WE KNOW THE DEVIL is a visual novel about teens reluctantly fighting the devil at summer camp. Follow meangirl Neptune, tomboy Jupiter, and shy shy Venus as they get to know each other--but one always gets left out.
User reviews:
Overall:
Very Positive (120 reviews) - 91% of the 120 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Feb 15, 2016

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Reviews

“If We Know the Devil is trying to say anything, it's that you deserve to love yourself. There’s nothing wrong with you.”
Giant Bomb

“Remember your adolescent summers, and the strangely-intense interrelationships and betrayals of that age? The things that happened among all of you without you ever really understanding: That felt like devilry, didn't it?”
Offworld

About This Game

Anyone can kill the devil; that’s why they always make teens the vampire slayers, the magical girls. But some kids can’t even get that right; and that’s why meangirl Neptune, tomboy Jupiter, and shy shy Venus have to endure one more week of summer camp and each other, singing boring songs about jesus, doing busywork for adults, and hoping god’s radio can’t hear them.

Before they can leave the summer scouts, they’ve got to spend twelve hours in the loneliest cabin in the woods and wait for the devil to come and live through the night--or not. You know.

A Surreal Summer Camp Dystopia

WE KNOW THE DEVIL is a Group Relationship Horror Visual novel created by weirdo games critic and indefensible twitter account haver Aevee Bee (Mammon Machine:ZEAL) and illustrator and comics artist Mia Schwartz, with a chilling 80s horror synth soundtrack by Alec Lambert (Antibody Productions), live photo backgrounds taken with disposable cameras in the terrifying woods where we live, and aesthetic touches and UI by Lulu Blue.

WE KNOW THE DEVIL is a story about everyone who made you cry at summer camp. It’s about missing your Sailor Moon VHS tapes. It’s about how being irresponsible is contagious. It’s about knowing that in a group of three, two of you will be closer than the other.

And it’s about being weird and queer and wrong and hoping against hope no one will find out when the actual, literal devil comes for you.

Pick Your One True Pairing

WE KNOW THE DEVIL truly has no one protagonist; but someone will always be left out. It’s up to you to decide who that is. Instead of choosing a partner, you follow pairs of characters as they learn about themselves and wait for the devil to appear.

Will Venus and Neptune stop hating themselves long enough to be friends? Will Jupiter finally tell Neptune what’s been on her mind? Will Venus and Jupiter make it to morning as the only good kids left alive?

Hopefully it turns out the way you want it to. Don’t forget: the price the two pay will be the third.

Features

  • Three endings for all possible OTPs, and a horrifying bonus true end!
  • Washed out, overexposed background photos taken on disposable camera for that nineties summer feeling
  • A chilling 80s horror synth soundtrack by Alec Lambert

Content Advisory

Themes of isolation and alienation of queer youth in a religious rural setting. Abstract, psychological horror, and possibly alarming music.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: 2+ Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel 3000HD or greater
    • Sound Card: Optional, but recommended
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.8
    • Processor: 2+ Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel 3000HD or greater
    • Sound Card: Optional, but recommended
Customer reviews
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Overall:
Very Positive (120 reviews)
Recently Posted
Alpakka
2.4 hrs on record
Posted: August 21
"It must have been the devil's work."

Short but sweet visual novel, just be sure to get all the endings.

Soundtrack slightly reminds of Sunn O))), although not quite as disturbing.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
sui89
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: August 21
Most of the reviews for this game are longer than the game itself. 38 minutes is pretty terrible for length. Worse than that, I felt very unconcerned about the characters, mainly because the backdrop of this story is never very clearly explained. For the whole story, I was waiting for something important to happen, and it just kind of never does. Talking occurs, but nothing substantial goes down. Each scene, talking place in hour increments of in game time, does not in any logical way connect to the next one. As a result, the whole narrative is extremely clunky and confusing. I read the summaries for what this game is supposed to be about with all the metaphors, and I have to say, do yourself a favor and just read the summaries. The game's presentation is just awful. I love visual novels and games where choices matter, but I just could not get into this one.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
manwhat
2.4 hrs on record
Posted: August 16
A short visual novel well worth the price.
WKTD is focused on only three characters, taking place over the course of a single night at a summer camp in an alternate universe of strange radios and being a scout (in the 'sailor scout' sense) in training.
Gameplay consists of choosing which character to 'exclude' at any one time, having the other two bond. At the end of the night, you meet a devil.

The soundtrack is possibly the greatest part - weird electronica tones that make it feel like an 80s teen horror movie.

Strongly recommended that after getting a single ending, you go for all the other endings - or at least for the 'complete' ending.

Signing off with a quote from the Steam discussion forums on this game:
"This game does not have ♥♥♥♥♥, but it does have FEELS and GAY (which is BETTER)"
Helpful? Yes No Funny
trans heavy
1.8 hrs on record
Posted: August 13
I'm very in love with this game
Helpful? Yes No Funny
EverettDisaster
3.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 10
To start off I'd like to say that this was definetly a wonderful visual novel, however there are some things that I have to point out. My first playthrough was moderately confusing because the amount of metaphors and hidden meanings within the game. To add onto that, it's practically impossible to figure out the meanings on your own. Once you play through (try for the red or yellow ending first) I'd recommend looking up a synopsis or reading through discussions on here to really piece the story together. Without finding the true meaning you'll be left after your first playthrough saying 'what the ♥♥♥♥ did I just play' and I doubt you'll be impressed. With that being said, once I found out the true meanings to this story I grew much fonder of the game and thoroughly enjoyed my second playthrough.

Secondly, it seems as though everyone adored the music in this game except me. I found it really unenjoyable and rather it sounds much more like plain noise than music. Slightly unbearable, but I'm getting used to it. Update: Idek how but my opinion on the music has done a 180. Hail Satan and Alec Lambert.

On the bright side, I grew very fond of the characters, one in particular I LOVE YOU VENUS Loved the visuals with the way the characters were drawn and the over-exposed camera shots for backround. Gave it a 90s feel. Overall, I recommend you purchase the game because deep within it are three beautiful stories of self acceptance that I will not forget. 4/5. Wish it had trading cards

For those of you who were confused let me try and sum it up here. The story is driven by the idea of the Devil. The Devil represents self-acceptance and how the world tries to repress people (in this game specifically LBGT+) Each character has something that the world has deemed unacceptable. For Jupiter, is that she is a lesbian. For Venus, is that she is a transgender. Neptune has been labeled a ♥♥♥♥ and I also assume she is bi. The setting of a Christian summer camp also really drives home the idea of having to conform to the world's standards. With the ending of each story, one of the characters is taken over by the devil, allowing them to accept themself. Another metaphor within the game is the radios. They represent communication and the ability communication has to overcome repression. The only character whose story is a little off the beaten path is Neptune. She herself long ago accepted the bad within her and at the end of her story tries to force the other two into realizing they're bad and accepting themselves.

The second meaning within the game is how in a group of three, two will always be closer. Also within the character's age group, usual friendship business usually feels like devilry. Especially at summer camp.


Pretty breif confusion summary, I recommend looking more into it.

HAIL SATAN Story will leave you a sad, gay, polyamourous, mess
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ThreeLeggedFeline
1.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 9
I loved the style of this game - both in terms of art and the writing. The two work well together, with the art complimenting the writing instead of propping it up. The writing is very good; it's poetic, well-structured and concise. The characters are interesting, and their inner workings are explored skillfully. The subtle defamiliarisation of the world was intriguing, and it really added to the eerie tone. I love that things aren't just spoonfed to the reader and there was actually stuff for me to sink my teeth into.
It's short, but I can forgive it for that on account of the good writing, though the price still feels a little high. Buy it on sale.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Shikigaymi
1.5 hrs on record
Posted: August 4
Oh my god. Okay, now, first off, let me iterate: I have played a lot of visual novels, and yes, they have all been gay visual novels, except for Sonic's Inflation Adventure, which I may have only played in a dream.
This is probably the best visual novel / interactive story type thing I have ever played. The only ones rivalling it are the Analogue/Hate series, which is only KIND of a visual novel, and I'm not even sure if it counts.

Okay... It's almost 3 AM, so I'm organizing this really weirdly. There's elements, y'see, Story, Characters, and Gameplay.

The story is ♥♥♥♥ing great. Obviously, there were outcomes I didn't really like, but I wasn't supposed to like them, so they worked out perfectly. The TRUE ending is my absolute favorite, but all endings were very entertaining. Hellish, but in the best way possible.

The characters were pretty great too. I definitely saw real people in each of the three main characters (and saw the characters in real people). Of course, I wish some aspects of their lives were clearer and more drawn-out, but the game is vague on purpose and often avoids going into character or background details for the sake of the story. Which is fine. The reason I desire more details about the characters is because I like them so much, not because they're lacking.

Gameplay-wise, well, it's a ♥♥♥♥ing visual novel. My only gripe is that the true ending is a little annoying to get, but that's all true endings, so it's a useless gripe. There are other aspects of gameplay though, like, visuals, audio, that sort of thing. I really like the visuals. "♥♥♥♥♥♥ trash summer camp" was captured perfectly, and the quality of each image imbues just that bit of eerieness when you need it. I liked the music a lot, so much so that I wish there was more of it! But I happen to enjoy weird lo-fi + electronic crap so I don't know how it holds up with other people.

Okay, and then, themes. Obviously, disillusionment (or just plain dissatisfaction) with Christianity is a huge thing here. A little off for me, because I wasn't raised with it, but I happen to really enjoy unorthodox interpretations of witchcraft and the devil and so forth, so it really resonated with me. Probably one of the biggest themes is isolation, or being unable (or unwilling) to "fit in," and the game handles this extraordinarily well. And there's the queer part of it, which is pretty clear and makes it all the better since it's a game by queer artists, for queer people. Plus, what better way to be isolated than to be queer? It all sort of goes together; it wouldn't make sense for these characters to be so isolated in a camp full of their peers in terms of age and background and NOT be queer.

I can barely stay awake and it's becoming even more evident, so I'll wrap this up: It's a great game, even for people who aren't into visual novels. If you're not queer or obsessed with the devil, it probably won't resonate as much with you, but you could very easily still enjoy it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
rivercinnamonstyx
1.6 hrs on record
Posted: July 22
Visual novels tend to be gameplay lite and story heavy, and as such they can't effectively be reviewed like other video games. Their DNA isn't that of adventure games, role playing games, or platformers, but of anime and choose your own adventures, generally. They have the most in common with the Japanese "light novel", text and image and accessibility, only the sound design and choice mechanics really differentiating it. As of late, the concept of the visual novel has traveled westward, and we've been seeing games developed in house or via ren'py from all sorts of developers. It's a good way to tell a story, as traditional reading mediums have seen a decline in social relevance and economical presence, it is very cheap to produce and find a market for, and more traditional games or even mediums like comics or film are more expensive to produce, more time consuming. This gameplay lite/story heavy approach allows for people with a story to tell to do so succintly and easily, and it's nice to see the medium developing well in non-Japanese contexts.

This ties very well into LGBT+ approaches to art and entertainment. Considering the niche market and long time corporate distaste for anything possibly controversial, a lot of game developers go the indie route for game design when they have stories to tell involving anything that isn't monogamous, heterosexual, cisgender, etc. Which is good, less strain on the developers, much more creative freedom, etc.

So, religious summer camp of two gay girls and a trans girl, various body image conflicts, satanic overtones, light horror elements, short run time, low price. It's kind of match made in hell right? In a good way.

There isn't much to discuss in terms of non story elements. The user interface is clean, fullscreen works out of the book, the art style is simple but evocative, until the late game route reveals, where more inspired choices in art design rear their heads. The sound desing is excellent, reminds me of a lot of modern takes on horror from independent directors (Starry Eyes, It Follows, The House of the Devil), and I didn't experience many glitches, though presumably it's been polished a bit since release. On a more mixed note, the background of the camp is charmingly said to be photographed with disposable cameras and it suits the mood, but this is also a technique done in a lot of freeware games and independent visual novels to save on time and money. It doesn't come across cheaply used but it does come across as an economically made decision. It's mostly odd that it's listed as a feature, not really a negative trait but not as inspired as it could have been.

The story is the meat of the game. The decision mechanic is very traditional and simple, no time limit, no silent response, very linear progression, dialouge outside of choice space is repetitive on repeat playthroughs. The concepts explored in universe are very wishy-washy. A lot of ideas of the game should have been better explored, with crystals and radios and the nature of the camp all seemingly having little to no exposition. This works, to some degree, as you get to the core of the story with less deadweight, but having these unusual world design choices and not elaborating on them is a shame, kind of wasted potential. There is a lot of ambiguity in this game. A lot of things are left open to interpretation, and the nature of the possessions and the aftermath in all but the true ending are kind of up in the air. Ambiguity is good, being ambiguous is bad is what a language professor once taught me, and this game straddles the line between having ambiguity and being ambiguous. More often than not it is successful though, and the themes of body dysphoria, feelings of disconnect, Satan as empowerment not as sin, and summer time anxiety work very well with what we are given.

Last of note is character writing, which is largely good. The emphasis on internet punctuation (UM??? EXCUSE ME????? kind of thing) and syntax is noted and not to the game's detriment but against my personal taste, though much of the dialogue otherwise comes across legitmate to the characters. A lot of good can be said of the consistency of tone and the uncertainty of speech that is developed through the characters, however, as this game chooses a particular narrative atmosphere and very strongly sticks with it, throughout the three main routes. The true ending twists this a bit and manages to resonate well.

If cost to hour ratio is a concern for you, which is really never is of me unless we're talking triple a kind of affairs, this game runs light. I finished it pretty shortly, finishing it entirely at once, and speeding through choices I had already made. A more patient sort can get more time out of it, though I doubt anyone will really get an awful lot of play time out of it. If this is a concern wait for a sale, I suppose, but it is a worthy story nonetheless and I really enjoyed it. Always good to have realistic and positive depections of LGBT characters, even if it includes Satanic possession.

I liked it. Wasn't blown away, few small gripes, but it was really good, especially as for what it is.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
JanitorJoey
1.9 hrs on record
Posted: July 21
Seriously, you can’t release a visual novel (in which all you do is read text) with such clunky, incompressible, obnoxious writing. This story was a slog to get through, despite being one of the shortest and least satisfying visual novels I’ve ever finished.

The atmosphere is pretty on-point both visually and audibly and I think the themes present have good potential. But each scene feels totally detached and random, there’s very little context, and the writing does a poor job communicating the action between dialogue (especially the supernatural elements).

Truly a disappointing experience. If you want an engaging LGBTQ story with interesting characters and a fleshed-out, fun world play Read Only Memories instead.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
swordwitch
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: July 19
A beautiful game with a charming visual style and a soundtrack that sets the perfect mood. You haven't finished this game until you've played all four endings. Highly recommended.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
1.5 hrs on record
Posted: August 4
Oh my god. Okay, now, first off, let me iterate: I have played a lot of visual novels, and yes, they have all been gay visual novels, except for Sonic's Inflation Adventure, which I may have only played in a dream.
This is probably the best visual novel / interactive story type thing I have ever played. The only ones rivalling it are the Analogue/Hate series, which is only KIND of a visual novel, and I'm not even sure if it counts.

Okay... It's almost 3 AM, so I'm organizing this really weirdly. There's elements, y'see, Story, Characters, and Gameplay.

The story is ♥♥♥♥ing great. Obviously, there were outcomes I didn't really like, but I wasn't supposed to like them, so they worked out perfectly. The TRUE ending is my absolute favorite, but all endings were very entertaining. Hellish, but in the best way possible.

The characters were pretty great too. I definitely saw real people in each of the three main characters (and saw the characters in real people). Of course, I wish some aspects of their lives were clearer and more drawn-out, but the game is vague on purpose and often avoids going into character or background details for the sake of the story. Which is fine. The reason I desire more details about the characters is because I like them so much, not because they're lacking.

Gameplay-wise, well, it's a ♥♥♥♥ing visual novel. My only gripe is that the true ending is a little annoying to get, but that's all true endings, so it's a useless gripe. There are other aspects of gameplay though, like, visuals, audio, that sort of thing. I really like the visuals. "♥♥♥♥♥♥ trash summer camp" was captured perfectly, and the quality of each image imbues just that bit of eerieness when you need it. I liked the music a lot, so much so that I wish there was more of it! But I happen to enjoy weird lo-fi + electronic crap so I don't know how it holds up with other people.

Okay, and then, themes. Obviously, disillusionment (or just plain dissatisfaction) with Christianity is a huge thing here. A little off for me, because I wasn't raised with it, but I happen to really enjoy unorthodox interpretations of witchcraft and the devil and so forth, so it really resonated with me. Probably one of the biggest themes is isolation, or being unable (or unwilling) to "fit in," and the game handles this extraordinarily well. And there's the queer part of it, which is pretty clear and makes it all the better since it's a game by queer artists, for queer people. Plus, what better way to be isolated than to be queer? It all sort of goes together; it wouldn't make sense for these characters to be so isolated in a camp full of their peers in terms of age and background and NOT be queer.

I can barely stay awake and it's becoming even more evident, so I'll wrap this up: It's a great game, even for people who aren't into visual novels. If you're not queer or obsessed with the devil, it probably won't resonate as much with you, but you could very easily still enjoy it.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 10
To start off I'd like to say that this was definetly a wonderful visual novel, however there are some things that I have to point out. My first playthrough was moderately confusing because the amount of metaphors and hidden meanings within the game. To add onto that, it's practically impossible to figure out the meanings on your own. Once you play through (try for the red or yellow ending first) I'd recommend looking up a synopsis or reading through discussions on here to really piece the story together. Without finding the true meaning you'll be left after your first playthrough saying 'what the ♥♥♥♥ did I just play' and I doubt you'll be impressed. With that being said, once I found out the true meanings to this story I grew much fonder of the game and thoroughly enjoyed my second playthrough.

Secondly, it seems as though everyone adored the music in this game except me. I found it really unenjoyable and rather it sounds much more like plain noise than music. Slightly unbearable, but I'm getting used to it. Update: Idek how but my opinion on the music has done a 180. Hail Satan and Alec Lambert.

On the bright side, I grew very fond of the characters, one in particular I LOVE YOU VENUS Loved the visuals with the way the characters were drawn and the over-exposed camera shots for backround. Gave it a 90s feel. Overall, I recommend you purchase the game because deep within it are three beautiful stories of self acceptance that I will not forget. 4/5. Wish it had trading cards

For those of you who were confused let me try and sum it up here. The story is driven by the idea of the Devil. The Devil represents self-acceptance and how the world tries to repress people (in this game specifically LBGT+) Each character has something that the world has deemed unacceptable. For Jupiter, is that she is a lesbian. For Venus, is that she is a transgender. Neptune has been labeled a ♥♥♥♥ and I also assume she is bi. The setting of a Christian summer camp also really drives home the idea of having to conform to the world's standards. With the ending of each story, one of the characters is taken over by the devil, allowing them to accept themself. Another metaphor within the game is the radios. They represent communication and the ability communication has to overcome repression. The only character whose story is a little off the beaten path is Neptune. She herself long ago accepted the bad within her and at the end of her story tries to force the other two into realizing they're bad and accepting themselves.

The second meaning within the game is how in a group of three, two will always be closer. Also within the character's age group, usual friendship business usually feels like devilry. Especially at summer camp.


Pretty breif confusion summary, I recommend looking more into it.

HAIL SATAN Story will leave you a sad, gay, polyamourous, mess
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Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
330 of 395 people (84%) found this review helpful
292 people found this review funny
Recommended
3.0 hrs on record
Posted: February 15
Before I played this game I was Happy and Heterosexual. Now I'm sad and gay. 10/10 do reccomend.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
113 of 137 people (82%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Recommended
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: February 15
A couple tips if you've never played before:

• Play favorites on your first few playthroughs. Don't try to treat everyone equally until you've gotten the other endings.
• The music is a critical part of the atmosphere. Try playing it turned up just a little too loud.
• That said, the music during "4AM" starts with a loud, sudden tone--don't get jumpscared.

This game might not change your life like it did mine, but hey, maybe it will. Even if it doesn't, it will definitely make you Feel Things. I can't recommend We Know The Devil highly enough.
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65 of 73 people (89%) found this review helpful
36 people found this review funny
Recommended
1.7 hrs on record
Posted: March 25
this game promotes lesbianism AND satanism.

10/10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
42 of 45 people (93%) found this review helpful
13 people found this review funny
Recommended
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: February 22
warmed my poor little cold gay heart and promptly broke it into a million pieces

10/10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
70 of 90 people (78%) found this review helpful
76 people found this review funny
Recommended
7.0 hrs on record
Posted: February 16
i bought this game because visual novel means warm anime boobs but instead i got warm feelings inside of MY boob.... the boobs have turned
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
41 of 46 people (89%) found this review helpful
32 people found this review funny
Recommended
2.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
This is the best satanic polyamorous lesbian dating sim I have ever played.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
31 of 34 people (91%) found this review helpful
23 people found this review funny
Recommended
1.1 hrs on record
Posted: February 17
it turns out the real devil was the friends we made along the way
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24 of 25 people (96%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Recommended
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: April 15
Disclaimer: The reason I have next to no game time is that I bought and completed this game before the Steam release and only just received my key.
I've been staring at my screen for too long trying to express the intricacies of what this game made me feel in words, but I really can't. So: This game is sad and queer. I, too, am sad and queer. 10/10, play this game if you are sad and queer also.
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