MASSIVE CHALICE is a tactical strategy game set on an epic timeline from Double Fine Productions. As the Immortal Ruler of the nation, you'll take command of its heroes, forge heroic marriages to strengthen your Bloodlines, and battle a mysterious enemy known as the Cadence in a 300 year war.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (17 reviews) - 82% of the 17 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Mostly Positive (957 reviews) - 70% of the 957 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Jun 1, 2015

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Reviews

“I couldn’t wait to see this century-spanning adventure through to the end”
8/10 – Game Informer

“A demanding and ingenious twist on turn-based strategy sees Double Fine back at its best”
Recommended – Eurogamer

“...there’s a whole lot filling up this goblet of goodness”
5/5 – Twinfinite

About This Game

MASSIVE CHALICE is a tactical strategy game set on an epic timeline from Double Fine Productions. As the Immortal Ruler of the Nation, you'll take command of its heroes, forge marriages to strengthen your Bloodlines, and battle a mysterious enemy known as the Cadence in a war lasting hundreds of years.

Key Features

  • Bloodline Genetics - MASSIVE CHALICE features an innovative Bloodline system that allows the player to marry heroes together to produce children. The Bloodline system uses a randomized genetic code for every hero. Their children can end up with the best (or worst!) gameplay-impacting traits of their parents.
  • Permadeath - The heroes in MASSIVE CHALICE age over the course of the timeline and eventually pass away. This forces the player to engage in the beauty of permadeath and always juggle an imperfect party of heroes with which to do battle!
  • Bloodline Relics - If a hero has fought valiantly enough when they inevitably pass away, their weapon has a chance to become a Bloodline Relic. This powerful Relic can be passed down to any character of the same house in order to carry on the legacy of the fallen hero!
  • Long View Strategy - Because the war lasts 300 years, players need to take a long view of their strategy. Decisions have to be made dozens of years in advance and long-term planning is incredibly important. That 3-year-old toddler is going to grow up to be your most reliable melee fighter sooner than you think!

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz dual core CPU
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 256 MB GeForce 8800, Radeon 3850, or Intel HD 3000 Graphics
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, or AMD Athlon 64 at 2.2 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB GeForce 220, Radeon 4550, Intel HD 4000 Graphics
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
    Minimum:
    • OS: Snow Leopard 10.6.8, or later
    • Processor: Intel Core Duo
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: ATI HD 2600 / NVIDIA 8800GT / Intel HD3000 or better card with at least 256 MB VRAM
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Snow Leopard 10.6.8, or later
    • Processor: Intel Core i series processor
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: ATI HD 4670 / Nvidia 285 or better with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 13.04 LTS, fully updated
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz dual core CPU
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 256 MB GeForce 8800, Radeon HD 2000, or Intel HD 4000 Graphics
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Very Positive (17 reviews)
Overall:
Mostly Positive (957 reviews)
Recently Posted
One Eye Whisky Dan
( 0.5 hrs on record )
Posted: June 27
I'm going to give this a condtional 'no' vote.

My big issue is that the game is optimized terribly. My computer more than exceeds the recommended system requirements, but the game is so poorly optimized that the game runs like old timey stop motion. We're talking single digit frame rate.

If Double Fine ever decides to update this game and actually make it run well, then you should pick it up. A classic example of great idea ruined by crappy QA.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Phii
( 63.0 hrs on record )
Posted: June 27
Really enjoyed playing Massive Chalice!
It's an interesting concept.
Time loses meaning for you, but not for your heroes. Thanks to your imortality you can see both the small and the big picture. Furthermore, you have to face the consequences of the choices you made decades before. I really like that aspect of it.
+ the game has a good replay value!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
crickit90
( 107.2 hrs on record )
Posted: June 23
Do you like fantasy games? Do you like turn based strategy? Do you enjoy tactical positioning? Are you a fan of leveling systems with customizable skills? Do you enjoy dealing with random chance? Would you like to breed a family of superheroes? Would it be entertaining if their bloodline developed heart disease or alcoholism because they are people too? Would you like to manage the development of a small kingdom that feels like a board game inserted into all of this? Then this game is for you, buy it. If you aren't convinced, wait for it to go on sale ($10 is a great deal for it).

A good friend of mine played this right up to the 300 year marker, but then lost because his heroic bloodlines went infertile around year 250. No one was left for the final confrontation. I got a kick out of that.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Alitari
( 18.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 20
TLDR it looks nice, it plays fairly well, and it's unforgiving on the easiest level. Think niche XCOM.

It's a good game but it is missing a few things that seem to me to be odd ... first off, there is no option for any of the characters to 'hold' their action until something comes into range / sight. Either you attack it on your turn or you don't at all ... there's no 'overwatch'. Further, it's not clear what the ranges of various non-melee weapons are, so it's hard to tell if, when you move to a location, whether or not you'll be able to hit something. Finally, it keeps the camera at a 45 degree angle and rotates 90 degrees from there, but some actions, like Charge, can be performed on all 8 compass points, so it's hard to line things up. Finally, even on Regular mode, the game is unforgiving and sometimes feels like the RNG gods just have it out for you.

I wish there was more of a choice as to which heroes were involved with which events, so you could send a promising young character out on a quest rather than it seemingly randomly picking a hero for you to use.

Graphically it has a beautiful style, both in combat and between combats, and it doesn't take too long to play through the full 300 year campaign.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
anonagon
( 14.7 hrs on record )
Posted: June 18
This game is an excellent tactics RPG.

The complaint you'll likely see from many negative reviews is that you have to cycle through heroes too much, preventing you from getting attached and preventing meaningful progression. Those people obviously didn't understand the games central mechanic. The hero churn is one of the BEST things about the game. The major form of progression in the game is not individual heroes, but rather their bloodlines. I didn't get attached to any particular heroes, but I can sure tell you that House Thorne and their relic weapon, called Fear, won me many a battle. This game is full of interesting choices about how to best develop your bloodlines, and managing them is where the real meat of the strategy side of the game lies.

The tactics side of the game is fairly simple, but elegant and satisfying. There are three starting classes that mix through the miracle of childbirth to make up to 9 classes. The opposition consists of 7 different types of enemies, and advanced forms of those 7. Most of these enemies have unique gimmicks, some of them playing into the macro-strategy side of the game. Battles happen every 10-20 years, and they remained fun for me all the way through the game.

If there's any real problem with the game, its that it kind of feels repetitive, and it doesn't really build up to its ending. All 300 years feel mostly the same. I feel like the game really wants me to take what I've learned on my first playthrough and apply it to the harder difficulties, but a playthough takes too long for that to really feel reasonable. This game could have really benefitted from each playthrough being shorter, but really I think the game is worth playing anyway.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
paradoxic4
( 3.7 hrs on record )
Posted: June 18
Easily one of the best games I've played in a long time. It's unique, interesting, and fun. If you like XCOM, you will like this too.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Darth Araknus
( 19.4 hrs on record )
Posted: June 17
One of best tactical strategy game. Good graphics and interesting mechanics.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
biasedeyes
( 33.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 15
Product received for free
As I made my way through the 300 years it takes to charge the chalice, I was originally planning to write a cautious positive review. This game deserves some praise for the solid mechanics it demonstrates. They make the game fun, even through plodding self-insert writing, repetitive gameplay, and general lack of refinement in several aspects of the game. I'd planned to say that the game was good, and would have been great, if only polished more. Unfortunately, after finishing, I find myself unable to give this recommendation.

For context, everything in the game builds towards the charging of the chalice. You send crack teams of five controllable heros out to occasional battles, and decide the research, intercourse and economy of an upper class of those 'attuned to the chalice' in a nation beset by a sinister enemy, the Cadence. The rest of the time, you 'sleep'. The game builds the chalice as a mystical power, with dialogue-based time shenanigans and curative powers that spice up the 300 year wait.

These 3 choice dialogues were actually a very necessary respite for the tedium of waiting 300 years, going through battles that because of the mildly varied but still quite limited classes and locations soon became a bit repetitive.

So naturally, I expected something special for the final battle. Perhaps being able to use all of my heros in an epic final stand, or, going off the time shenanigans earlier, being able to choose my heros from all of those who'd passed away as well as those alive. So, I was somewhat disappointed that the selection was made normally. It turned out that there actually was something different about the final battle, the enemy attempted to attack the 500HP chalice instead of your heros, something that actually made it easier. Oh well, I'd been playing on normal, so perhaps it would have been more epic on greater difficulty. Dispatch the last of the enemies and... done!

Only, the ending was a disappointment. A flop on the visual, emotional, and writing level. Not much worse than the starting cutscene, but after 300 years... you expect something a bit more. Drama, a last look at your kingdom, something. There *was* a grand reveal, but so hamhanded that it had very little impact, and didn't make the half-day that playing the game through takes worthwhile.

So I retried the game on brutal hardcore difficulty, though it's worth noting that I never restored from save on my first game. Long story short, my heart was no longer in it. The whole game builds toward the end, and since I now knew that was no great shakes, it was just a slog. I made it maybe 50 years before my alchemists blew up, and even though I very well might persist, I no longer felt it.

TL;DR Brilliant idea, but disappointing.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Charybdian
( 2.0 hrs on record )
Posted: June 4
Double Fine's inventive take on turn-based strategy with rogulike elements is reminiscent of X-COM with a twist in the form of lineage. Players alternate between managing their empire on a broad scale and taking part in tactical battles against a horde of enemies known as the Cadence. Between these skirmishes, players assign researchers to develop new technologies and regents to manage outposts. These regents have families, and depending on the traits of the regent and their spouse, their offspring will exhibit shared traits.

Which is excellent in theory. Each regent will train their offspring in one of three different main classes: Blastcapper, Alchemist, and Hunter. The Blastcapper carries around a wildly practical battering ram, which to their credit can actually do some damage and is useful for breaching doors that don't exist anywhere in the game. Unfortunately, these heroes cease to be useful or practical heroes almost immediately.

In one of the first matches against our eternal foe, the game introduces a new enemy that will run up and gleefully explode next to any of your heroes. Not only that, it leaves behind a toxic residue that saps health and armor at the start of every turn. In every subsequent match except one, this enemy appeared. This wouldn't be a problem if all of my heroes weren't nearsighted inbreds that can barely function on the battlefield. More than half of the enemies I encountered were these blitzing bombers, so doing the sensical thing and trying to lead with the strong melee class was useless since they kept getting hit by explosives.

The second class, the suicide bomber, has an acceptable melee attack but their claim to fame are the explosive flasks they lob at the enemy. Yes, those 5 flasks your bold hero starts off with will serve them well on their journey: two flasks to roast their teammates, two to fling blindly off cliffs or so far away from the enemy as to be useless, and one to hit a single enemy yet fail to kill it. Even if the teamkilling allstar is sitting directly on top of the enemy, they may only have a 70% chance to hit, and chances are they'll just fail and do their lineage a service through self-immolation. Even if they could hit anything, their maximum range is atrocious and as mentioned before, the kingdom is inhabited by a very proud yet blind people so enemies will pop out of the mist and blindside you regularly.

Last but certainly not least, the Hunter. A ranged fighter equipped with a giant crossbow, the only useful class has unlimited ammunition, the largest range, and can use stealth to scout and reveal enemies before striking. The only downside to this class is that the tutorial doesn't expressly mention that once you assign a regent that blind idiot family will never stop popping out melee brawlers and only melee brawlers.

The other classes appear to have interesting skills further down the line, but your heros are far too frail and inept when faced with the supercharged enemy roster. Aside from the basic enemy minion, each foe has far more unique skills to help them survive than your elite warriors. The first ranged enemy not only deals damage from long range but sucks experience points from your heroes. Those delightful exploding fiends deal heavy damage in an area, and if a hero happens to stand in the residual gunk they suffer huge penalties. There is also a ranged enemy with piercing attacks that can toughen their hide to drastically reduce damage. It feels as though all the really neat abilities are reserved for your enemies, and I couldn't help but start rooting for them after a few matches.

If the thought of watching generations of people grow and produce unique heroes is appealing, Massive Chalice will deliver. The tactical combat feels shallow and frustrating at times, though after slugging through several relentless bouts with inept heroes, who knows; one of them just might hit something.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Trebora
( 4.7 hrs on record )
Posted: June 1
Would reign for 300 years killing just as many heroes again 10/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
57 of 64 people (89%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
33.8 hrs on record
Posted: June 15
Product received for free
As I made my way through the 300 years it takes to charge the chalice, I was originally planning to write a cautious positive review. This game deserves some praise for the solid mechanics it demonstrates. They make the game fun, even through plodding self-insert writing, repetitive gameplay, and general lack of refinement in several aspects of the game. I'd planned to say that the game was good, and would have been great, if only polished more. Unfortunately, after finishing, I find myself unable to give this recommendation.

For context, everything in the game builds towards the charging of the chalice. You send crack teams of five controllable heros out to occasional battles, and decide the research, intercourse and economy of an upper class of those 'attuned to the chalice' in a nation beset by a sinister enemy, the Cadence. The rest of the time, you 'sleep'. The game builds the chalice as a mystical power, with dialogue-based time shenanigans and curative powers that spice up the 300 year wait.

These 3 choice dialogues were actually a very necessary respite for the tedium of waiting 300 years, going through battles that because of the mildly varied but still quite limited classes and locations soon became a bit repetitive.

So naturally, I expected something special for the final battle. Perhaps being able to use all of my heros in an epic final stand, or, going off the time shenanigans earlier, being able to choose my heros from all of those who'd passed away as well as those alive. So, I was somewhat disappointed that the selection was made normally. It turned out that there actually was something different about the final battle, the enemy attempted to attack the 500HP chalice instead of your heros, something that actually made it easier. Oh well, I'd been playing on normal, so perhaps it would have been more epic on greater difficulty. Dispatch the last of the enemies and... done!

Only, the ending was a disappointment. A flop on the visual, emotional, and writing level. Not much worse than the starting cutscene, but after 300 years... you expect something a bit more. Drama, a last look at your kingdom, something. There *was* a grand reveal, but so hamhanded that it had very little impact, and didn't make the half-day that playing the game through takes worthwhile.

So I retried the game on brutal hardcore difficulty, though it's worth noting that I never restored from save on my first game. Long story short, my heart was no longer in it. The whole game builds toward the end, and since I now knew that was no great shakes, it was just a slog. I made it maybe 50 years before my alchemists blew up, and even though I very well might persist, I no longer felt it.

TL;DR Brilliant idea, but disappointing.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
8 of 11 people (73%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
107.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 23
Do you like fantasy games? Do you like turn based strategy? Do you enjoy tactical positioning? Are you a fan of leveling systems with customizable skills? Do you enjoy dealing with random chance? Would you like to breed a family of superheroes? Would it be entertaining if their bloodline developed heart disease or alcoholism because they are people too? Would you like to manage the development of a small kingdom that feels like a board game inserted into all of this? Then this game is for you, buy it. If you aren't convinced, wait for it to go on sale ($10 is a great deal for it).

A good friend of mine played this right up to the 300 year marker, but then lost because his heroic bloodlines went infertile around year 250. No one was left for the final confrontation. I got a kick out of that.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
16 of 29 people (55%) found this review helpful
Recommended
23.0 hrs on record
Posted: May 29
A lot of what is said in reviews is spot on and even more is complete and total ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥t...


Balance: Flawless. People saying they loved XCOM EU/EW and hate this game because "it isn't balanced" is hilarious ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥t. Massive Chalice does a better job at getting me to bring one of each unique class into each battle than any other tactical game I have played. You have a melee class, a grenadier style class, and a ranged class as you three base classes and then merging bloodline will create hybrids. Having one of each base class was a must for me playing and I enjoyed it.

Story: Decent. This is made better with the fantastic voice acting and great visuals. This is yet another claim that boggles my mind- that the "story is boring and XCOM is better". The "story" was by FAR the weakest part of XCOM, "aliens are here, kill them, they only have one master ship, kill it". If you are playing either of these two games for "the story" you are in the wrong genre friend...

Combat: Decent. This one is true. Other tactical games (such as XCOM EW/EU as well as Divinity Original Sin) have produced a much more solid combat experience. Every fight is on a flat surface with elevation never being introduced. Some games (like Divinity) get away with their fights being only on one surface but it can be felt in this game. There is enough tactical fun and content here to make combat fun and thought provoking but not enough depth or inovations for it to be a selling feature.

Bloodlines: Great. This one has not been done well in any other tactical game save for some Fire Emblem games (which have even LESS tactical combat) and it has been done well here. Relics that get passed down bloodlines and playing "game of thrones" with regents is great. This is a huge selling feature for this game, if it does not interest you then buying the game would most likely be a mistake.

Length: Weak. Each "generation" needs to be 4x as long with 4x as many battles. You can beat the game in 15-20 hours. This is (IMO) the single greatest problem with the game- the combat was never a selling feature (IMO) for the game and didn't need that much more content (if any) but the world size as well as content feels lacking. It is a shame that mods were never really a deal as a "Long War" mod for this game I would frankly enjoy far more than on XCOM EU...

Tower Defense: Weak. I add this in as well even though combat doesn't reflect a "tower defense" style of play the "defending the heart of your country as things come in from the borders" style of play is present in the "world view" aspect of the game. I am a huge fan of "no lost countries" and would never, EVER lose a single country in XCOM- that CANNOT happen in this game. This game is a "hold out long enough to win" style of game with countries/areas that will fall regardless of your actions. I hate this, it would be the first thing I mod out or at least give some way/option to fight to retake it (like in XCOM LW).


Overall: You want a decent turn based tactical game with country management and bloodline control there is nothing better on the market. If you want pure tactical combat with nil story and nil country management and nil bloodline control then this isn't for you. If you are somewhere inbetween then I would still recommend, I would just suggest picking it up on sale.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
63.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 27
Really enjoyed playing Massive Chalice!
It's an interesting concept.
Time loses meaning for you, but not for your heroes. Thanks to your imortality you can see both the small and the big picture. Furthermore, you have to face the consequences of the choices you made decades before. I really like that aspect of it.
+ the game has a good replay value!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
14.7 hrs on record
Posted: June 18
This game is an excellent tactics RPG.

The complaint you'll likely see from many negative reviews is that you have to cycle through heroes too much, preventing you from getting attached and preventing meaningful progression. Those people obviously didn't understand the games central mechanic. The hero churn is one of the BEST things about the game. The major form of progression in the game is not individual heroes, but rather their bloodlines. I didn't get attached to any particular heroes, but I can sure tell you that House Thorne and their relic weapon, called Fear, won me many a battle. This game is full of interesting choices about how to best develop your bloodlines, and managing them is where the real meat of the strategy side of the game lies.

The tactics side of the game is fairly simple, but elegant and satisfying. There are three starting classes that mix through the miracle of childbirth to make up to 9 classes. The opposition consists of 7 different types of enemies, and advanced forms of those 7. Most of these enemies have unique gimmicks, some of them playing into the macro-strategy side of the game. Battles happen every 10-20 years, and they remained fun for me all the way through the game.

If there's any real problem with the game, its that it kind of feels repetitive, and it doesn't really build up to its ending. All 300 years feel mostly the same. I feel like the game really wants me to take what I've learned on my first playthrough and apply it to the harder difficulties, but a playthough takes too long for that to really feel reasonable. This game could have really benefitted from each playthrough being shorter, but really I think the game is worth playing anyway.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: June 27
I'm going to give this a condtional 'no' vote.

My big issue is that the game is optimized terribly. My computer more than exceeds the recommended system requirements, but the game is so poorly optimized that the game runs like old timey stop motion. We're talking single digit frame rate.

If Double Fine ever decides to update this game and actually make it run well, then you should pick it up. A classic example of great idea ruined by crappy QA.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
5 of 9 people (56%) found this review helpful
Recommended
12.6 hrs on record
Posted: May 29
Don't listen to the naysayers. Massive Chalice is strange, quirky, interesting, and one of a kind.

It's get compared to X-Com, and that is not in itself wrong, but it feels completely different. LIke X-Com, you have both the Strategic Layer, and the Tactical Turn Based combat system. The difference is the scale is much more massive. You are playing an imortal ruler and the game takes place over 300 years, with each fight taking place often decades after the last ones. This means while your heroes level up and gain skills like an RPG, you aren't really leveling them up. You are leveling up their bloodline.

That's the unique thing here. You can build keeps and then retire two of your heroes from battle to establish a bloodline. They won't fight any more and can't normally level up any further, but they will pass on their experience and levels to their children as well as various personalities and traits. You can also pull heroes from the field to be trainers, further boosting their xp and augmenting their traits and to increase your reseach.

As your heroes only get to fight one or two battles before they grow old and die, it's all about getting them up a few levels, retiring them to pass that knowledge on to the next generation, and engineering a class of heroes with the best traits and abilities.

There's a few more thing, but that's the gist of it. Go in treating it like a typical combat game with RPG elements and you will get frustrated. Treat it like the completely unique thing that it is, and you will enjoy it.
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2 of 4 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
18.8 hrs on record
Posted: June 20
TLDR it looks nice, it plays fairly well, and it's unforgiving on the easiest level. Think niche XCOM.

It's a good game but it is missing a few things that seem to me to be odd ... first off, there is no option for any of the characters to 'hold' their action until something comes into range / sight. Either you attack it on your turn or you don't at all ... there's no 'overwatch'. Further, it's not clear what the ranges of various non-melee weapons are, so it's hard to tell if, when you move to a location, whether or not you'll be able to hit something. Finally, it keeps the camera at a 45 degree angle and rotates 90 degrees from there, but some actions, like Charge, can be performed on all 8 compass points, so it's hard to line things up. Finally, even on Regular mode, the game is unforgiving and sometimes feels like the RNG gods just have it out for you.

I wish there was more of a choice as to which heroes were involved with which events, so you could send a promising young character out on a quest rather than it seemingly randomly picking a hero for you to use.

Graphically it has a beautiful style, both in combat and between combats, and it doesn't take too long to play through the full 300 year campaign.
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Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
586 of 718 people (82%) found this review helpful
14 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
6.7 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: May 22, 2015
Massive Chalice combines recent X-Com combat with a hero breeding system. When I first read about it I was really interested and excited, but only after a few hours, I came to the conclusion, that there is no life in this game.

Let me explain that a little:

The combat: An immersive game cant be shallow. If you played the recent X-Com titles you will have noticed that they watered down the combat compared to the old titles. Massive Chalice has a watered down recent X-Com combat system. It lacks any strategy, if you ask me. There is no flanking, no useful cover system. In the end, you will only care about the swiftest way to wipe away your enemies. And when it comes to wiping out, you will mostly care for the highest damage. I don't feel any synergy between the classes.

Home/map screen: While waiting for the fast forward function to pop up any events, the game feels lifeless. Nothing will happen. Your map does not live. You wont see any changes in your nation within a hundred of years. While I do not care for graphic quality, I care for visuals. I do not like to stare at a lifeless map for a huge amount of time. This lifelessness continues:

Research/castle: You have the possibility to research new stuff. Weapons, armors, items, whatever. The visuals for that are not appealing. They are mostly symbols and text. Some areas actually show a nice background, which helps your kingdom come alive, but mostly you will look at text and symbols. Spacebase DF-9 had a similar system, which is really not appealing.

Levels: The levels are mostly tiny arenas or tunnel-like maps where you have to fight the Cadence. Combined with the shallow combat, this will rapidly feel like heavy repetition. No map is unique, nor interesting. Its always about search and destroy. In some events, you have to defend a castle and protect your breeders. There, you will fight in their castles. Man, those castles feel so dead, I would rather just jump down the castle tower. Everything is grey, lifeless, looks like a maze. Where are those libraries, dining rooms, stables, whatever? May be they are there and I just did not see them, but especially the castle maps do not look appealing. Depressing, to be honest.

Death: Permadeath is great. That makes every decision important. But with all those deaths, with all this loss, there should be a place to worship your most important resource. At a certain point, I stopped caring about what color the heroes wear, wether they are male or female, which banner they carry. At a certain point, it was all about stats. They are a resource and that made me feel pretty lonely. No bonding to any fictional character. No caring for any hero. No favorite. I know that this not really avoidable, but there should be a way to truly honor and remember my heroes. Make them come alive for the short duration they will be with you.

The Chalice, the voices: The voice acting is pretty good. I like it, but it wears off just too fast. The two talkers start to repeat themselves early and that is counter-immersive. Also: Since they are no persons, but a massive chalice, I felt pretty alone in the game. I could not bond with them, because they had no visuals I could stick to, no interaction. Nothing.

In sum, it may sound a little drastic to some, but Massive Chalice was only entertaining for a short duration of time. The rest was depressing. It felt shallow, trivial and lonely so many times in my short duration of game time. With no avatar, no continuing visible NPCs, no bonding with your brood, no life in the castle on the map, I felt like I entered a world of nothingness. Cold lonely nothingness. With two voices in my head, that kept entertaining each other like a dark circus show, somewhere in a lifeless void, doing the same old trick over and over and over again.

I am sorry, but ~20€ or whatever the price may be now is way too much money for this game. I can not recommend buying it unless you enjoy mind numbness, not caring for your party/characters, hollow design, 7 different enemies throughout the whole game and ... so ... on.
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Not Recommended
28.5 hrs on record
Posted: June 16, 2015
More like Massive Disappointment. This feels more like the start of an Early Access game rather than the end of it. Edited for clarification, and typos. It's not that this is a bad game per se, so much as there are better games at the same price point.

I'll keep this short. I typically play on easy for those of you who actually care.

Pro: The Generation concept is neat.

Neutral: Apparently, if you make it past Year 150 'Advanced' enemies make the game more fun. This was not my experience, but if you like watching your heroes suffer increasingly horrible odds to placate a giant talking goblet, more power to you.

Con: Due to the gameplay, if you don't get the baby train rolling immediately, you lose. Between age, 'traits' (Infertile), and combat, time is a far greater threat than the Cadence could ever hope to be.

Con: You can breed, and you can fight. That's it. Despite the simplicity, Double Fine somehow managed to make the combat both incredibly boring and frustrating. Try not to get attached to your people.

Con: Startling lack of endgame content. You've seen everything Massive Chalice has to offer by year 150 or so. The enemies have different varitions, there are hybrid classes (which mix/combine class skills and armor appearance).
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