Little Nightmares

Tarsier Studio's darkly adorable Little Nightmares has just received its final piece of story DLC, known as The Residence.

The Residence marks the end to the adventures of flop-haired protagonist The Runaway Kid, whose journey began in Little Nightmares' original DLC episode, The Depths. The Runaway Kid's grim tale continued through the bowels of the horrifying ocean-bound vessel The Maw in The Hideaway, and concludes with a visit to the home of The Lady - who you might remember from Little Nightmares' main story.

"Armed only with his flashlight", says publisher Bandai Namco, "The Kid will have to repel the nightmarish illusions and dodge the traps set in the twisted library. As he goes to meet his fate, The Kid will shed light on the darkest secrets of The Maw..."

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Eurogamer

Rare has announced that it's having another beta-style Scale Test this weekend for its delightful multiplayer pirate extravaganza Sea of Thieves.

This latest Scale Test is happening right now on both Xbox One and PC, and will run until 10am, Sunday 25th February in the UK.

If you want to get involved, the same rules apply as in previous beta tests: you'll either need to have pre-ordered the game or to have signed up to the Sea of Thieves Insider programme. I belatedly signed up last weekend and still got access - so there's a good chance that you'll be able to join in the latest shenanigans if you're swift.

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Eurogamer

A big patch coming to Call of Duty: WW2 tomorrow speeds up competitive multiplayer gameplay and nerfs quickscoping.

Quickscoping is the act of using a sniper rifle to aim down sights before pullling the trigger at the first viable moment for what is hopefully a one hit kill. Those skilled in quickscoping can use it to devastating effect, turning a sniper rifle into a killing machine at medium and even close range engagements.

Quickscoping is the subject of much debate within the Call of Duty community, with some saying it should be scrubbed from the shooter entirely. After tomorrow's patch goes live, you'll find quickscoping with the Kar98k and the M1903, two of the more popular sniper rifles in Call of Duty: WW2, much harder as the ADS transition times for both guns have been nerfed.

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Eurogamer

Konami's Metal Gear Survive - the first in the Metal Gear series since creator Hideo Kojima's departure - is out in the UK today. It's an okay video game! But it also contains one of the more bizarre - and perhaps obnoxious - examples of microtransactions I've seen in a full price video game to date.

Metal Gear Survive contains a second currency powered by 'SV Coins' - coins that can only be purchased with real money - which enable access to XP boosters during your playthrough. All fairly mucky stuff, really, and nothing I'd condone - cosmetic items, at a push, are okay, though if you're willingly breaking your own game in exchange for cold hard cash I think you're admitting your progression system might be kind of broken already - but Metal Gear Survive does something fairly new to me.

In exchange for 1000 SV coins - around 7.99, seeing as that's how much a bundle of 1150 coins will cost you - you unlock access to an additional character slot. And that's the only way you can access an additional character slot.

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Assassin's Creed® Origins

I spent a couple of hours this week playing a preview build of the upcoming Assassin's Creed DLC, Curse of the Pharaohs - which, as the name suggests, is all about the ire of Egypt's rulers. Specifically, the dead ones. With some careless grave robbers helping themselves to powerful artefacts, the Pharaohs have grown restless and put a curse on the game's new region of Thebes.

The curse manifests in the intimidating Shadows of the Pharaohs - spectral representations of the disgruntled nobles that appear at random and murder everyone in the nearby vicinity. You - that is, Bayek - are charged with putting things right, and that's mostly achieved by hitting said things with a sword.

As you can see from the gameplay above, the region of Thebes is really rather nice - it's colourful, vibrant and also varied, as it also includes the world-famous Valley of the Kings. The true star of my time with the game, however (minor spoilers ahead, here) was the afterlife. The land beyond death is a real treat to explore, providing a beautiful and surreal imagining of what Bayek's afterlife might be like. You can see a whole bunch of new gameplay and find out more about the DLC from the video, but to be honest I mostly wrote this article to see what kind of Pharaoh puns you can come up with in the comments below. I'll start - you can't say Pharaoh than that. Sorry.

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Eurogamer

This was always going to be a tough sell. Metal Gear Survive is Konami's first big console game outside of PES since its infamous split with Hideo Kojima, and as if that wasn't enough to raise eyebrows, it has the temerity to carry on the lineage of Kojima's most famous creation, too. Survive? Given the spittle-flecked rage the mere mention of Konami is often accompanied by these days, you'd be surprised if any new Metal Gear game post-Kojima could.

All of which is enough to obscure the fact that this isn't the first Metal Gear without Kojima at the helm. Some of those spin-offs - think the brilliant Ghost Babel on Game Boy, the eccentric Acid on PSP or PlatinumGames' Rising, a game so good it threatens to eclipse some of the mainline Metal Gears - have even turned out okay. Survive, despite the acrimony and apathy surrounding it, can be racked up as another spin-off that's half-decent.

Like Acid and Rising, Survive veers away from the series' staple stealth action, instead offering its own spin on the likes of Rust and Ark that have proved so popular in recent years. Start with a blunt stick and an empty belly, then struggle to stay alive until you've gathered enough resources and recipes so that stick might become something more powerful, and you've crafted a cooker and a farm so that you might never go hungry again.

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All Walls Must Fall - A Tech-Noir Tactics Game

I have heard All Walls Must Fall described as a blend of real-time and turn-based tactical action, set in a retro-futuristic Berlin in which the Cold War never ended and where all matters of consequence unfold in the procedurally-generated nightclubs favoured by gay time-travelling superspies. Deep breath. Influences cover everything from Twelve Monkeys and X-Com to Invisible Inc, Superhot and - when it comes to the wonderfully grungy animation that chops together 2D character models and low-poly 3D backgrounds - the old Paddington Bear children's series that was so memorably narrated by Michael Hordern. It all sounds a bit complicated really. But it isn't. When you get into a fight here, All Walls Must Fall is gloriously, deliriously, skull-shakingly straightforward.

Gunfights are when All Walls Must Fall switches from behaving like a real-time nightclub exploration game (one of my favourite genres) and becomes a turn-based, grid-based tactical battler (which happens, rather neatly, to be my other favourite genre). You play as a hulking metal-armed killer who has been sent looping back through time within a single night so as to stop a bomb going off in the present. This means that time is as much his plaything in shootouts as space is. In fact, when you're exploring in the real-time mode, time is space. Each room you scout out rewards you with a few units of time resource that allow you to do all sorts of rewind-based shenanigans when the guns emerge. Time is space! Einstein would be proud. I bet he'd be well up for some futuristic clubbing, too.

Oh dear. I've made it sound very complicated again. It really isn't. Once the guns emerge a grid is imposed on the landscape and enemy targets are picked out with bright highlights. You can shoot them - weapons frequently have a couple of distinct attack modes - and you can dash around from one square to the next dodging incoming fire. The system's sufficiently kind so as to warn you when you're planning on moving into a square that means you'll be taking damage. The perks of a time-traveller, I guess.

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Eurogamer

Fortnite's massive Season 3 update is here, and developer Epic Games has offered a full rundown of everything it brings - including a look at the new Hoverboard and Hand Cannon, plus some of the Battle-Pass-exclusive cosmetics in video form.

Season 3's biggest Battle Royale additions - most of which have been teased previously - include building improvements designed to make construction smoother, faster, and more intuitive, plus an increase to 60 FPS on PS4, PS4 Pro, Xbox One, and Xbox One X.

Save the World mode, meanwhile, gets a Lunar New Year questline with new weapons and heroes (including Valentines Ninja Snuggle Specialist Sarah), as well as new music. The latter takes the form of an all-new, hour-long orchestral score, created by film composer Marco Beltrami (Logan, The Hurt Locker) and Pinar Toprak (the Krypton TV series) - and there are remixed versions to be heard in Battle Royale's lobby, launch, and log-in menus.

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Pit People®

Castle Crashers and BattleBlock Theater developer The Behemoth has announced that its outlandish turn-based strategy game Pit People will leave Early Access on March 2nd.

Pit People, which entered early access on Steam and Xbox One last January, is described as a fast-paced, turn-based co-op adventure, starring a cast of "tragically unique heroes". It features a single-player story mode, a two-player co-op story mode supporting both local and online play, and a 2v2 Arena mode for four players.

On a very basic level, Pit People plays out pretty the same as any hex-based strategy game. You take control of differing units (and, let it be said, some extremely weird units), and attempt to battle your way to victory through strategic placement of your characters, paying mind to their rock-paper-scissors-style strengths and weaknesses.

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Eurogamer

With Sea of Thieves' launch drifting ever closer, Rare has offered a closer look at Skeleton Forts - one of the new "emergent" activities that wannabe pirates will be able to encounter come release day and beyond.

We've heard about Skeleton Forts before, of course, albeit in general terms. Speaking in the latest edition of Rare's Inn-side Story video series, however, Senior Designer Andrew Preston and Senior Software Engineer Tom Berry not only shared further information, but showed the new cursed encounters in action.

As with Sea of Thieves' other so-called emergent events - storms and shipwrecks, for instance - cursed Skeleton Forts will come into play entirely on the game's whims.

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