This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs. From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.
User reviews: Mixed (2,583 reviews)
Release Date: Sep 10, 2013

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Buy Amnesia Collection

Includes 2 items: Amnesia: The Dark Descent, Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs

 

Recommended By Curators

"A Machine For Pigs is a very different game than The Dark Descent. But it is not lacking in quality."

About This Game

This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs.

From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.

The year is 1899

Wealthy industrialist Oswald Mandus awakes in his bed, wracked with fever and haunted by dreams of a dark and hellish engine. Tortured by visions of a disastrous expedition to Mexico, broken on the failing dreams of an industrial utopia, wracked with guilt and tropical disease, he wakes into a nightmare. The house is silent, the ground beneath him shaking at the will of some infernal machine: all he knows is that his children are in grave peril, and it is up to him to save them.

Unique Selling Points

  • Fresh and new approach to the Amnesia world while staying true to its origins.
  • The darkest, most horrific tale ever told in a videogame.
  • Stunning soundtrack by award-winning composer Jessica Curry.

System Requirements

PC
Mac
Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.6.8
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X 10.7.5
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2010.
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2012
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
44 of 66 people (67%) found this review helpful
3.7 hrs on record
"I do not know how a man can **** that much blood and still live."

For such a short game, it managed to feel drawn out and unnecessary. If there is one thing that we can learn from this narrative, it is that wordy and intelligent are not synonyms. It brushes against interesting themes, but does not reach any conclusion worth noting, aside from the classic video game trope that "evil is bad." The few encounters with enemy creatures devolve from an intial tense atmosphere to an annoyance, as the player realizes they can always outrun their opponent, and will never be challenged with completing a task while an enemy is present. Heaven forbid you stumble on one of the half-dozen safe points from which you can view the underwhelming models of the creatures you have been running from. In the final hour, there is a two-part boss battle which is mind-boggling in both concept and execution, and clashes harshly with the game's established world. Then you get on the pork shuttle to watch the game play the final act through on its own - though why the final scene concludes the game as the protagonist wishes is not obvious to me. This is not a technically challenging horror game, and it is not an intellectually challenging narrative adventure. This is a drawn out and densely crowded narrative-heavy gameplay-light experience, which manages to come across as half-baked.
Posted: June 22
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63 of 106 people (59%) found this review helpful
13.7 hrs on record
Whether or not you will like this game depends very much on what you are looking for.

This game is a polarizing one. You will likely laud it, or hate it. If you have to look up the word 'laud' in the dictionary, you should probably pass, (or better yet, buy the game and start the processes of understanding nuanced and subtle literature)

You will probaby enjoy this game if
- you appreciate enviormental atmosphere
- you enjoy literature
- you like horror that builds more on deep issues and less on 'shock' or 'camp' gimmicks
- you like Dear Esther
- you want to support developers that are pushing the boundaries on games as a literary medium
- you enjoy a game with puzzles that feel 'real-world' and don't call attention to themselves or hinder the pace of the
narrative

You will probably not enjoy this game if
- you don't like not having a gun in your video games
- you don't enjoy having to do your own critical thinking to come to conclusions concening the story or how it ends
- you think it will be very similary to The Dark Descent (the game feels much closer to Dear Esther in my opinion)
- you want something with puzzles that requires you to scratch your nogging
- you want a horror game where things jump out at you often

In short, if you value deep narrative experiences in games, and feel familiar with literature and coming to terms with your own underlying meaning, you will find an absolutely matchless gem here. Although narrative indie games are on the rise, this one is still leading the pack. If you don't value these things, or are looking for something that doesn't require you be knee deep in your mind, thoughts, beliefs and opinions, it may not suit you. Either way, consider this tale a gothic horror tale in the traditional sense, as anyone familiar with the novels Frankenstein or Dracula could tell you, the 'horror' is less about bloodshed or constantly spooking you, and more about building a sense of dread over the whole canvas.
Posted: July 4
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
8.1 hrs on record
First thing's first - I don't understand the angry rant about this game. People literally drown it in pig♥♥♥♥ while other really crappy titles manage to get away. Often the reason why players hate AMFP is that they beleive it's far worse than the original Amnesia. I suggest you should consider these two as completely different games. The Chinese Room (the developer I put highest hopes on and will defend) did their thing. OK, they got rid of core Amnesia gameplay elements (lantern oil, thunderboxes), but I think they did it for the good sake of the story. For story and atmosphere are the basis for Machine For Pigs. Storytelling is just plain dark, almost pitch-black and somewhat Lovecraft-ish as it's predecessor. Game is sophisticated as it is asks global and complex existential questions. Ominous atmosphere is here allright, driven by classy frightening sound desing and music. And YES, this Amnesia is scary - not too scary, but still.. Although it's hard to terrify a Survival Horror vet like me, AAMFP did that. And this what I ♥♥♥♥in' expect from a horror game! Ain't no need to throw ♥♥♥♥ at gamer's face, more of that - no need to drop them off their seats. Freeze them on the spot so they are afraid to move a finger! That's the real horror. And here's the thing some will consider DarkDescent-blasphemy: maybe removing oil tanks, thunderboxes and difficult puzzles was necessary for this particular project, like blinding a man makes his hearing sharper. Cutting the gameplay elements allowed story and setting take the spotlight. IMHO it's better than solving riddle after riddle after riddle in similar tunnels in Penumbra: Overture. Amnesia AMFP isn't an interactive movie though - you do things besides walking. I will however admit it lacks some hard puzzles. And dying. Yeah, I dropped dead TWO (!) TIMES. Anyway, it helped me to percieve the story better. Game's not short too - if you take time and won't charge your ♥♥♥ forward you'll get your healthy 8 hours as I did. To summerize, game's great, all I've expected from the sequel. Dark Descent fans should give it a fair chance, I think. Bare bones of the franchise, huh? Hell of a skeleton then. The Chinese Room FTW.
Posted: July 25
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.5 hrs on record
There is a lot of people that hate this game, and I know why:

TDD was a fad. The game became popular because of one thing, and one thing only: it was scary. Tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands likely bought this game because they wanted to get scared; they wanted a joyride complete with overwhelming fear. I don't blame them. The game is pretty scary, but here's the thing:

It seems that most people do not understand that Amnesia, and the games before it, were not just haunted-house amusement park rides like they like to act like it is. No, it's a lot more than that. The game has thick atmosphere, superb pacing and storytelling backed by a very dark story that keeps you curious from beginning and even to the end. To be able to truly appreciate TDD, you need to look further than the scare factor; it is not the only thing that made the game great. Guess what the Chinese Room capitalised on? The story. They wanted to tell a story, much like TDD did. MFP was much more of a psychological experience; the game did not need to scare you with darkness or spooky monsters, all it needed was an incredibly wicked story. This was fulfilled. I expected an atmospheric, thought-provoking horror experience that would keep me on the edge and this is exactly what the game did.

But what did everyone else expect? Probably something entirely different. They probably just wanted to get scared. Most of the fanbase is filled with people that appreciated TDD for nothing more than its scare factor, and therefor this is all they had expected from MFP. They are probably the kind of people that either skipped or skimmed through most of TDD's note readings, not givng a ♥♥♥♥ about the backstory whatsoever. They just wanted to get to the next "scare." The bad reception for this game purely comes from delusioned expectations, is what I believe. Horror is a much deeper genre than you'd think. Read up.
Posted: September 29
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6 of 7 people (86%) found this review helpful
12.8 hrs on record
Heh heh, scary, and good!
Posted: September 8
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344 of 443 people (78%) found this review helpful
5.7 hrs on record
To fans of Amnesia: The Dark Descent, this game is a huge disappointment. To start with the good, it excels at creating atmosphere. There are some great scenes and very fitting music. You get a small taste of a story that would probably have been interesting if they told you more of it, but then that’s all there is.

They give you an unlimited light source and simplify all other parts of the gameplay so you can just stroll through the one path they left you and let them tell you the story, which feels like a movie adaptation of a book where you can tell something's missing unless you've read the book, but there's no book.

I can’t understand why they used the Amnesia title for this game which plays NOTHING like The Dark Descent. It would have been a sort of okay game if they hadn’t tried to associate it with Amnesia, but since they did it's actually misleading on top of mediocre, so I recommend ignoring it and waiting for whatever comes out of Frictional next.
Posted: January 23
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