Crush monsters and get loots in the classic turn-based style of deep dungeons and high adventure! Grow the Dungeonmans Academy, a bastion of learning that expands as you play. Serious gameplay with a light-hearted atmosphere, combining the feel of history's great RPGs and dice-slinging adventures around the tabletop.
User reviews:
Recent:
Mostly Positive (12 reviews) - 75% of the 12 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (319 reviews) - 92% of the 319 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Dec 9, 2014

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Recent updates View all (29)

June 29

1.4.1 Bugfix and Balance Patch

Bugfixes and balance changes abound, driven by the fans visiting the Twitch stream. Happy Steam Sale to all of you!

Corrupted Save Management
Effort has been made to backup saves correctly, and in the case that a save file is totally screwed for some reason, instead of crashing the game will (unfortunately!) abandon the Academy. If this happens to you, I am very sorry, and you can email me if you'd like to have a boosted Academy created for you to start off in.

New Dungeon Rooms!
53 new Dungeon Rooms! Standard dungeons now have more variety in their generation, with new shapes alongside the familiar ones. This won't drastically change gameplay but instead spice up the old familiars.

Rumor Dungeons
Dungeons generated by rumor-slinging Innkeepers will no longer spawn on top of existing dungeons. Furthermore, the available dungeons have expanded to Towers, Swamps, Temples, Graveyards and Advanced Dungeons.

Mountain Fortress
It's shorter. Your adolations are appreciated in advance.

Character Generation Perks
Scrounger now generates more loot, and has a chance of generating loot that is higher level than the area you're in.
All Weather has been boosted to add and resist 30% Fire and Cold damage, up from 10%

Enchantments and Upgrades
Bolster/Fortify/Enstremfenize scrolls can no longer fail and be destroyed with no effect. If you try to enchant a weapon that's full up on enchantments (star rank + 1), then the scroll fails but is not destroyed.
Souldrinking Scrolls are also failure-free, but if you try to enchant a fully enchanted item you lose your Stremf and get stugatz.
Upgrade Hammers now add "Hammered" to the item info box. Because you all have the memory of goldfish.
Weapon Enchantments On High End Gear 4 and 5 star items now have a greater chance of rolling on the top end enchant table.
Golden Chests should scale loot to the highest tiers now.
???????? that hammer upgrade that has taunted you forever can now be found.

Science and Consumables
Science now properly increases the duration of any buff applied to yourself via consumable. It also increases the duration of damage over time effects applied to enemies. This increase is limited to 100% of the original duration.
Barkskin and Ironskin Potions have been buffed into meaningfulness. In addition to flat 10% damage reduction and damage per hit reductions, they now add extra armor equal to T3 and T4 Real Armor chest pieces.
Pin To Win holds enemies for one additional round.
Glorious Healing Potions, should you ever see one, will have a minimum Glory Rank of 1.

Block and Parry
Block and Parry had math errors in damage reduction. These have been fixed -- unfortunately this results in a nerf to Parry, but a buff to Large Shields.

Minor Balance Issues
High-end crypts now have even stronger bosses, and can drop the best Souldrinking scrolls.
Phoenix Wing Angelsniper and Arcturus Lancer have been buffed.
Vanguard of the Abyss got a sick buff, and the horses happen more often.

The Forces of Evil Get Swole
Warlord Sorceror has expanded his knowledge of Foom to include Cold Damage!
Warlords have 8x more health.
Mazzik has 5x more health and does actual damage now.
Dread Spire bosses have 4000 health each.
Final Foom has like 100x more health, deal with it.

Bug Fix Grab Bag
Bonehewn Dreadplate
  • Fixed occasional crash with Barons jumping near you.
  • Fixed Barons not dropping you as a target when charmed.
  • Fixed Barons sometimes not having brohearts over their heads.
Retirement
  • Inns now show up properly.
  • Crashes involving other retirement issues have been fixed.
Other Fixes
  • Clicking on an item in the paper doll no longer causes it to Ninja Vanish.
  • New character powers are now slotted in the correct hotbar.
  • Items with dynamic names keep these names between saves.
  • Road encounters no longer corrupt the ground sprites when saved, loaded, saved again, and loaded once more.

12 comments Read more

June 2

Southern Gentlemans Update


The good ol' Southern Gentlemans has always been an outlier in the collection of various Dungeonmans classes. Designed as a fresh take on the Barbarian playstyle, the class provides large amounts of power for people willing to play recklessly and endure some randomness. Over the life of the game, there's been enough data collected and feedback generated to help paint a picture of how SG could be a more entertaining class to play.

The goal of this refresh is to make the various Southern Gentlemans masteries more useful as parts of other builds, as well as solidify the class to build a core strong enough to base a build around. Let's take a look!

New Class Features:

Rank: Just like the Psychomanser, Southern Gentlemans now has a ranking system. Each point you put in one of the three masteries will increase your rank by one. Your SG rank ties directly into two new class features listed below.

Ire and Irked: When you have 50 or more Ire, you are now Irked, and do additional damage in combat. This is a flat multiplier applied to all basic melee or ranged damage. The multiplier increases based on your SG rank.

Refreshing Beverages: Killing an enemy or damaging a Champion tier monster may result in a Refreshing Beverage falling onto the battlefield. These drinks immediately restore some health (Iced Tea) or stamina and mana (Mint Julep). The amount of resource restored is based on your SG rank.

Decorum:

Decorum now takes up one less button on the hotbar and is way more useful at shutting down powerful opponents, especially high-output melee enemies.

Rapier Wit: The bleed applied has been toughened up considerably and scales with Science.

Disarming Smile: This power is now a PASSIVE and adds a Despair effect to Rapier Wit. Check out Despair below.

Refreshments are Served: The heal has been improved slightly, but most importantly the visual effect has been made much clearer. Every counter attack provides a Refreshing Beverage visual.

Fire and Brimstone

These powers are now driven by Spellpower (and therefore, Foom) and have been made much less random in execution. Also, they no longer start tantrums, which will allow these powers a bit of depth that they were lacking before.

Blazing Vituperation: The F-Bombs now seek out enemies nearby and are no longer completely random. They also make an explosion on impact as well as continue to burn over a few rounds. The overall damage is about the same, but some of it has been moved forward into the explosion meaning that the F-Bombs can be used to kill an enemy before they get that last hit in. Also, the number of F-Bombs tossed increases with SG Rank. The cost has gone up to 20 Ire.

Icy Vitriol: This power no longer fires in a random direction but rather targets a nearby enemy and shoots a cone in that direction. Enemies hit by Icy Vitriol are Frozen in place and Scathed, reducing their damage output and increasing their damage taken. Take note, Icy Vitriol no longer deals damage. If you have to kill a pack of bees right-the-heck-now, this is the wrong power to use, but if you need to stall some foes while a power comes down off strain or to make a get away, this will help.]

Blasphemous Tirade: The damage has been improved slightly, but also scaled to work better with your stats. Survivors of the initial attack are knocked around at random. Be careful when shouting out words in a language you can barely comprehend, there could be trouble...

Sound and Fury

Unchanged. You either like chaining furious keybinds together or you don't. Remember, roaring in real life at the keyboard totally helps.

New Status Effect: Despair

This is a new debuff the player can put on to enemies, either through Rapier Wit + Disarming Smile or rare scrolls found in the mid to late game. Despair will strip an enemy of all buffs and shields, reduce their damage output, increase damage taken, and Addle them for a few rounds as well. The primary use of Despair is to have an ace in the hole against surprise Champions that your particular build might not be suited to handle.

Balances Changes / Bug Fixes

  • Protection From -Whatever- scrolls last for 30 rounds instead of 10.
  • The Academy Warchest now tosses loot into the world rather than just handing it to you.
  • AI attacks and reflected/tossed weapons now deprioritize inanimate objects.
  • Cleaned up input and text centering during the start of Ironmans mode.
  • 5th rank Mysterious Artifacts now show up at the Museum, starting with your next hero.
  • Volatile Liquidity only costs 1 Deadpulse now, really.
  • Lots of Hotbar fixes involving dragging items onto them. Less green squares, and (hopefully!) less swords being lost forever because you bound them to a key.
  • Sound effects added to a whole bunch of spells that were missing them, whoops.

9 comments Read more

Reviews

“Dungeonmans is a proper roguelike, the kind filled with turn-based fighting, scrolls and horrible death... Knowing my next character will potentially level up faster and hit harder on his way just make me want to keep playing until I can trounce everything in sight.”
Kotaku

“I had such a good time with Dungeonmans that I found myself bumping games off of my top 5 list for 2014 in order to make room for its last-minute inclusion.”
RPGFan

“If I had actual time to play games, that's the kinda game I would love to spend time with.”
PewDiePie

About This Game

Crush monsters and get loots in the classic turn-based style of deep dungeons and high adventure! Serious gameplay surrounded by a light-hearted atmosphere, designed to evoke the feel of history's great RPGs and dice-slinging adventures around the tabletop.

  • True roguelike adventure: turn-based, tough but fair, countless combat options.
  • More than 75 unique player abilities.
  • 12 different styles of Dungeons and Battlefields with more on the way.
  • Six class archetypes to mix and match.
  • 50+ enemies, including the fearsome Triger!
  • The Dungeonmans Academy, your home base that grows with each play.
  • A world-class soundtrack brimming with music straight from the era of RPG classics.

In an untamed wilderness, where civilization lives in the shadow of fearsome beasts and lawless villainy, the only light against the darkness are the courageous Dungeonmens! With cunning minds, mighty thews and iron wills, these great heroes and heroines are dedicated toward exploring the unknown, taming the wild, and crushing the fiercest of beasts.

Adventure begins at the Dungeonmans Academy, an ever-growing bastion of learning that expands and evolves based on the efforts of its graduates. As heroes return from their journeys burdened by giant piles of precious loot and ancient wisdom, the Academy grows and future graduates are able to take advantage of this knowledge, starting with a leg up on their quest to avenge the bold graduates who fell in previous battles.

The vast overworld teems with adventure! There are indeed dungeons deep and plentiful, but also dripping swamps, deathless crypts, huddled warrens, forest camps of bandits and highwaymen, ancient towers ruled by powerful despots, and even more terrible dangers waiting in the darkest shadows. A Dungeonmans rises to the challenge with a healthy mix of Skills and Masteries, fighting up close, at range, with steel and spell alike. Unfettered by "class restrictions", a Dungeonmans chooses the right tools for the battles ahead.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Mostly Positive (12 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (319 reviews)
Recently Posted
Mace Baby
( 22.7 hrs on record )
Posted: July 25
This is an amazingly good roguelike with legacy features (these are optional and can be turned off by starting an ironmode game for those who prefer the true roguelike experience). Useful because starting a roguelike with a fresh character gets old after the 20th time.

The classes are modular, as any character can learn any skill with enough levels or skill books, which can lead to some pretty powerful combinations of skills late game where they'll be needed. There's even a skill tree with a rage style resource that drains in real time, giving the game a faster pace than other roguelikes for players who take it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Patashu
( 59.7 hrs on record )
Posted: July 17
A simple to get into but still challenging turn based tile based roguelike with beautiful music, graphics and a lot of charm and wit, plus a lot of possible builds to explore.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
GHostLPs
( 15.4 hrs on record )
Posted: July 15
Dungeonmans is a fast-paced roguelike that has an excellent sense of humor. On top of all your normal roguelike tropes (permadeath, random dungeons, piles of gear, hordes of enemies to kill) Dungeonmans is built upon a number of pillars that make it an absolute joy to play.

Constant Progression (!! Optional !!)
This is something that could turn off someone looking for a more hardcore roguelike were it not entirely optional. When you first create an academy you have the option of instead making an Ironman Academy that forces you to start completely fresh with each character in that world.

If you elect not to play with an Ironman Academy, each dungeonman you throw out into the world will help to slowly build up your academy so that it grants bonuses to newly trained dungeonmans. These bonuses primarily come through proofs of stremf which allow you to increase your ability scores, but you also gain the ability to auto-identify potions and scrolls, and gain some (random) bonus skills on new characters.

Character Customization
There are no set classes in Dungeonmans. Instead you have a variety of different trees that you can pick and choose from to build your own character that plays how you want it to. Each tree encourages vastly different playstyles than others and mixing and matching abilities from all of these trees allows you to build some truly interesting characters. There are also a number of hidden trees that you unlock by learning certain groups of skills.

The level cap of 16 gives you a fair number of choices to work with (each class tree possesses 9 skills) and, if you choose to play a Dungeonmans instead of one of the preset skill allocations, you get five bonus points to spend on abilities which brings the total up to 21. Not only do you have many different options to choose from but, for the most part, they're very well balanced. I can't think of any specific ability that I would call useless and since skills don't have ranks, you never have to worry about whether spending a skill point to get a +X% bonus is actually worth it.

Oh, and you can find books that grant you skills that you might not otherwise have. They are fairly rare, though.

The World
Once you've chosen the type of academy you wish to create (see Constant Progression below) the overworld is procedurally generated and, once generated, it remains static between characters. On the overworld is your academy, a number of towns, and many dungeons to explore.

Towns serve as hubs to sell your loot and purchase consumables or possibly equipment upgrades. You can also upgrade towns with items that you find in certain types of overworld encounters. Doing so increases the quality of goods that they have for sale. These town improvements carry over between characters and if you max out a town's "prosperity" they build a statue of the character that helped them out so selflessly.

There are a handful of different types of dungeons in Dungeonmans. You have your typical dungeons, as well as towers, temples, graveyards, and possibly a few types beyond that which I haven't encountered yet. Towers, temples, and graveyards are all unique in that they have their own way of going about the dungeon crawl. In towers you're going up a spiral layout to face off against a powerful tower guardian in a one-on-one bout. Temples see you puzzling out how to open their gate (hint: it involves violence) before working down into their depths to defeat the temple master in a grueling trap-filled arena. Finally, graveyards see you fighting through hordes of undead to plunder a tomb filled with horrible undead monstrosities that are all to happy to add you to their numbers.

There is also a semi-secret post-game dungeon that lets you play indefinitely should you so desire.

Combat
Combat in Dungeonmans is much faster paced than in most roguelikes and this can certainly be offsetting to those expecting a game where you have to constantly plan out what you're doing every turn. There's actually an entire skill tree based around playing recklessly that rewards you for not taking time to think between mowing through your enemies. To emphasize this, the majority of enemies that you face will fall easily to even your basic attacks. You will quickly learn that not paying attention, however, often ends up with your dungeonman getting a rather permanent case of death. Champion enemies will pose a threat to those who play recklessly and their telltale glow should always see you stopping to take a minute to assess the threat they pose.

In addition to champions there are also the various bosses you'll face at the end of dungeons. As far as I'm aware, dungeon bosses are simply more dangerous versions of the champions you'd otherwise be facing. This does not exctend to the bosses of towers and temples. Tower and temple bosses are bad news and will wipe the floor with you if you go in expecting to simply smack them in the faces until they die.

Generally speaking, so long as you're in an area of appropriate difficulty, you don't have to worry about being surprise one-shot. There are a few situations when it can happen, though, notably when opening secret doors (let's just say that some secret doors were made to keep things in). Even situations where you face overwhelming enemy forces can be escaped from so long as you hold onto resources that let you quickly escape from combat situations. Do your best to always have at least a scroll or two of combat blinking on hand at all times!

Loot!
Dungeonmans takes an almost action-RPG route with how it doles out loot. Each item type is present in several tiers, with each tier being more powerful than the last. On top of that, items can be randomly rolled with affixes that add various modifiers to them. Like in an action-RPG you have your common items that don't have any magical properties, you have magical items that have a few properties, you have rare items that have many properties, and then you have artifacts that have a few unique properties that can't be found anywhere else.

In addition to finding loads of magical items, you can also make your own (or further buff the ones you have)! In your travels you will find magical scrolls that enable you to layer additional special properties onto equipment that you find. There are limits to how much magic an item can hold, but by the time you reach them you'll have some incredibly potent gear.

If you're looking for a very particular modifier on an item, you can mill down items at your academy and use the resulting resources to craft magical hammers that allow you to apply specific affixes to equipment.

No Auto-Explore
This is something that I consider a non-issue and is really only here because it's something I've seen the roguelike community bash the game for. You actually have to press keys to explore dungeons in Dungeonmans, the game won't do it for you. If you want the game to do your dungeon diving for you, you're going to have a bad time with Dungeonmans.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Cahal
( 48.3 hrs on record )
Posted: July 8
The game's difficulty curve comes in the form of an ever-increasing likelihood to crash and leave your save unplayable. A true roguelike.

Also, the error message from crashing is completely hidden from the desktop for me and counts as the game still running. I'm pretty sure I played the error report window significantly longer than I played the game.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Keemossi
( 7.0 hrs on record )
Posted: July 5
Tedious to play, no autoexplore, nearly all enemies are popcorn save the few that will two-shot you. Playing with Academy you can grind any amount of stats and power to faceroll through the game, it's not even a roguelike. Playing without Academy, it's a really buggy (just try the unarmed skills!), unbalanced and clunky roguelike that still allows you to grind however long and much you want, with no food clock and infinite sources of loot.

On the bright side, it's still better than Dredmor (*anything* is), and writing's rather funny.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
jorgonq
( 11.3 hrs on record )
Posted: July 4
This game has so much potential and yet... ugh. It starts out with character creation. If you don't like your stat options you can discard your character but never use that name again. Really? Thats just silly. The combat itself starts out easy, you should be able to roll through the dungeon a-ok. After that though, this game falls into the trap that so many do. The difficulty scales very sharply and if you don't nail your build you die. Another failing of this game, like so many like it, all it takes is one lucky crit from an enemy and everything goes down hill. This game was fun for a few hours but no more. Glad I bought it on sale.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
elibrmn
( 33.3 hrs on record )
Posted: July 4
Please send help, monsters are all over the place and everyone is in danger, oh wait, that's my job. Time to go kick ♥♥♥ (and die horribly)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
BaSeriosity
( 35.3 hrs on record )
Posted: July 3
Tough, but fair. Quite a steep learning curve, but once you get over the initial hump you'll be enjoying excellent gameplay and a unique rogue-like.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
WaLter
( 69.2 hrs on record )
Posted: July 3
Truly a wonderful rogue-like game.

The game has wonderful balance which eliminates being killed by some one off insta kill hit. Not once did I ever feel as if I was too powerful to where the enemies were a joke or that I was being absolutely destroyed to where I wanted to quit. The progression system with the academy works wonderfully and gives you just a slight boost in the beginning to get you on your feet when you start a new character.

Again a wonderful game that I would recommend to anyone who is a fan of rogue-like games.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
diabolicwraith77
( 287.2 hrs on record )
Posted: July 2
Love the game, but its gotten to the point, when I go back to load my game, it crashes and just lose all my characters. Maybe its time for me to retire from it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
48.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 8
The game's difficulty curve comes in the form of an ever-increasing likelihood to crash and leave your save unplayable. A true roguelike.

Also, the error message from crashing is completely hidden from the desktop for me and counts as the game still running. I'm pretty sure I played the error report window significantly longer than I played the game.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
15.4 hrs on record
Posted: July 15
Dungeonmans is a fast-paced roguelike that has an excellent sense of humor. On top of all your normal roguelike tropes (permadeath, random dungeons, piles of gear, hordes of enemies to kill) Dungeonmans is built upon a number of pillars that make it an absolute joy to play.

Constant Progression (!! Optional !!)
This is something that could turn off someone looking for a more hardcore roguelike were it not entirely optional. When you first create an academy you have the option of instead making an Ironman Academy that forces you to start completely fresh with each character in that world.

If you elect not to play with an Ironman Academy, each dungeonman you throw out into the world will help to slowly build up your academy so that it grants bonuses to newly trained dungeonmans. These bonuses primarily come through proofs of stremf which allow you to increase your ability scores, but you also gain the ability to auto-identify potions and scrolls, and gain some (random) bonus skills on new characters.

Character Customization
There are no set classes in Dungeonmans. Instead you have a variety of different trees that you can pick and choose from to build your own character that plays how you want it to. Each tree encourages vastly different playstyles than others and mixing and matching abilities from all of these trees allows you to build some truly interesting characters. There are also a number of hidden trees that you unlock by learning certain groups of skills.

The level cap of 16 gives you a fair number of choices to work with (each class tree possesses 9 skills) and, if you choose to play a Dungeonmans instead of one of the preset skill allocations, you get five bonus points to spend on abilities which brings the total up to 21. Not only do you have many different options to choose from but, for the most part, they're very well balanced. I can't think of any specific ability that I would call useless and since skills don't have ranks, you never have to worry about whether spending a skill point to get a +X% bonus is actually worth it.

Oh, and you can find books that grant you skills that you might not otherwise have. They are fairly rare, though.

The World
Once you've chosen the type of academy you wish to create (see Constant Progression below) the overworld is procedurally generated and, once generated, it remains static between characters. On the overworld is your academy, a number of towns, and many dungeons to explore.

Towns serve as hubs to sell your loot and purchase consumables or possibly equipment upgrades. You can also upgrade towns with items that you find in certain types of overworld encounters. Doing so increases the quality of goods that they have for sale. These town improvements carry over between characters and if you max out a town's "prosperity" they build a statue of the character that helped them out so selflessly.

There are a handful of different types of dungeons in Dungeonmans. You have your typical dungeons, as well as towers, temples, graveyards, and possibly a few types beyond that which I haven't encountered yet. Towers, temples, and graveyards are all unique in that they have their own way of going about the dungeon crawl. In towers you're going up a spiral layout to face off against a powerful tower guardian in a one-on-one bout. Temples see you puzzling out how to open their gate (hint: it involves violence) before working down into their depths to defeat the temple master in a grueling trap-filled arena. Finally, graveyards see you fighting through hordes of undead to plunder a tomb filled with horrible undead monstrosities that are all to happy to add you to their numbers.

There is also a semi-secret post-game dungeon that lets you play indefinitely should you so desire.

Combat
Combat in Dungeonmans is much faster paced than in most roguelikes and this can certainly be offsetting to those expecting a game where you have to constantly plan out what you're doing every turn. There's actually an entire skill tree based around playing recklessly that rewards you for not taking time to think between mowing through your enemies. To emphasize this, the majority of enemies that you face will fall easily to even your basic attacks. You will quickly learn that not paying attention, however, often ends up with your dungeonman getting a rather permanent case of death. Champion enemies will pose a threat to those who play recklessly and their telltale glow should always see you stopping to take a minute to assess the threat they pose.

In addition to champions there are also the various bosses you'll face at the end of dungeons. As far as I'm aware, dungeon bosses are simply more dangerous versions of the champions you'd otherwise be facing. This does not exctend to the bosses of towers and temples. Tower and temple bosses are bad news and will wipe the floor with you if you go in expecting to simply smack them in the faces until they die.

Generally speaking, so long as you're in an area of appropriate difficulty, you don't have to worry about being surprise one-shot. There are a few situations when it can happen, though, notably when opening secret doors (let's just say that some secret doors were made to keep things in). Even situations where you face overwhelming enemy forces can be escaped from so long as you hold onto resources that let you quickly escape from combat situations. Do your best to always have at least a scroll or two of combat blinking on hand at all times!

Loot!
Dungeonmans takes an almost action-RPG route with how it doles out loot. Each item type is present in several tiers, with each tier being more powerful than the last. On top of that, items can be randomly rolled with affixes that add various modifiers to them. Like in an action-RPG you have your common items that don't have any magical properties, you have magical items that have a few properties, you have rare items that have many properties, and then you have artifacts that have a few unique properties that can't be found anywhere else.

In addition to finding loads of magical items, you can also make your own (or further buff the ones you have)! In your travels you will find magical scrolls that enable you to layer additional special properties onto equipment that you find. There are limits to how much magic an item can hold, but by the time you reach them you'll have some incredibly potent gear.

If you're looking for a very particular modifier on an item, you can mill down items at your academy and use the resulting resources to craft magical hammers that allow you to apply specific affixes to equipment.

No Auto-Explore
This is something that I consider a non-issue and is really only here because it's something I've seen the roguelike community bash the game for. You actually have to press keys to explore dungeons in Dungeonmans, the game won't do it for you. If you want the game to do your dungeon diving for you, you're going to have a bad time with Dungeonmans.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 4 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
56.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 2
This game was on my wishlist for almost a year, until I pulled the triger (huehue)!

As it turns out, I waited too long! This game shot from 0 to Top 2 roguelikes within minutes. It really is tough, but fair, so expect to die a little.

Insane replay-value and great variety of tactical choices.

Full recommendations!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
133 of 145 people (92%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
104.2 hrs on record
Posted: December 9, 2014
A long time ago when I was only young I played a Roguelike- This Roguelike was pretty much perfect in my eyes. It had a great mix between being challenging and being accessible. The name of this Roguelike was Castle of the Winds and it has long held a place in my heart as being the best of show out there for this genre. Now I think after many years Castle of the Winds has finally been toppled in my eyes.

Dungeonmans is the best Roguelike I have played in a long time- it has an easy to learn and use gameplay which is unforgivable the further out you go. The game captures everything that I loved about Castle of the Winds- the crisp but simple art, the spellbooks for learning new spells, the absurdity of monsters you find in the deep... Then it puts everything into overdrive. With Dungeonmans one of the most innovative features is the Academy which grows based on deeds, you don't simply pour money into this academy to make it better, you fill it with the blood and sweat of a ton of dead dungeonmans. As someone who always likes persistant strength options in Roguelikes, this is good, but what makes it better is the fact that all of the unlocked perks are optional to pick up. If the game is too easy for you, just don't pick up the perk at the start. No harm done. You will still do awesomely if you are skilled enough for the task.

The music of Dungeonmans is also pretty phenominal due to being the work of the great Zircon, a remix artist who makes the game come alive. The art is pretty standard, but the simplistic nature of it actually works well with what is trying to be achived. As you go deeper into the many dungeons you will find an increasingly powerful variety of loot capable of making you feel like a king- and if you die while carrying one of your favourite swords it is even possible to find the sword in a later playthrough in a more powerful form.

There is so much to unlock in this game too- you can find hidden skills, dungeons, artifacts of power and more based on how you play and what you do. I won't spoil them, but basically the game rewards you all the way in the best possible way. Overall- this game scratches many itches for me. The itch for a good Roguelike, the itch for constructing my own "x", the itch to find a game I can happily play for countless hours-

Full disclosure though- At the end of this I feel that I should say I was a kickstarter backer. While I don't belive my experience has been coloured by that fact, it is possible that some of my praise is the work of a Rosetinted Glasses look of someone who didn't want to have wasted their money. So please do take my review with that in mind,

EDIT: Also one slight warning- The game is best played with the numpad for movement so if you have a laptop which does not have one... keep that in mind. There is mouse control but it makes the game seem a lot more "slippery". Though, it should also be said numpad controls is just another reason why this game is rocking it CoTW style.
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102 of 113 people (90%) found this review helpful
Recommended
45.8 hrs on record
Posted: May 28, 2014
I backed this game on Kickstarter many months ago and it has been one of the few games that hasn't disappointed me at all.
I'll start by saying this is my favourite game out there, literally.
I must have clocked in hundreds of hours since I backed this on Kickstarter last year and i've loved every moment of it.
I've always been a fan of traditional roguelikes, even those that use a ASCII style interface and though recently i've seen more and more games being released as roguelikes none of them really seemed to feel like them to me. That was until Dungeonmans. Dungeonmans is a roguelike in the purest sense made by someone who clearly loves the genre.

In Dungeonmans You start by picking from 4 random rolled stats (Stremf, Skills, Science and Foom) and then your class from many different classes. Each class starts with different player abilities which you can choose to level up as you play on through the game.
A key feature to me that makes it stand out is the fact that when you level up and choose new abilities you can choose any from the skill tree, even if that was not the class you chose to play in. Feel like running around with a shield as a Rangermans? Well, you're free to do so. Just...don't.
The game, like all roguelikes, has permadeath but that's not the end of your adventure. As you travel through the world and various dungeons you'll kill bosses and collect artifacts and books. Both of these things can be used to level up your 'Academy' which is where you, and all new-spawns will start. Upgrading the academy and bringing back artifacts unlocks things like 'all level 1 potions identified for every new Dungeonman you play with, so even though you lose your progress and level on your Dungeonman when you die, you don't feel like you're starting over entirely.

I've played games like Dungeons of Dredmoor, Rogue Legacy and other modern Rogue-likes and they are great but there is something about Dungeonmans that keeps me wanting to come back and die just once more.
And you will come back to it, over and over, and most likely die, over and over, but dying never felt this good before.
I should also mention that whilst I play keyboard-only, for those who aren't too comfortable with that there is an option to use your mouse aswell :)

There isn't too much else I can say about the game, the simplicity and beauty of it is in playing it for yourself. Now that the game is out of Early Access it's content rich and even more fun than before.
So if you want a modern yet honest-to-the-name rogue-like with tons of loot, enemies, a soundtrack that really makes you feel epic and dungeon after dungeons after dungeon then this is the game for you.

Just remember, as the developer says himself.
Don't. Get. Surrounded.
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55 of 58 people (95%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
122.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 6, 2015
For a while now I've considered myself a fan of the rogue-like/rogue-lite genres. I've played more than a dozen of both the free and paid varieties over the years and I'm sure that number will only grow. Despite the breadth of the rogue-like/rogue-lite genres and the sheer variety of games and game mechanics contained in those terms, Dungeonmans is among my favorites. But to understand why I love this game, you first have to understand what it is not.

  • Dungeonmans is not a story-based experience in the slightest. If that's what you want, look elsewhere.
  • Dungeonmans is not the sort of rogue-like where starvation is a constant threat--there is no hunger mechanic whatsoever.
  • Dungeonmans is not a rogue-lite. You will not find the twin stick shooter chaos of Binding of Isaac. You will not find the platforming of Spelunky. You will not find the music-based gameplay of Crypt of the Necrodancer. You will not find the castlevania stylings of Rogue Legacy. All of those games are good, but they are not what you will find in Dungeonmans.

What you WILL find in Dungeonmans:
  • A skill system that rewards patience and emphasizes maneuvering above all else.
  • Several classes, from the conventional warrior/mage/archer archetypes to the less common like polearm specialists who can create area of effect zones to bolster their power/debuff their enemies and berserkers with a penchant for dressing with class and drinking tea.
  • The ability to ignore the preset classes and tinker with hybrid builds as you see fit. Wizard/necromancer? Done. Archer with plate armor? Fair enough. Some dude who picks and chooses from several classes at once and potentially sucks at all of them? Rather likely in the short term while you figure things out.
  • Dungeons to delve and monsters to slay, from slimes and evil wizards to pseudo-British bomb throwing anarchists.
  • A system of progression that allows you to build off the successes of previous characters through things like auto-identified potions and scrolls, better starting gear, or more stats to go around. Or, if you feel like it, none of that at all.
  • An overworld map teeming with dungeons to explore, towns to sell excess loot, and occasional bandit camps.
  • The roguelike staple of potentially cursed gear.
  • Hidden shops staffed entirely by talking bees.

It's not a perfect game, as no such game exists. The progression system inevitably bothers rogue-like purists, even though it can be almost entirely ignored or opted-out of. The game's sense of humor can and does rub some people the wrong way. The flexibility of the skill system can leave some players lost, or others annoyed that it isn't as complicated as say, Tales of Maj Eyal. Yet looked at strictly on its own merits, Dungeonmans is what many rogue-likes strive to be: a rewarding adventure where the risk of death comes primarily from player carelessness, where mechanics are simple enough to learn but deep enough to experiment with, and there are always more foes lying in wait to slay. Give it a shot.
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74 of 91 people (81%) found this review helpful
Recommended
1.7 hrs on record
Posted: December 9, 2014
Underneath the silly, this is actually a pretty fun & well put together Roguelike (a REAL roguelike - not those games with permadeath and level generators that call themselves "roguelikes"), with enough unique features to keep it interesting. Its more than just running dungeons, you have your "Dungeonmans Academy" you need to bring things too to make it better, an overworld to explore, ect. Theres lots to do, many character class & traits choices. I havent played too much yet, but this looks like a Roguelike I'll have fun with.

The silly, however, is overpowering. Sometimes its amusing, but IMHO it beats you over the head a little too much. It may be funny if you're a teenage guy, I'm a 30-something chick, so I can't judge there. Still, theres lots of clever Roguelike humor for long-term rogue players.

It is out of E. A. but still seems a bit incomplete (the "help" button in options does nothing that I could see), there are gender options such as "beast" and "who cares" but the only images are of stereotypical fantasy males and females. Come on, if youre going to be silly, give us some funny icons to work with those genders!

The graphics are pixel tiles. They are colorful and cartoony and fit well with the style of the game. My one (minor) complaint is getting new weapons and armor does nothing to your tile. Like if you have the barbarian shirtless guy with the sword, he remains the shirtless guy with the sword even if youre wearing platemail and carrying an axe. Its kind of nitpicky, but Roguelikes have progressed from the days of "@", or even the tile systems of *Angband. I love games like Tales of Maj'Eyal, or Rogue's Tale where your tile changes depending on what you have equipped. It would be an asset here.

Overall though, this game is defintely worth taking a look at for Rogue fans. It has a lot of content and is something a little different.
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51 of 62 people (82%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Recommended
114.7 hrs on record
Posted: April 16, 2015
This is a letter I just wrote to PC Gamer, they probably wont reply, but it reflects how I feel about dungeonmans:

Dear Tyler@pcgamer,

You guys ran an article a while back, giving a tip on an "in development" game called Dungeonmans. I had already been a kickstarter backer when you ran the article, but really didnt have too high of hopes for the game. I was on a kickstarter binge for a while there, and dungeonmans was kind of my long shot.

In the time since you ran that article, dungeonmans has released, along with a few of my other kickstarter backed games (at least EA builds).

These games include:
Massive Chalice
Road Redemption
Wasteland 2
Shovel Knight
Dreamfall Chapters
Elite Dangerous
Godus (bleh)
Star Citizen

I have spent far more hours in Dungeonmans, than any of those other games. Not saying I dont like the others, they are all (for the most part) great, but Dungeonmans is up there with Spelunky for me in the roguelike genre. It is currently my 9th most played game on Steam with a library of around 300 games. Obliviously most of those dont get much play time at all, but I do game every day (95% Counter Strike), and Dungeonmans keeps drawing me back, especially when I'm in game downtime (waiting for a team).

My whole point in all of this is that it would be really cool for you guys to run a review on this game sometime. I think its fully released now, its been quite polished for some time.

It kind of makes me sad that this game didnt make a top chart once, I keep looking for it to gain some love, but I just havent seen much press on it. Get one of your rogulike lovers on it, I would be surprised if they didnt like it. Seriously, the game is like crack.

I bought it for my friend who is also my main CS teammate, we talk dungeonmans builds all the time. I honestly havent even beat it yet, I'm not sure I've even gotten close.

Anyway, I probably sound like I work for dungeonmans at this point (I dont, as far as I know its made by a single person, maybe two), I honestly just feel like gamers need to play this one. Its truly a hidden gem.

Thanks for your time

________________________________________________________________________________

So yes, Thumbs up
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51 of 63 people (81%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.9 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: May 28, 2014
I'm really enjoying it! Your Academy provides a great element of persistence in a game (and genre) with permadeath that makes it really appealing to me! Here's a video of my first look at the game... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9H58QoVuYVM
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29 of 34 people (85%) found this review helpful
Recommended
53.7 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: October 17, 2014
What is best in life?

I started playing this game around Early Access v1.2, with diminished expectations. It looked like a typical sprite-based permadeath fantasy roguelike-like, something I'm not the biggest fan of.

Appearances can be deceiving. Having logged many hours since, I find Dungeonmans rather unique. There are roguelike elements, yes, but also a plethora of accessible game design concepts from other genres, some of which have been unjustly abandoned for years, all stuffed into the trappings of a modern indie game.

Remember the simplistic visual charm of early turn-based PC RPGs, such as the SSI Gold Box D&D titles? Dungeonmans has that. How about the grand, synthesized orchestral scores of early Playstation JRPGs? That's here, too. Weaponry with dramatic prefixes and suffixes that denote their crazy powers? A wide variety of procedurally-generated dungeon styles? Humorous tongue-in-cheek dialogue and item descriptions? Skill trees? Potions galore?

Dungeonmans is both a parody and an homage to the best aspects of role-playing games over the past two decades, and a sort of fast-paced frustration-free approach to the roguelike model. Yes, each Dungeonmans (or gender-equal Lady Dungeonmans) gets but one life to live, but they leave behind a wide selection of enhancements for the next adventurer in line, some more difficult to retrieve than others. Defeat is quickly forgotten, vengeance is sworn, and progress resumes on the path to crush your enemies.

While all the post-mortem handouts make the game less punishing than the average roguelike, mistakes made in combat still lead to a swift death. However, once a player learns the effect of each skill, and how they interact with statistics and potion-based enhancements, progress is limited only by how aggressively you wish to press your luck. Bigger risks bring bigger rewards, and it feels pretty great to outsmart a party of high-level monsters, see them driven before you, then return triumphantly back to the Dungeonmans Academy with many Proofs of Stremf.

The numerous skill trees lead to many different but equally successful play styles, which keeps things fresh. Speedy players can blast through dungeons as a rampaging “Southern Gentlemans”, while methodical players can become a plodding pillar of death with “Sword & Board”. Understanding the abilities in each tree is essential when taking a Dungeonmans and the Academy to the highest level, and the truly skilled will leave behind only a few grave markers on the path to ultimate success.

The visual presentation is a good fit with the gameplay, with colorful sprites and environments hearkening back to the pixel art of the 1990s. The avatar selection for the player is limited but memorable, with a range of exaggerated, comical designs to choose from. Distinct sound effects make in-game events easy to identify, and Zircon's soundtrack is fantastic, especially for fans of Hitoshi Sakimoto (Final Fantasy Tactics, Vagrant Story).

So what's missing in Early Access, as of the current v1.6c build? Odds and ends, really. Some graphics are absent, or need to be reworked to better fit the style. There are loopholes to farm stat bonuses that haven't been closed. End game content is sparse. The highest tiers of weapons and armor aren't available. However, unlike other alphas, the game is stable and highly playable. You can create characters, kill monsters, hear the lamentations of their gender-neutral life partners, buy stuff, sell stuff, read books, burn books, slam bad guys, slam potions, and I have yet to get tired of any of it.

On top of all that, the creator of the game is extremely accessible. Jim hosts bi-weekly live development streams, where soon-to-be-released content is tweaked before an audience. He checks social media and forums regularly, and I haven't seen a question or suggestion go unanswered. This is about as active and transparent as Early Access gets, and may very well be the best part about Dungeonmans.

If you're looking for a pure unforgiving RNG-heavy dungeon-crawling permadeath fix, look elsewhere. If you fancy genre mash-ups chock-full of swords, sorcery, sandals, monsters, monster blood, traps, digital die rolls, throwback charm, and use of the word "enstremfinize", then I highly recommend Dungeonmans.
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