Massive scale 4X-RTS set in space. Control hundreds of planets, manipulate galactic politics, research numerous advanced technologies, and command thousands of units and hundreds of planets in your quest for galactic dominance.
User reviews: Very Positive (369 reviews) - 81% of the 369 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Mar 27, 2015

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Recommended By Curators

"One of the most in-depth 4X Space RTS games out there with Single/Multiplayer modes. Could possibly become one of the best all-time with a few tweaks. "
Read the full review here.

Recent updates View all (16)

May 12

Star Ruler 2: v1.0.2 Update - May 12th

We just released our first minor content update for Star Ruler 2 since release. As always, read about some of the highlights here, or scroll down for a full changelog.

Research Web Overhaul

The research grid and associated graphics have been completely redone, making research paths and unlocks clearer and easier to use.

Quantum Batteries

The new quantum battery modifier can be used to partially satisfy a subsystem's power needs, but needs to be charged with your empire's Energy when constructed.

Additional Race Traits

A number of new race traits have been added, based on a point buy system. Every race starts with 1 free trait point to spend, and all of the default races have been given an additional default trait choice to make use of it.

Full Changelog
  • Overhauled the research grid to be more readable and easier to use.
  • Added a number of positive and negative traits that can be selected in race customization. Races can pick one free positive trait, and all of the default races have been given an extra bonus trait.
  • Added Quantum Battery modifier.
  • Added Shield Hardener subsystem.
  • Larger weapons now have comparatively longer reload times.
  • Rebalanced various values on weapon types.
  • Terraforming now gets more expensive the further away from the labor source you queue it.
  • Control Computers now give a scaling effectiveness bonus for the first 30 seconds of any combat.
  • Fixed being able to construct motherships that make money.
  • Fixed being able to construct singularity labs in nebulas.

17 comments Read more


“Star Ruler 2 expertly balances complexity in gameplay with an intuitive, easy to pick up system for players.”
'Recommended' – eXplorminate

About This Game

Star Ruler 2 is a massive scale 4X/RTS set in space. Explore dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of systems in a galaxy of your choosing, expand across its planets, exploit the resources you find, and ultimately exterminate any who stand in your way. The fate of your empire depends on your ability to master the economy, field a military, influence galactic politics, and learn what you can about the universe.

Galactic Economy

Colonize planets, each with one of dozens of resources, working in unison to create bustling centers of production. The resources you choose matter, and will guide your empire and its conflicts throughout the entire game.

Custom Ships

Design ships that fit your needs, strategies, and tactics using our new 'blueprint painting' approach to ship design. Quickly and intuitively lay out the armor, weapons, engines, and internals of your vessels.

Politics with Power

Diplomacy and influence gathering are reinvented as a core mechanic of the game, giving meaningful alternative options to players and serving as a platform of interaction both between players and AIs as well as humans in multiplayer. Harness your influence to annex territory, spy on enemies, aid allies, and more! You truly have the opportunity to affect the political landscape.

Massive Scale

Running on our internally developed Starflare Engine, Star Ruler 2 is able to make full use of multi-core cpus, and runs on both 32 bit and 64 bit machines. The size of a galaxy is only limited by your hardware and ambitions!

Intricate Research

Expand your knowledge through a grid of numerous technologies, big and small. Improve nearly every aspect of your empire.

Complete Moddability

You can modify the gameplay, graphics, interface, and virtually every other facet of the game through scripts and data files, giving unprecedented freedom to the modding community to implement any feature they want. Use the in-game mod editor to add or change most content, and upload your mod to the Steam Workshop!

Full Multiplayer

Star Ruler 2 features complete multiplayer support with up to 28 players and AIs in the same game.

Games above 8 players or in galaxies of several hundred systems may exceed the capacity of a typical home connection. Consider playing very large games on LAN.

Cross-Platform Support

Star Ruler 2 supports both Windows and Linux, with all game features supported fully on and between both operating systems.

System Requirements

SteamOS + Linux
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: SSE2 Capable processor
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: AMD or Nvidia Graphics card w/ 512MB RAM, OpenGL 2.1 Support
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 600 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Hardware requirements not final. Broadband required for internet play.
    • OS: Windows 7 64-bit
    • Processor: Intel Core i7 or AMD Phenom II
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 460 w/ 1GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 600 MB available space
    • OS: Linux
    • Processor: SSE2 Capable processor
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: AMD or Nvidia Graphics card w/ 512MB RAM, OpenGL 2.1 Support
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 600 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Hardware requirements not final. Broadband required for internet play.
    • OS: Linux
    • Processor: Intel Core i7 or AMD Phenom II
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 460 w/ 1GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 600 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
386 of 400 people (97%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
62.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 8
There are two types of people who play Star Ruler 2.

The first type are the kind of people who will not like this game. These people generally will lodge complaints including but not limited to:

- Not as complicated as the first game
- Art style differs from my preference
- I dislike the economy system
- Combat is too hands-off
- There is no "soul"
- The menus don't look like the first game
- Research sucks
- Diplomacy is confusing/useless

These people also often do not have more than a few hours in game time. I'll tell you right now, at 5 hours in I had exactly the same complaints. The problem is that SR2 doesn't have a very good tutorial and that a lot of the complexity is somewhat hidden. Some of those complaints are also purely subjective and therefore cannot be addressed beyond "Yep, ok". For the rest of them, see below.

To a person who hasn't played more than one or two games against some regular AIs, the combat would most certainly appear to be blob vs. blob. However once you realize how damage works and how to effectively utilize the support AI patterns it becomes obvious that, while not micro intensive, the combat is far from hands-off. It's just that the hands-on part happens in the preparation. Armor type makes a HUGE difference. Taking a torpedo on reactive armor will produce very different results that taking it on ablative. Neutronium may seem like an uber-armor but since it's so heavy and expensive it's rarely cost-effective. Weapon types are very important, the difference in effectiveness between a railgun and a laser depending on the situation can be vast. Ship speed is vital to not only engaging in time but fleeing as well, especially if you have no hyperdrive. Speaking of FTL, the type you have plays a big role in how you approach combat. Pinpoint Hyperdrive strikes are certainly effective, but fling beacons are far superior for offense (due to their speed and usually lower cost vs distance) though they lack easy-retreat capability. Gates are usually only used for turtling, but a gate in deep space can attack an opponent at points and from directions they don't expect. Slipstream can be used the same way except with less setup and more risk (since the enemy can also use your slipstream tears). There is a ton of depth, but again most (though not all) of it is in the setup.

The economy would certainly seem strange and stupid, after all you can't stockpile resources and have to expand. Except that the cycle system discourages inactive play and actually results in the player actually making MORE ships and improvements than they would otherwise. Dry Docks can help you build ships that you couldn't otherwise afford. The forced expansion eliminates AI abuse strategies and also makes empire defense more of a priority. Even the smallest world can be a critical component in the supply chain for your L5 forge world. Losing a link in the chain doesn't have immediate crippling effects but it's certainly not something to ignore. The pressure system eliminates the need to micromanage planets beyond choosing good supplies and letting the system do its work. The level 0 resources (they don't contribute to planetary development) provide a variety of useful effects and if used correctly can provide a significant advantage. Terraforming can help provide more L1 resources for extra income and Artifacts/building/diplomacy can provide food and water if there is a shortage.

Research would seem like a step back from the first game until you realize that SR1's research system, while unique, was inherently broken. Ships were outdated before they were even finished being built and the effectiveness of subsystems grew to such absurdities that tech advantages were instant-win conditions. The new tree applies passives automatically without the need for retrofit except if new systems are to be applied, and while not infinitely scalable is not the silver bullet in engagements that it was in SR1. Good tactics and planning can easily defeat fleets of twice the strength of what you're throwing at them. However it's fairly obvious why a lot of people would fail at this, since if you believe the combat to be DeathBlob Fights 2015 you wouldn't think of using any flanking or varied fleet makeups.

Very few people complain about the diplomacy beyond "I don't like it" but the solution is simple. Add "Influence Peddling" to the main screen by clicking the "...". Keep track of who votes where and USE THE SYSTEM. It's incredibly effective if you put some time into it. Save some cards in case you need them. If you ignore it you're inevitably going to get screwed by it at some point. Oh and for god's sake read the Zeitgeist cards. Zealotry can be game changing and so can Co-operation.

Well that was longer than I expected.

The second kind of person is the type that will buy this game and enjoy it because they aren't looking for MOO2 Remake #232432 and are willing to put some time in to truly appreciate its uniqueness. If you read this far without downvoting this review you're probably in the latter category. Bear in mind that this is by no means a perfect game, but it is certainly worth the money. I paid full price for this game, and that is not something I do very often.
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64 of 75 people (85%) found this review helpful
34.2 hrs on record
Posted: April 15
Star Ruler 2 Review

Star Ruler 2, a sequel to Blind Mind Studios' original Star Ruler game, is an ambitious endeavor that offers players a true 4X Space RTS experience on an enormous scale. For all of you Fleet Admirals, Squadron Commanders, X-Wing Aces, and Space Pirates who are thinking you've already been there and done that...guess again. Star Ruler 2 brings new dimensions to the sci-fi arena that will offer up exciting new challenges for even the most veteran strategy gamers.

In Star Ruler 2, players will choose a race and set out to conquer the galaxy by supreme domination. There are 7 basic races with their own unique bonuses and methods of space travel. Each race can be customized and since the game is extremely mod-friendly, its fair to say more races will likely be added by the community. Customization options range from choosing empire colors and logos to method of hyperspace travel and ship architectural style. Race bonuses can also be customized, basic ship styles can be modified, and even more can be added. In fact, most everything in this game can be changed. I did say this game is extremely mod-friendly.

After selecting your race, there are a number of additional options offered for generating your game before you begin and this is where Star Ruler 2 should start to really impress strategy veterans. There are a number of gaming options available to allow players to set victory conditions, resource scarcity, etc and even the size of your galaxy (referenced in system size and planetary frequency). Galaxies are then randomly generated and can range from a few dozen to a seemingly infinite number of planets based on the settings you select. But there's more. A ton of opponents can be added to your game both in single-player mode versus computer-controlled AI players and in multiplayer mode. According to Blind Mind, their custom designed Starflare Engine (built specifically to run this game) fully utilizes even multi-core cpu's so galaxies can be as big as you want up to your system's capabilities. After some experimentation of my own, I have no reason to think any different.

Another cool feature that makes Star Ruler 2 unique is how the galactic structure and planetary system works. The galaxy, regardless of size, is divided into a multitude of star systems and each system contains a number of planets and asteroids that revolve around the central star similar to how our own solar system works. The planets are random and some have added features or bonuses. All planets produce a type of resource and can be colonized, or populated, and planets can be upgraded to a maximum of five levels. Each planetary level will add more infrastructure and population. However, every level will require additional resources to be imported from other colonized planets forming a supportive network. Therefore, players must strategically choose which planets they want to further develop and decide what direction of development (also referred to as pressure) you want this planet to follow. Labor, income, or research pressures are primary examples and your planet's civilians will automatically construct production buildings to support the pressure type.

And that's just the beginning. There are many other cool features in Star Ruler 2. The space battles will be epic - thousands of ships involved in a single fight! Asteroids can be mined for precious minerals by building a mining base on them or deploying mining ships to harvest the resources. Planets can construct entire fleets of ships, an assortment of buildings for infrastructure, and a number of space structures such as defensive platforms, outposts or even an orbital ring around a planet that can be populated. Ships are assigned to groups for simpler control. They can all be customized and upgraded in numerous ways. Players can even design their own custom ships and add them to the game or share with the community. Through space exploration, players might discover artifacts that provide powerful benefits. The unique Diplomatic System of Star Ruler 2 is an extremely powerful tool that players will want to check out. The way the budget runs in three minute cycles before resetting as opposed to trickling into a gigantic resource pool is another dimension that makes the game different from all the others on a strategic level. And naturally, there is a wide assortment of research technologies to be learned and utilized. Don't forget the multiplayer cross-platform features and remember that the game is hot-wired for modding. Players can even access the community workshop mods through the game's easy-to-use interface.

Starting to get the idea? Star Ruler 2 is truly a grand strategy sci-fi adventure and offers numerous hours of gameplay with high replay value. The graphics will not blow you away, but they are solid and very well done. Zooming in using the fully rotating camera will reveal rich detailed graphics and everyone should enjoy the hyperspace jump sequence. The audio and soundtrack are quality and the overall user interface is very simple and easy to navigate. Time can be sped up or paused at will. There is a tutorial included so that players can quickly learn the basic game mechanics without being overwhelmed. Unfortunately there is no single-player campaign included though and don't expect any cut-scenes or voice-overs to provide any type of back story. The Star Ruler universe just simply is...

The Good:
+ Variety of races and abilities
+ Custom ship-building
+ Unique Diplomatic System that integrates into gameplay well
+ Large assortment of Researches
+ Tons of customization options
+ Quality Graphics & Sound
+ Single Player & Multiplayer modes
+ Simple controls and easy-to-use UI
+ Steam Trading Cards & Achievements
+ Extremely mod-friendly
+ High Replay Value
+ In-game access to Help, Wiki, & Workshop

+ Tutorial included
+ Auto-save w/ options[/i]

The Bad:
- Lack of a single-player campaign or storyline
- Research honeycomb is a cluttered mess/confusing
- Mouseovers for many options and settings do not display info

Final Thoughts:
Star Ruler 2 is one of the best 4X Space RTS games out there. With a few additional tweaks and components it could possibly become one of the best all-time. It offers numerous features and a unique style compared to similar games. From a strategic perspective, it offers players a multitude of options and will challenge players on most any difficulty setting. The graphics could probably be better but I feel that it was a conscious choice to scale them down a bit in order to allow for more players to be able to enjoy the game, particularly in multiplayer which is really what this game is built for, although it can still be a lot of fun in single-player mode. Whatever your preference, I strongly recommend this game to all space strategy fans!

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29 of 30 people (97%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
18.4 hrs on record
Posted: April 20
First of all, I'm a fan of 4x games. Now, I've somewhat strayed away from them over time; I've found a differing love for grand strat in the vein of Paradox games, specifically the economical and political ones such as Victoria 2. I ended up having a distaste for civ 5 and certain other new games (the endless bunch, etc) because they were just.. well, either too easy, or too messy. Several decent ideas wrapped in a gross tortilla, or something like that. I started to dislike how board-gamey they got to cater to the people who couldn't stand micro. I hadn't even really heard of Star Ruler 2(SR2) until earlier today, when I saw Scott Manley blow up a black hole. I pretty much bought it on the spot.

I've not played SR1.

Steam says I've played almost 8 hours of this game. An hour of that was in the tutorial and a 'practice' game I played, and the other seven hours were in a full game I did. The full game took place in two galaxies of 40 and 30 planets respectively, with myself and 4 AIs. I used a custom race.

I will go through each of what I feel are the main elements of a 4x game, rate them, compare them, and write criticisms.

--- The UI ---
Positives: One of the biggest dinks that most 4x games get- the user-friendliness of the UI. It is understandable, as pushing enough information to the user that's required can sometimes leave the UI cluttered, with too many buttons, too many numbers, etc.. SR2 does both extremely well and somewhat poorly in this regard, neutralizing out to it having a decent UI. The big pluses are fantastic- the game operates in a tabbed format with different types of windows, so if you want to have four tabs for your best planets, you can. You can customize your different views of the galaxy, zoom to them at will, etc- keep a tab open for research, keep a tab open for whatever you want, really. The quick-ui that shows fast info on the side of the screen is also fairly informative, and makes it easy to do things at a glance.

It also doesn't restrict much of what you can do, as you can affect the game using the UI (tethering planets for trade is one of the most important game mechanics as I will explain later, and you can tether a planet from its notice on the ui, for example). For what it does, the UI is extremely functional, and superior to its competitors. The built-in wiki that runs very well and the IRC to get quick help/talk to other players is also very nice, as while I may not want to play multiplayer at this time, I do still like talking to other players.

Negatives: On even a medium sized map, the UI gets extremely cluttered near the end of the game. You get lost in a sea of information that takes quite a while to discern exactly what you want to do. A lot of the 'resource icons' on planets are fairly small, so when I'm looking at 20 unused resources I seriously have to mouse over to see what each one is, unless it's something very easy to remember and see like water. There are quite a few resources, so I can't imagine how to fix this without shafting users with a lower resolution.

The technology grid is a chore. It's somewhat difficult at a glance to tell what is researched and what isn't, what is available and what is. It took me much longer than it should have to even find the starting point of the grid. In most other 4x games, even Distant Worlds, the research grid/chart is extremely easy to understand, though the actual contents of it may not be. Greying out techs you can't even possibly buy yet(but you can still mouse over for info) would be a huge step in the right direction. It's also sometimes hard to tell where the tech grid is going.. it will end up in weird places that aren't really logically conducive to itself. Overall, the grid isn't very nice to look at. I'm sure familiarization with it would help, but compared to something like Endless Legend which has a pretty good tech grid system, this is just a bit too ambiguous.

The technology grid has been redone to be easier to understand and find what you're looking for.

--- Core Mechanics ---

Just like every other 4x game, the core mechanics are to build your empire, strengthen your military, create a massive economy, protect your borders or crush your enemies, and be the dominant empire on the map. SR2 uses some traditional 4x systems (such as the building construction), some things of its own design, and things from other genres. The game, first of all, runs in real time. You can slow down, speed up, and pause the game. It is not the pseudo-realtime of Paradox games- it is true real time. Thankfully, everything happens slow enough at 1x speed that it is not much of an issue. The most imporatant part of the game is managing your resources, colonizing useful planets, leveling up your core worlds, and making economic powerhouses. The game REQUIRES expansion; you cannot support a huge economy by trade alone, and there is no way to turtle. I think it is one of the few games where I got to the end of my expansion and truly started eyeing my neighbors for what they have, rather than being content with my borders while being able to endlessly improve on itself. You 'tether' trade from worlds to other worlds, leveling them up by tethering a certain amount of resources to a specific world. For example, it takes merely food and water to level a planet up to level 1. After that, it requires more food to sustain the higher population, plus raw materials of some kind to create planetary 'production' which is reflected in a higher population, level, labour (production), and more things.

Each colonized planet has a single resource, and rarely two (typically one that it supplies to itself for free). Some resources have extra special effects, such as increasing research, influence (to be explained), or your 'energy'(also to be explained).

This leads to feeding all your expansion planets into one of your core worlds to make a few very powerful economic powerhouses; managing all your resources to efficiently make as many strong planets as possible to support a larger military and production base. No longer can one create a Venice and protect it only; you MUST keep your logisitical supply lanes protected, as one lost system can break your whole economic structure down and require a full restructuring. This is the core, and the essence of the game. It reminds me very dsitinctly of the Anno series, though you do not specifically need certain resources to enhance planets.

Although you may find yourself strained for resources, there are ways to increase your number of planets without conquest. There are a few 'relic' type things scattered around the map which let you do things like create new stars, new planets, etc etc. There are lots of cool things. Using one of these requires energy, which is gained via research and resources. Energy is simply a 'mana' type substance which is used to activate these abilities and certain extra special abilities ships have that can be equipped later via technology, such as blink. These types of abilities are very cool, and you definitely start to feel like an interstellar god as your empire grows bigger.
Construction is based on the civilian sector. Much like Distant Worlds, you, as a federal government, have little control over your civilian sector. It automatically constructs cities and improvements on your planets as long as you supply them correctly. There are buildings you can put on planets which are expensive and cost upkeep, but for the most part, civilians and the AI take care of everything on the surface. Orbital space stations are player-built, at least.

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26 of 26 people (100%) found this review helpful
103.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 11
This is an utterly stellar game (pun... partially intended). It's hard to express in a brief review what this game does and how well it does it, but suffice to say, it delivers on every promise it makes in the store page breakdown. It takes the basic 4X formula, then does so many innovative little things with it that I never once had another 4X game in my mind. As bold as it is in this regard, everything it changes WORKS, and oh so well.

I'm really at a loss for how to properly lay out this review, so I'll refer you to some other users' reviews and instead touch on some of the highlights for me personally. It'll get long-winded, so if you want a summary, here it is: Star Ruler 2 is a spectacular game, both for 4X fans and sci-fi fans in general. Even RTS fans are like to find appeal. If you're on the fence, thinking, "Well it looks good, but I dunnooooo...", my advice is get it. I was, I did, and I'm not sorry.

Now, to the point-by-point breakdown:

- The hex-based ship design is way more fun than I'd have imagined. It really makes every ship "count". It attaches you to your creations. Furthermore, the design MATTERS. It's more than just racking up numbers and min/maxing; the combat in Star Ruler 2 actually simulates physical interactions between ships, meaning you have to take care to lay out your ship in a way that protects vital subsystems without sacrificing too much in the way of firepower and maneuvering.

- The fleet system is just so great. Where most games force you to tediously build every single ship by hand and then group 4 to 12 of them to call it a "fleet", Star Ruler 2 centers fleets around one (often expensive) flagship, and has hundreds of smaller support craft attached to it. Each individual ship acts on its own in battle, but as a part of the whole the is the fleet. it's awe-inspiring to watch, and it somehow doesn't break my system, either!

- One of my favorite features regarding ships is the ability to set a size. You input a size when designing ships, and that size scales everything from the health offered by each hex to the amount of damage your weapons inflict and your armor soaks.

Even more impressive is that the ships ACTUALLY scale, physically, with the number you input. I was shocked when I made a copy of a size 500 battleship and set it to 5,000 as a test, to find it turned out to be bigger than the SUN. Given that you can make orbital battle stations and the like, you can literally build a Death Star; a hulking behemoth with over 8 million HP. (I am not exaggerating one bit; of course, this is if your empire can afford such a thing.)

- For those who fancy ship creation and simply watching battles, there's a ship designer sandbox that allows you to create anything your heart desires, ignoring cost and all else, and spawn it in open space as an ally or enemy. If you just feel like watching ten massive fleets of your creation duke it out without all the 4X fluff, you can do that.

- Empire management is meaningful. Where other 4X games just have you taking a planet and letting it get bloated with population to become a big producer of the major resources, Star Ruler 2 forces you to think. Planets require certain resources to grow, and these are supplied as exports from other planets. But a planet can only export a resource to one place. This means you have to really pour resources from several planets into one key planet, rather than just sitting idle while everything grows to insane proportions.

- The 4X resources - in this case, things like wealth, influence, FTL charge, energy and research - aren't automatically produced based on abstract values attached to a planet. In general, they require pressure. Each planet can handle so much pressure, and pressure tells the planet what to produce. It's hard to explain... Here's an example. Electronics generate wealth pressure, because if electronics are being imported to a planet, this means they're being sold as a consumer product. That leads to sales tax revenue. In other words, the types of luxury resources a planet has, either natively or by export, drive the production of the major resources in your empire. It's a novel and very fun mechanic to play with.

- Diplomacy matters! Influence is a resource you can generate, and you use it to pick up diplomacy cards or to play cards you possess. You can play these cards for a variety of effects, from spying on other empires to giving your flagship a name, but one key way you spend many of the cards is in diplomatic events. These are events that pop up, either organically or when played by another empire, and affect every empire equally. However, there are boons both for the empire who placed the most votes in favor of the motion and to the one who placed the most opposed votes, depending on whether the motion ends up passing or failing.

These are often significant bonuses, and thus it can be worth going after them, plus there's the matter of the actual policy being voted upon and the outcome you desire for it. It becomes a tug of war for votes one way or the other before time expires on the vote, and you can either spend Influence to cast votes with certain cards, or you can offer gifts to empires who supply at least a given number of votes for or against the motion, according to your request. It's fascinating little minigame that makes the political side of the game fun and engaging.

- The creation of races is pretty fun as well, and not extremely time consuming even if you want to bring in custom portraits and flags. The latter is simply a matter of dropping PNG images in the appropriate folders. The rest is a matter of choosing options for your civilization using a point-buy system. Similar to customization in the Endless 4X games. What makes it feel cooler, however, is the fact that you get two very specific types of options that feel like they have a pretty big impact as opposed to the options in similar systems: government and FTL method. Your choice of government dictates several starting bonuses for your empire, and certain choices will even affect your play style for the rest of the game. FTL method is something I'd never have thought of myself; you pick how your race achieves faster than light travel. You can build gates that allow fleets to jump between them, similar to the FTL in Mass Effect lore, you can have your race build standard old jump drives, tear holes in time and space to achieve instantaneous travel... Or, for a huge increase in points to spend on other aspects of your civilization, you can say you haven't even achieved FTL travel.

There are several more things, and I could rant all day, but this review has already gone on far longer than I'd have liked. The summary: Star Ruler 2 innovates the genre in an astounding way, and is proving to be the most fun I've had with a 4X game since Civilization was a new series to me. It's a breath of fresh air that I feel is precisely what this genre needed. I've owned the game for around 20 hours and have been playing for nearly half of those; I can easily see myself playing for 150 more.
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28 of 31 people (90%) found this review helpful
101.8 hrs on record
Posted: May 21
Star Ruler 2 is a really good game. Although it is real time the speed can be slowed down so as to handle things nicely. Colonies level up real well, just connect food + water and maybe some resources and good to go. It is a nice looking game with decent graphics for the small size of the game (600 MB). The technology tree is varied and fun to explore - every tech makes a nice difference. Diplomacy is great! There are cards to play and votes to influence. Ship design is fun and highly recommended to get the best ships built. Watching the battles is a blast!

Global resources include Influence for diplomacy, Energy for artifacts, Money for buying things, and Research for new technologies. There are all slightly different in how they work and are handled very well. There is not a lot of micromanagement in the game, just enough to keep a player busy just right. This is a good game design. The AI is fun to fight.

I have played many space 4x games in the past 30 years and Star Ruler 2 is one of the very best!
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