With Wasteland 2, the impressive lineage of the series has been preserved but modernized for the fans of today. Immerse yourself in tactical turn-based combat, RPG-style character advancement and customization, and deep choices that affect the narrative and memorable cast of characters.
User reviews: Very Positive (4,936 reviews)
Release Date: Sep 18, 2014

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Recommended By Curators

"An excellent RPG despite its glitches, with combat and writing as good as its predecessors'."
Read the full review here.

Recent updates View all (26)

May 19

Kickstarter Update #62: Two Weeks to Bard’s Tale IV; Quirking It Up

Greetings Exiles,

In this new Kickstarter update, we take a look at the upcoming Quirks feature in the Wasteland 2 Game of the Year Edition, along with a glimpse at our updated character creation process and some of our new user interface.

For the full details, check the update!

9 comments Read more

May 7

Game of the Year Edition Coming Free to All Owners

Greetings, Exiles,

A big announcement for all of you who have supported us from the start, but before we jump into that we wanted to let you know we are in the final stretches of preparing our Kickstarter for our next big game, The Bard’s Tale IV. If you loved Wasteland 2, nothing speaks more to that than continuing to support our independence in making these types of games, and we’d love to have you back! You can sign up to get an alert when we launch the Bard’s Tale campaign over on our official website. And now on to our big news…

You may have caught word of our plans to release Wasteland 2 Game of the Year Edition on PC platforms, as well as Xbox One and PlayStation 4 - and if you haven't, you can check out some tidbits on the PlayStation blog, or watch the Xbox One or PS4 trailer. But while that's all well and good, we've been asked by many of our backers and fans over the last months: what about those that made Wasteland 2 a reality in the first place, or previously purchased the game?

We’re very happy to announce that the Game of the Year Edition will be coming as a FREE UPDATE to all owners of Wasteland 2 on Windows, Mac or Linux. Whether an original backer, a late backer or someone who purchased the game later on, we will be providing Wasteland 2 Game of the Year Edition as an upgrade to your PC version of the game, available to you when it launches in late summer of this year!

Wasteland 2 Game of the Year Edition will include a huge set of improvements on the original game. The game will be making the jump to Unity 5, the latest version of the Unity game engine, and benefits from updated environment textures, completely redone character models, and Physically Based Rendering for more impressive lighting. We’ve added a ton of new voice-over to enrich the game's cast of characters, including your trusted companions. And you can also look forward to updates to the character system, combat, and game balancing as well.

For the full update and brand-new GOTY Edition screenshots, check out our Kickstarter page:

71 comments Read more

Reviews

“This really does feel like Fallout 4, if Fallout were to go back to its CRPG roots.”
TotalBiscuit/The Cynical Brit

“Along with Bard's Tale, Wasteland was one of the games that made me want to make games. I was privileged that Brian gave me the opportunity to work on Fallout, and I have missed those games. Getting to play Wasteland 2 is like getting to return to your past and finding out that it is still as fun as you remember.”
Feargus Urquhart/CEO Obsidian & Lead Designer Fallout 2

“InXile can be really proud. Not only did they pave the Kickstarter road for CRPGs, they over-delivered with the end result and crafted a rich experience which will keep me busy for a long time.”
Swen Vincke/Creative Director of Divinity: Original Sin

Classic Edition

  • A free copy of Wasteland 1 - The Original Classic.
  • Mark Morgan's Wasteland 2 original sound track in digital format.
  • An incredible digital concept art book showcasing many of the world's characters and environments.

The extras can be found in your Steam installation location for Wasteland 2. (e.g. C:\Program Files\Steam\SteamApps\common\Wasteland 2)

Digital Deluxe Edition

  • A free copy of Wasteland 1 - The Original Classic.
  • A free copy of The Bard's Tale.
  • Three digital novellas set in The Wasteland world.
  • Mark Morgan's Wasteland 2 original sound track in digital format.
  • An incredible digital concept art book showcasing many of the world's characters and environments.

The extras can be found in your Steam installation location for Wasteland 2. (e.g. C:\Program Files\Steam\SteamApps\common\Wasteland 2)

About This Game

Welcome back to the Citadel, Rangers! After 2.5 years in development and with the help of over 70,000 Kickstarter backers, the Wasteland's hellish landscape is now waiting for you to make your mark… or die trying.

Awarded Game of the Year by PCWorld, Wasteland 2 is the direct sequel to 1988’s Wasteland, the first-ever post-apocalyptic computer RPG and the inspiration behind the Fallout series. Until Wasteland, no other CRPG had ever allowed players to control and command individual party members for tactical purposes or given them the chance to make moral choices that would directly affect the world around them. Wasteland was a pioneer in multi-path problem solving, dripping in choice and consequence and eschewing the typical one-key-per-lock puzzle solving methods of its peers, in favor of putting the power into players’ hands to advance based on their own particular play style.

The Wasteland series impressive and innovative lineage has been preserved at its very core, but modernized for the fans of today with Wasteland 2. Immerse yourself in turn-based tactical combat that will test the very limits of your strategy skills as you fight to survive a desolate world where brute strength alone isn’t enough to save you. Deck out your Ranger squad with the most devastating weaponry this side of the fallout zone and get ready for maximum destruction with the RPG-style character advancement and customization that made the first Wasteland so brutal. Save an ally from certain death or let them perish – the choice is yours, but so are the consequences.

Key Features


  • One Size Does Not Fit All: Don't feel like finding the key for a door? Why not try a Rocket Launcher! Basically the same thing... right?
  • Enhanced Classic RPG Game Play: Classic RPG game play ideas updated with modern design philosophies.
  • Decision Making... with Consequences: With both short and long term reactivity to the players choices, every decision matters in the outcome of the story.
  • Huge & Customizable: Dozens of hours of game. Hundreds of characters. Thousands of variations on your Rangers' appearance. Over 150 weapons. Dozens of skills. Even the UI can be customized.
  • Steam Features: Wasteland 2 supports Cloud Saving so you can sync your saves across multiple computers!
  • Enhanced Audio: Immerse yourself in the post-apocalyptic soundscape with Razer Surround.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP/Vista/7/8/8.1 (32 or 64 bit)
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo or AMD equivalent
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 or Radeon HD 4850 (512 MB VRAM)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX compatible sound card
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7/8/8.1 (64 bit)
    • Processor: Intel i5 series or AMD equivalent
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 or Radeon HD 5770 (1 GB VRAM)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX compatible sound card
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OSX 10.5 or higher
    • Processor: Intel Core i5 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 300 Series or Radeon equivalent (512 MB VRAM)
    • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Mac OSX 10.5 or higher
    • Processor: Intel Core i7 2.66 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 400 Series or Radeon equivalent (512 MB VRAM)
    • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 or later
    • Processor: 2.4ghz Intel Core 2 Duo or equivalent
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 or Radeon HD 4850 (512 MB VRAM)
    • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 or later
    • Processor: Intel i5 series or equivalent
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 or Radeon HD 5770 (1 GB VRAM)
    • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
36 of 46 people (78%) found this review helpful
57.9 hrs on record
Posted: December 20, 2014
While I really enjoy Wasteland 2, my recommendation would have to come with a huge dose of "your mileage may vary". It's a long, slow, burn, and if you like to jump straight into things, or find yourself easily losing concentration or focus, you may find yourself giving up on Wasteland 2 before it really begins to shine. But some patience will pay off, if the genre interests you. Of course, if you don't like turn-based strategy games, then you should be giving this a pass. The writing is really top-notch in this game, and I found it both enjoyable and rewarding to play through.

Focused on a team of 4 rangers (which you can create yourself, or use several pre-built characters), and using very detailed attributes and skills - the CLASSIC system (Coordination, Luck, Awareness, Strength, Speed, Intelligence, Charisma), it took me a while before I realised that some attributes and stats were extremely important, while others... could be passed over, especially depending on the followers (NPCs) you decided to acquire. Unfortunately, it can take some trial and error before you realise what you should be doing with your characters and what is important for them to have. Or... you could just forge ahead anyway! I quite liked that there were no classes, giving you the freedom to do whatever you wanted with your characters. You could have a guy carrying heavy weapons, while being a melee tank and also healing... for example. Though this can also be a negative, if you wanted to see class specialisation, perks, and so on.

And so, I was introduced to the fun (???) of character creation. And uhh... naming my characters, which proved to be a disaster... after an embarrassingly long time, I settled on "One", "Two", "Three", and "Four". Original, right. The vast array of skills can be intimidating at first, and leveling them up (especially at later levels) can become quite frustrating and very grindy, but it does add a lot of depth to the game. One thing I did not like as much though... how much time it took, and the animation, whenever you wanted to use a skill. Using a skill meant that your Ranger (or follower) would have to move to the location (clumping up your Rangers if you moved them all as a group makes this an exhausting chore), before an animation begins. With the vast amount of skill checks in this game, the checks do add up and can become very time consuming and therefore annoying.

Additionally, there is quite a lot of travel involved in this game, both in the larger world map, and also within smaller exploreable areas. Even if you're not in a rush, the travel can quickly become aggravating. I wished for quicker travel myself, despite the fact I don't mind slower paced games.

While you are limited to Arizona and California, one after the other, the world map is still pretty expansive, with secret areas to discover dotted around the place. Travelling isn't worry free though - not only are there standard enemy encounters (which can become annoying quite quickly), but also some more welcome encounters, which is a bit different and somewhat refreshing in comparison to the usual fare where encounters in the wild just end up being endless fights. There are also two unique mechanics: water and radiation. Your team carries canteens, which can, and should be refilled at any well and oasis you find. Once you run out of water, your team starts to dehydrate and can die. Similarly, in the post-apocalyptic wasteland, nukes have left lingering radiation in various areas - so you also have to watch out for contamination... or again, you'll find your team dropping like flies.

The musical score, sound effects, and even the voice acting is all done quite well, and combines well with the graphics to provide a smooth and enjoyable spectacle. The graphics are not the best in the world, but they do set the tone of the game well, and are very appropriate to the game's setting - harsh, gritty, and unforgiving.

Combat is generally quite straight forward, with the standard turn-based combat fare reappearing here, though more in-depth compared to some other games due to the more extensive attribute and skill system. Your attributes and skills will determine in what order your characters go, and how much they can do in their turn. There are also crouch and cover mechanics, though some weapons can destroy cover. However... there is not much else. There are no real special combat moves, or combat specific skills - they increase your damage and hit percentage, and that's it. No executes, no cloak, etc. While there is headshot and ambush... they are honestly not that great. It's just point, click, hope to hit (the RNG seems to be a bit odd, with a lot of misses even on shots with a high hit percentage), rinse and repeat. There is no cover, no flush, no interesting and genuinely unique abilities.

Additionally, RNG can always turn around and give you a hard time. Or... adversely affect the enemies. Critical hits, critical misses, weapon effects, and weapon jams can all have a surprisingly large affect on the outcome of an encounter. I also like the emphasis on scarcity and the need for careful management of your resources, which is quite fitting for a game like this, especially the ammo. If you just blaze away, you'll be out of ammo before you know it, so you do need to think before you act. Vendors are limited too... The combat is decent, and I enjoyed it, but I will admit there could have been more to it.

While your team revolves around 4 characters, you are able to recruit a number of NPCs to join your team (3 followers for a maximum team size of 7). While you are nominally in control of them, leadership is important here as there is the chance your "follower" (only if they are in a good mood) will just decide to do their own thing in combat - running into cover, shooting something you didn't want shot, etc. Overall, the combat is fun and challenging, with a variety of enemies to conquer - both man and animal.

Despite there only being two areas to explore, Wasteland 2 boasts a wide variety of quests, many of which have a variety of ways to finish - but be careful, your choices do have serious and lasting consequences. Which is something else I really enjoy about the game - your choices DO matter. And have a ripple effect. This is not just limited to quests, there are some actions while just generally playing and moving around which could have an affect, especially based on which followers are with you. Do you dig up some graves? Do you disarm the alarm? Do you deliberately trip it off? Do you use strength or a grenade to break a wall? Do you help this faction, or the other faction? Mediate a ceasefire or shoot everybody up? The variety of ways to overcome things in your way is definitely a highlight of the game. I really enjoyed the varying options available, and weighing them up, based on what you want your team to do. Your decisions may cause followers to leave your party, or even turn on you. Not only does this create an interesting in-game dynamic where what you do will affect how other in-game characters interact with your party, but this also allows for extensive replayability, if you so choose. "What if" questions are plentiful in this game.

Finally, I particularly loved the odd references and humour. The Wasteland 1 disc was a particular highlight. While not particularly game-making, or breaking, it was something that I enjoyed. The grand adventure that plays out, in addition to the continued support and patching by inXile, make me give this game two thumbs up.
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68 of 104 people (65%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
18.7 hrs on record
Posted: March 5
TL:DR buy Fallout 1&2 and play those instead; they are similar, superior games and cost a fraction of the price.

I backed this on kickstarter and was very enthusiastic about playing the finished product. I loved all the old Interplay games back in the day, and I thought that a modern remake of Wasteland that stayed faithful to old-school RPGs couldn't possibly go wrong.

It's a real shame that Wasteland 2 turned out to be such a slog. The 'tactical' combat is basic and repetitive, with no tactics beyond making sure you have your best weapons equipped, and focusing fire on each enemy until they are dead. This game is supposedly the spiritual successor to the early Fallouts but the combat is actually a step backwards from them. No aimed shot limb cripples, torso-shredding burst fire crits, stuns, knockdowns, or anything beyond hitting and subtracting hitpoints - headshots are available but they just take a bigger chunk of HP. There is a half-hearted cover mechanic but if you don't use it, it doesn't matter. Even when levelling up later in the game and getting better armour and weapons the combat is still the same grind.

Levels are certainly sprawling, but are mostly full of monotonous fights and heavily trapped/locked boxes (that usually turn out to be full of jokey 'flavour' junk items). Fight, help locals, move plot forward a bit, travel to next area. Not necessarily a bad formula but it is the same over and over, coupled with the incredibly dull combat. Text pops up for dialogue and to describe things happening but it appears in a tiny box at the corner of the screen which can't display much of it at once - which seems bizarre when there is so much reading to be done, and very little voice acting.

The setting is interesting and the plot is well written with some genuine laughs and memorable characters to encounter. But when they come wrapped up in such an unpolished, uninspiring package with such ancient production values, it's very difficult to appreciate them.
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22 of 28 people (79%) found this review helpful
22.0 hrs on record
Posted: April 16
Wasteland 2 is an isometric party-based role-playing game set in a post-apocalyptic southeastern United States.

The Great:

- Deep and expansive story that starts quickly and expands out in numerous branching paths
- Real player choices that change both the progression of the story and how gameplay mechanics play out (can avoid combat using conversation)
- Incredible amount of quality content as the story expands to tremendous length and allows for deep exploration

The Good:

- The combat system is of good quality and gives much variety and satisfactory tactical options

The Bad:

- RPG progression skills and traits are locked once selected which can cause significant potential problems for new/inexperienced players
- Some of the areas are notably barren or seemingly unfinished (e.g. all the random encounters that are nearly exact repeats of each other)

Conclusion:

Wasteland 2 should be on everyone's short list for engrossing stories in RPGs.

9.0 / 10.0
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62 of 101 people (61%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
137.7 hrs on record
Posted: December 25, 2014
I cannot recommend Wasteland 2. I played and heavily enjoyed the original, and have played all Fallouts. I enjoy most turn-based tactics titles like X-COM (original and new), Fire Emblem, Silent Storm, what have you, and Wasteland 2 is not worth your time. It's mechanically shallow, the skill system is a joke, and weapon types are ludicrously imbalanced. It's a completely bare-bones system, skills are absurdly redundant (somethign like 6 different skills to open boxes for six different kinds of boxes), the loot system is has zero appeal, and you'll quickly find that the only weapons worth using are your assault rifles, with maybe one sniper specialist. Ah, and explosives, which all have 100% perfect aim regardless of your demolitions skill and can trivialize most encounters.

Due to clunky armor systems, you'll find yourself taking off your armor to fight some of the game's toughest monsters because they actually do less damage to you without your armor.

Mines are annoying. You'll find your characters disarming hundreds of these through the game just to walk through, and they do enough damage that even one can cripple your party - which means that either you're going to walk really carefullly all the time, or most likely, you'll just reload when you run into a mine - something I'd normally feel guilty about doing, but let's face it, the only reason this happens is because there's no formation system to speak of.

A further consequence is that there's really no good way to position your characters before a battle. Sensibly, you'd like to put all your guys behind cover, maybe leave your sniper further away. Except in Wasteland, you're almost bound to trip their detection, giving them the first shot. After awhile, you don't bother with setting up with the clunky system, you just switch all your guys to long range weapons and have them alpha strike, or maybe have your snipers shoot simultaneously at a target, because anything else is likely to give them first shot, and get you killed.

The story is nothing to write home about, and the writing is okay, but it gets wearing after awhile the sheer amount of pop culture thrown in. Honey badgers were cute the first time you ran into them, but after awhile they're an annoyance, especially since they are essentially zero threat unless you screw up and let them get in melee range, after which they're deadlier than anything short of a robot-death-machine, but also have ridiculous number of hit points, meaning that early on you're going to be kiting them.

Speaking of which, at higher difficulty levels, hit points become ludicrous, which I've always felt is the sign of a lazy difficulty system.

Anyway, not recommend. Mediocrity.
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30 of 46 people (65%) found this review helpful
73.7 hrs on record
Posted: December 23, 2014
Man is this game good. Wasteland 2 should be the benchmark for franchise reboots and how to do them right. So often, when a beloved franchise of yesteryear gets a new game, one of two things is the result:

1) The game is pretty cool, and has the same theme as the original, but is wholly different in most other ways, and has completely replaced all your classic gameplay with something else. (See: Fallout)

2) The game is faithful to the original to a fault, the big fault being that the original was sort of clunky and it's now many years later so they should have made this ♥♥♥♥ a lot less cumbersome, but chose direct adaptation over quality.

Wasteland 2 manages to thread the needle and avoid both of these traps. All that good classic Fallout-type gameplay is there, but they've gotten rid of all the agonizingly slow annoying clunkiness. This is just pure old-school fun. The skill-use system is great. Assigning skill points is great. Making decisions that matter and effect the world is great. This game is an exemplar of the form, and while not everyone enjoys tactical combat and meaningful choices in a harsh world, anyone who does should play this game.
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22 of 33 people (67%) found this review helpful
48.7 hrs on record
Posted: January 2
This is NOT AT ALL like Fallout 1 and 2 or similar classic CRPGs which offer significant choices and freedom, interesting dialogue, chances to use your creativity.

It's mechanical in the most boring way. You march linearly through a sequence of mostly empty areas. In each area, you do the same tedious and repetitive click-and-wait, which is all minor variations on the following minigame: find box, disarm trap [wait], disarm alarm [wait], unlock lock [wait], unlock tumbler [wait]. The waiting really is excessive. If you accidentally click things in the wrong order, which is guaranteed to happen since the click-wait dance is so boring, the box blows up or the alarm goes off. When you succeed, you get some minor loot. Which you must hold on to forever, because there is only one container in the entire game that you can put things in, and the game tells you things are junk when they might be useful.

Skills are all for boring skill checks like this; too few points, and you'll keep failing and waiting over and over, or have to take the long route through the area. That's too bad, since skills are your only way of interacting with the world outside combat.

Occasionally an area contains a friendly NPC. I guarantee that NPC has nothing interesting to say, and don't expect deep dialogue trees with important and rewarding decisions. Even the writing is boring. Just click all the topics until they go away to update quest status. Then go to some other area, do same tedious boxes-and-combat dance, come back to turn in quest for reward. Your reward is to level up and increase the mandatory weapon and box-opening skills. These are also illusory choices, because if you put points into the wrong skills, you will just be waiting more. It turns out there's one optimal way to make a character, this is impossible to determine before you have played the game or copied the perfect recipe, and if you didn't do it, the game is even more tedious. Unlike Fallout, you can't make weird characters like a a low-intelligence talker character or a nonviolent sleazeball work out. Just restart and build the character in the combat-oriented way you are forced to do.

What this leaves is a ton of unavoidable turn-based combat - which is decent, though simplistic; it mainly tests whether you put enough points into the right gun skills, because several of the gun skills are really not worthwhile.

Please do not buy this game unless turn-based combat is your primary interest. It's a "tactics" game. If you expect anything else, you'll be disappointed. If what you want is an RPG with choices, run away. There are no real choices. Your choices (such as they are) are morally 1-dimensional, you can't affect the politics or world in any interesting way, and it's not really possible to be bad or even strange. The only thing it is possible to be is a character which marches through the predetermined missions shooting things as intended.
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29 of 47 people (62%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
17.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 28, 2014
Wasteland 2 hearkens back to the day when a 7% chance to fail meant failing 3 out of 4 times, and a game would beat your ♥♥♥ into the ground for the first hour or two, and then dramatically ease up after you get to sink a few skill points into your characters.

I'm not sure whether it's more appropriate to say that this game is Wasteland 2 or Fallout 3D, given it owes so much to the original Fallout, which in turn owes a lot to the original Wasteland. In any case, if you've played any of the original isometric Fallout games, then you will be right at home playing Wasteland 2 as the locations, world map, sound track, random encounters, combat, sense of humour, and missions all hold strong comparisons. Also, interestingly, there are positive aspects of the combat that are borrowed from XCOM: Enemy Unknown as well.

But that's not to say that this is just knock off - Wasteland 2 is deeply linked to the original Wasteland in its lore and the developers have learnt from the long gap between releases and taken the best of the old and the new and combined them to create a well-designed and deeply entertaining product.

Speaking of well-designed, as much as I generally dislike what Early Access has done to Steam, this is one of the games that has clearly benefitted from the system as you can spot numerous little features that have been implimented to improve the game's basic playability and fun-factor. Things like a button to sell all your junk at once, comparisons between the weapon you want to buy and the weapon you have, a solid log book that displays your missions, a button that reveals all objects that you can interact with, and the choice to automatically distribute your loot intelligently to the people who would use it best. All these things and more save the player time, eliminate clunky inventory management or frustrating moments when you don't know where to go or what to click - issues that were all too common in the heyday of isometric games.

Wasteland 2 is a loving heir to the original, and exists as a well-designed gem in a genre that typically suffers from over-complexity, suffering little of the clunkiness that one might expect from what one could call a 'throwback'. Its world is real and believable, the combat is fun (even if, at times, the hit chance feels skewed) and its characters are numerous, colourful and well-acted.

I highly recommend this to anyone who loved the original Wasteland, any of the Fallout games, or indeed anyone who likes a well-optimised RPG.
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15 of 22 people (68%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
118.7 hrs on record
Posted: February 26
*Contains minor spoilers*
Well... I went all the way from loving this game into hating it and then to accepting it and finally to like it. So, it turned out that:

1. This is NOT a Fallout1/2. It's more like Fallout Tactics with FO 1/2-ish endings.
2. You can solve most of your problems 2 ways: using speech or lockpicking skills. Or both.
3. Devs thought "We will make 3 kinds of speech and 3 kinds of lockpicking skills. It will create so many choices". Well, actually no, it's still 2 ways.
4. Assault rifles are most useful weapons in the world. All other weapons are not worth your skillpoints.
5. Melee specialists will do nothing first half of the game except getting hurt all the time. During second half they should learn how to use assault rifles.
6. Throwing weapons do not require a skill. Even monkey could throw a grenade, right?
7. You can never tell from the view of your team which armor they are wearing. Cause stockings with garment are more important in the wasteland then power armor, right?
8. Energy weapons do very little damage to unarmored enemies. Please read this line again to understand the level of absurd.
9. Main story quest deviated very little from "the search for GECK". Actually you'll look for 2 types of chemicals.
10. You can dig all the graves in the world. No one cares.

I could go on with this list, but I think you get the picture by now. Not to mention clumsy 3d-models with ugly skin and absolutely unnecessary sims-like character editor (can give you nightmares). It's mostly poor choice of engine. But if you like a good tactics with turn-based combat in a postapocalyptic setting - you'll buy this game. It will punish you in order to make you start another playthrough. And you'll learn to accept it "as is". Like I did.
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17 of 27 people (63%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
45.0 hrs on record
Posted: April 6
I backed it on Kickstarter, I'm a huge fan of the Baldur's gate series, Fallout 2 to New Vegas, Diablo, and many other RPGs, and think Wasteland 2 was absolutely terrible.

With 40+ hours of game-time I feel like I have a pretty substantial view on Wasteland 2, and in the end, I think the devs just don't understand what actually makes a game ***fun***:

* Walking across an entire area cleared of all enemies to get back to the world map is not fun.
* Holding back on my attributes because I might run into some challenge requiring more lockpicking is not fun.
* Being interrupted on the world map for nearly always boring-as-♥♥♥♥ random encounters is not fun. (Seriously though, couldn't you make some unique random encounters that are more than nameless badies, or stop spamming me with encounters when I have a 100% chance of running?)
* Save scumming is not fun. Holy ♥♥♥♥, 50% of my time is spent save scumming. Want to open a safe? Save scum. Want to take apart a weapon and need a certain piece? Save scum. Starting a hard battle and need to hit an enemy with a hard-to-hit headshot? Save scum.

"Oh but just don't save scum and accept the consequences" is the worst excuse I can think of. It is simply human nature to shoot for the best outcome; failing at a percentage based challenge we know we can avoid by save scumming just feels bad. It feels almost equally as ♥♥♥♥♥♥ to waste time trying to get the desired outcome, but still feels better than getting ♥♥♥♥-all for your effort by accepting your ♥♥♥♥ luck.

New Vegas did this right: If you had the attributes to attempt a challenge it was pass fail. There was no reason to save scum,; save scumming wasn't even an option! Diablo did this right: If you exit the game, you save the game; you aren't even able to save scum! How did the devs mess up this crucial component in 2014?

**Graphics and Camera**

The graphics themselves are only OK. I don't expect them to be ground-breaking on an indie game. With that said, Fallout 1/2 and Baldur's gate still stand the test of time because every background is a literal work of art. Wasteland 2 simply looks, well, OK.

The real issue is that the 3D camera mechanism SUCKS. The compass is constantly off in some unexpected orientation, things are often hidden from view, and the map system is painful at best. The landscape is so bland and monotonous that you can't tell where you are from simply looking around. Even after 40+ hours of game time I still get lost unless constantly looking at the map and re-orienting the compass. Even Baldur's gate, a game made in the late 90's, had user-placable map-markers, and BG 2 had pre-placed markers on top of that so you could tell where the ♥♥♥♥ you were.

On top of the confusing camera and map, there is almost NO quick travel. Why do I have to walk across the entire prison map or Ranger Citadel to get in and out!? How does that enhance my experience? How is that enjoyable? It certainly doesn't make the game any harder, it just wastes more of our time.

**Combat**

Combat is OK; there is some element of strategy, and action point management is mildly interesting. That said . . it could really use more variety. Games like Diablo and the BG series had so much variety with spells and skills. Fallout 3 and New Vegas had the VATS system, stealth, and live combat. Wasteland 2 is just a throwback to Fallout 1/2, which is fine on it's own, but 15+ years later they couldn't think of anything new?

On top of this, the lack of pause and coordination before a fight is maddening. In baldur's gate you could issue tasks to each member of your party to do unique and interesting actions . . you know . . LIKE A REAL AMBUSH!? In wasteland 2, all you can do is shoot the ♥♥♥♥ out of one person. Hell, even fallout 1 and 2 let you go into VATS mode!

When I win a fight in Wasteland 2, I don't feel very GOOD about it. There simply isn't enough strategy to actually make much of a difference in a fight. The real decider of outcome seems to rely on your weapons, and the enemies decisions. If anything, I feel like I should go grind for experience to have a better chance, and that just makes me sad about wasting more time to progress in the game.

**The Attribute System**

Fargo talked all about making characters with specialties but absolutely failed. Getting by with a character who has under 8 intelligence is a pain in the ♥♥♥ because you miss so many skill-based opportunities. None of the other attributes influence your skills, so they are all a depressing mix of combat-stats. Charisma only needs to be high enough to pick up companions, and you're left ♥♥♥♥♥♥ off if you put it too low to include one. It all just feels like a ♥♥♥♥♥♥ min-maxing formula: "At least 8 int, at least X charisma for these party members, and whatever mix gets the best AP for the rest of the stats while retaining a reasonable combat initiative. All this tailored to the weapon (higher CI for close-range weapons)".

Because the stats do not influence skills, they all do practically the same thing. Nobody is actually specialized because making a character with too low of AP or combat initiative makes them near useless. Anyone used to a little bit of customization in RPGs will just make everyone a bland average that optimizes as much AP as possible.

**The writing/acting**

Good god, I don't know if it is the writing or the actors, but this ♥♥♥♥ is cringe-worthy the whole way through. From the insanely clean live-actors (really? No dirt on a DESERT ranger?) to the how-in-the-♥♥♥♥-am-I-supposed-to-suspend-my-disbelief voice acting, it is just painful. Did anyone actually enjoy the live-action video? Couldn't that money have been spent better elsewhere? Does Vargas talk like any real person you've ever heard?

And finally . .

**Side Quests**

Rails nomad is the only place in all of Arizona that is full of quests you don't need to do to finish the game. All other standalone areas either have only a handful of trivial sidequests. The main areas themselves have many trivial side quests . . but none have any *substance*. The nuke silo is about the only substantial sidequest I can think of, and even that is pretty damn trivial in length. Compare to things like Fallouts 1 - New Vegas or BG, where there are side-quests spanning multiple areas, and MANY areas at least as intricate as Rails Nomad. All the side quests in Wasteland 2 just feel like shallow time-sinks.
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9 of 13 people (69%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
149.8 hrs on record
Posted: May 10
“Bottle caps?! We only accept scrap.”

Greetings to you, traveller! We welcome you into our wasteland with water in our cans and radiation in our lungs!

You may not understand our wasteland, you may even fear it. Do not worry, we have all struggled in such ignorance or died of thirst in the desert. To understand what the wasteland is, is to understand the Great Glow. Everything is part of it, but it is the mushroom cloud that expresses it most directly.

But, do you not need to seek the next mushroom cloud to find the Great Glow? The answer is no! Look into the eyes of a mutated animal that is about to attack you. See that energy, that life there? That is the Great Glow.

Of course the blessing of the Great Glow is not for free, for nothing in life is free. Study the various wasteland guides to truly understand the Great Glow, the nature of the mushroom cloud, and understand why salvation lies only through their wisdom.

And always keep these rules in mind:

1. Tread lightly and carry a big gun and/or stick.
2. Every animal with the prefix ‘mutated’ considers you to be its lunch.
3. If your Geiger counter starts going off the scale, you should turn around.
4. The only thing worse than a robot the size of a truck with a circular saw and a laser beam, is a robot the size of a house with a minigun, a flamethrower and half a dozen minions that are coming right for you.
5. Toaster repair is essential for a good breakfast.

Fun fact: The credit song “Cries of a Dead World” by Miracle of Sound perfectly captures the atmosphere of Wasteland 2.
--

My rating system consists of six categories in descending order of importance:

- Atmosphere
- Combat & Controls
- Tactical gameplay
- Characters
- Details
- Story

Based on the performance each category will receive one of the following grading:

- S-Rank: excellent
- A-Rank: very good
- B-Rank: solid
- C-Rank: satisfactory
- D-Rank: inferior

If the S-Rank is awarded, a quote from the game or personal comment will be added as a token of my respect (in brackets).
--

Atmosphere: S-Rank

(A little more persistence, a little more effort, and what seemed hopeless failure may turn out to glorious success.)

Combat & Controls: S-Rank

(If yer sober, that’s the best yer gonna feel all day.)

Tactical gameplay: S-Rank

(The supreme art of combat is to subdue the enemy without fighting.)

Characters: S-Rank

(This oddly dressed merchant sports a slight tan, huge arms and legs, a bear belly, and big beard with two white stripes in it. Under normal circumstances the pink tutu around his belly would look odd, but somehow Ratboy makes it work.)

Details: S-Rank

(Shoving your hand into a roiling vat of glowing radioactive gloop is probably one of the worst ideas you’ve ever had.)

Story: S-Rank

(War does not determine who is right – only who is left.)
--

To conquer all achievements of Wasteland 2, you will most likely spend more than 100 hours. You can get them all in one play-through, assuming you watch out for the ‘Wasteland Historian’ achievement.

There are no multiplayer achievements.

Two very useful guides can be found on the links below (thanks to Carrarius & Tigi).

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=343414185

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=343281481

Achievement difficulty: 8 of 10

Common:
- Singleplayer [+2]

Special:
- Blast from the Past [+1]
- Not Monkeying Around [+1]
- Relics of a Bygone Age [+1]
- They Walk Among Us [+1]
- Too Much Time on Yer Hands [+1]
- Wasteland Historian [+1]
--

Wasteland 2 (PC) – Turn-based role-playing game
(Post-apocalyptic Science Fiction) – 2014
-
Wasteland (PC) – Classic turn-based role-playing game
(Post-apocalyptic Science Fiction) – 1988
Link to Steam review for Wasteland.
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14 of 23 people (61%) found this review helpful
23.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 30, 2014
This was the year of the RPG and this was one I was really looking forward to. A strong pitch which felt like it laid out realistic goals, along with a spokesman who was hitting all the right notes. Yet what they delivered was so very bland. A combat heavy game with an incredibly shallow TBS component, one where it felt you did little more than maximise your damage each turn and terrain had little to no impact. Compared to Shadowrun Returns/Dragonfall, which had built their entire editor around creating good combat layouts, this was weaksauce.

More than that though, the characters and story were dull. You have a team of nobodies, which would be fine if you had a strong combat system to back it up. The personalities you do collect are at a Baldur's Gate 1 level, and less memorable than those. Not one of the NPCs, party or otherwise, stands out.

It just all came together to form a rather dull experience, and after a while I found I just sort of stopped playing. I couldn't find anything to motivate me to push on. That the primary mystery is spoiled during a joke death scene was just the icing on the cake.

It leaves me worried for Torment.
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18 of 31 people (58%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
136.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 11
Pressed a shiny red button in a museum.
Activated a nuke and killed everyone.

10/10 would press again.
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9 of 14 people (64%) found this review helpful
39.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 9
This is my first review ever here on steam, and never has a game compelled me so much to review it as WL2, so here goes.

Short Review: This is an unfinished game. If we, as players, accept this very low bar of completion as OK, then we will reap the "rewards".

In-Depth Review: I think it's important to understand where this game is coming from before criticizing it. Tons of Fallout fans were less-than-impressed when Fallout 3 came out and, despite being promised something other than a re-skinned Oblivion (now Skyrim) got just that.

As such, the hype was huge for a game from the original makers crowdfunded a true sequel with tried-and-tested Firaxis on board. The target of 1 million was met and grew to 3 million dollars. The game won a GOTY award and has been well-received.

That was all I needed, so jumped in and was ready for just such an experience.

I did some reading and carefully crafted characters for the long journey ahead, nevermind thst there's very little in a tutorial to prep you. I'm seasoned gamer, so go!

So I end up roaming the wastes and get random encounters. Some I try, some I try to flee. You get "caught", and then you're loaded into an instance. The mobs are now romaing about in the instance, not chasing you, and you get to do these a lot unless you have one skill. Same scenarios and maps. Hmmm...is this GOTY material?

Then you get into your first quest to go to X place and do Y things. Along the way, my noob party visited a much higher level area than they were fit for. Hmmm...no warning?

Luckily, we left and didn'tengage our certain death. We went on to the Ag Center. I was woefully unprepared, but managed to survive most of it...until I found myself at an impass: I had tried to crack a safe that has a critical keycard to enter one of the next areas, but I critically failed which essentially bricked the safe, which was the only place where I could get the keycard.

I went on having learned the critical rule of this game: you save about every 2 seconds and keep vast repositories of save lists. Unfortunately, I learned this after i borked the safe with the keycard. Not one to give up, I went on to other areas and did a boss fight where only 2 of my people had ammo left. After about 20 tries, we got the guy without running out of meds for people he wasted.

Now, that's what happened in the game. The combo of ridiculous bosses, minimal resources, and the CRUSHING fact that I might not get the keycard I needed nearly caused me to uninstall.

My reaction to this is now what you might expect, but it's what gets repeated ad nauseum on forums related to this game. I took this as old school. You just have to deal with your decisions. YEAH, and this makes everything more realistic, right? So I left and had my NPC surgeon Rose desert us and picked up Angela Deth, who is great and all but nobody told me i'd need her, and we progressed...

But at the same time, the clunky camera and its limited zoom functions created this "very atmospheric" sense that I was lost. I was...and just wanting one more level of zoomout as compared to the satellite view in my inventory.

And then you go into a scenario and place your characters just like you want them as you've done a thousand times by this point: in the right position but facing walls.

And this was the point of no return. I just realized that, for all the "difficulty" you face, the execution is just sucky. I knew that, if enough people complained, patches would fix things,but, I thought to myself for the first time ever, "THIS is GOTY?"

I stopped blaming myself and started thinking "these are the problems that justify the existence of play-testers." Did anyone playtest this game before release? Not based on my experience, and forums suggest I'm not the only one who's had the same problems I've encountered.

AND AND, if you want to see this done right, X-COM does it to near perfection.

Bottom line: the game required a million dollar budget. It got 3 million. In turn, we got something that is still in beta. finished.

I don't blame players who are enjying this, but I'll never trust entities again which have chosen it as GOTY when it's not
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15 of 26 people (58%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
40.3 hrs on record
Posted: April 2
Linear quests
Cookie cutter story
Ugly graphics
Somewhat prone to crashes
Boring combat
Random encounters suck
Character development/levelling is kinda boring due to the underlying skills and attributes being fundamentally kinda boring
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
553.0 hrs on record
Posted: December 30, 2014
For those of us still haunted by that fateful choice in Highpool on your Commodore 64, here is your chance to make amends and end that 30 year reoccuring nightmare...

Not gonna take away from Fallout. Great series in it's own right. I missed suma ♥♥♥ laude by .02 thanks to Fallout 3 being released 2 weeks before finals exams of the last semester of my senior year at university. Yeah, that's how much I love this series. However, the original Wasteland had a style of humor and storytelling that was unique for its time. In the early days of computer gaming, it was the first RPG to get the player emotionally involved. Every game afterwards tried to replicate this. Though they were great, they couldn't replicate it to the degree of the original.

This game is the true successor to the original. It doesn't fail to deliver great storytelling and that twisted sense of humor. Not going to lie, the game has its share of issues with gameplay. (e.g. quests outcome bugs) but the devs are addressing them in a timely manner. For those who don't require mindblowing graphics to experience a good story, this is a gem of a game. It won't dissappoint.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
21.1 hrs on record
Posted: January 3
Loved every second so far
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
140.4 hrs on record
Posted: December 27, 2014
Wasteland 2 is very much defined by your expectations of it - on its own, or as a sequel to the original Wasteland, it stands proud and incredibly successful, with a rich storyline (mostly) and fun gameplay, leaning more towards combat than dialog and choices, but still having plenty of the latter two just the same.

But if you expect Fallout 1/2 depth, or its balance of combat and choices, you shall be somewhat disappointed.

My advice? Take the game for what it is, and enjoy the ride. 'cause it's a great game, with a fantastic game world designed and written into it.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
66.3 hrs on record
Posted: March 28
Wasteland 2 is a good game, but overall fell short of my expectations. The funny thing is that the mediocrity of Wasteland 2 reminded me how great Fallout New Vegas was and I finally finished my walkthrough of that game, rather than continuing with Wasteland 2. Both games attempt the same thing in so many ways, but Fallout just does it better. The writing, the quests, the immersiveness... Even though I actually prefer isometric RPGs to Fallout's ego perspective, Wasteland's implementation of it has a wide variety of shortcomings. The world feels much more static because environmental objects cannot be manipulated, the different areas are much smaller in size, and the overall level of interaction is much lower.

Other downsides to be aware of:
- AI is very dumb
- Percentage based skill checks lead to a lot of reloading (it probably would have been better to have a binary 100% or 0% chance).
- Balancing of different weapon types is off (melee based characters seem weak, assault rifle beats everything)
- Battles are not tactical enough (more types of cover would have been nice, more firing modes, more environmental interaction, better system for explosive weapons)

In spite of all this critique, I enjoyed the "classic" feel to the game and the very post-apocalyptical setting that inspired the original Fallout. Thoroughly enyoable, but definitely not a must-have.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
25.4 hrs on record
Posted: March 31
I'm about a dozen hours into the game and as a fan of the early Fallout games, 'Wasteland 2' totally nails the small-scale tactical feel of Fallout combat (I never played the original Wasteland). Like the Fallout games, there are multiple ways to approach every situation, and your dumb meathead party member can be as useful as your pointdexter electronics nerd, if used right.

All the environments are very detailed and each city is unique in terms of design, though the brown / green colour palette gets a bit boring after a while. Totally suits with the theme, so can't really complain too much about that.

On top of that, the writing is pretty solid, with a lot of references to previous games and easter eggs as you'd expect. No Richard Dean Anderson though. Boo!

Basically, if you loved the Fallout games, you'll really like Wasteland 2. If you hated them, I don't think this game will change your mind. But then, I'm pretty sure this game wasn't made for you anyway, so that's fine :)
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
17.5 hrs on record
Posted: March 27
Fantastic game. 2D Fallout literally. Large party of characters. All customisable at the beginning. Deep and interesting dialogue. An immersive world. Its like going back in time to when games actually had a story...

Few negatives:
Map travelling is a bit of a letdown. Mainly because the rest of the world looks so nice and going to a flat featureless map with a moving dot gives me no sense of immersion. Bullet shortage/conservation affecting choices in combat is a bit more of a pain than it needs to be imo. At least early in the campaign.

Now if I could just find dogmeat to round out my party.....
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