where very little governance seems to have been applied when it comes to the kind of meat being processed for consumption.

Whilst slow going to begin with - the second half of the game really literally picks up and moves at a cracking pace which never seems to let up for one single second as it hurtles towards its grim ending. I was initially a bit disappointed with it but as time marched on I found myself more and more invested in this tale of horror than I was with the initial Amnesia. At the end of it all, all I can say was that I was suitably impressed with this title and if The Chinese Room is drafted in at some stage to make another I can't say I will be disappointed.

If you enjoy horror there is no reason you should not enjoy this. Remember this is a more darker, complex (in terms of the tale its trying to tell) and sinister game experience than the first one and if you go in not expecting a rehash of the first game you are bound to be in for a pleasantly spooky surprise.
Posted: April 22nd, 2014
Was this review helpful? Yes No