An adventure in the Lands of Dream.
User reviews:
Overall:
Positive (33 reviews) - 100% of the 33 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Mar 24, 2016

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Recent updates View all (4)

June 23

Version 2.04 released

This update makes sure the save/load process is all in UTF-8, so it should no longer have problems with people who have non-ASCII Windows usernames. Apologies for this baffling problem; you'd think this sort of thing would have been universally sorted by now.

Clarification: everything's working fine for the majority of users, and was before too. I'm stuck on what appears to be a very rare bug that's affecting a single user - but if it's messed up for one person, there's probably more people out there who'd have the same problem, so I want to fix it. So you can expect one more patch to sort this out, although in general everything seems to be OK. (I do badly wish all of this was more standardized and less of an unpredictable horrorshow, but then, so do most developers.)

3 comments Read more

May 24

Version 2.03 released several days ago

Changes in v2.03:
- A few books in the library in Afthonia had somehow lost their titles. New titles have now been delivered, fresh from Oneiropolis University.
- A bit of missing punctuation has been discovered under a mushroom and put back where it belongs.
- All of this actually happened several days before this announcement, but it was a busy week that contained birthdays and other mysterious rituals, so someone forgot to post this message.

1 comments Read more

Reviews

“For those looking for an adventure with a sense of wonder, The Sea Will Claim Everything is a must-have.”
Adventure Gamers

“A surreal, intelligent adventure blends magical fantasy with a dash of realism.”
The Telegraph

“At first glance, the game’s cutesy, cartoony graphics and simplistic interface give the impression that this is a juvenile game designed for small children. However, it soon becomes apparent that the game is in fact a deeply political, philosophical, and even academic narrative that defies easy description. It is to adventure games what Umberto Eco’s Il nome della rosa is to murder mystery novels.”
Adventure Classic Gaming

About This Game

The Fortunate Isles are in trouble! The sinister Lord Urizen is using the economic crisis to impose his cruel policies on the people, and all the local politicians seem to be in his thrall. Meanwhile, the ancient biotechnological dwelling known as Underhome is facing foreclosure, and its inhabitants don't even know why. Desperate for help, The Mysterious-Druid, scion of the Mysterious-Druid family and caretaker of Underhome, creates a magical portal that will allow you to interact directly with the Lands of Dream.

Are you ready for a journey?

The Portal

The portal is easy to use - it functions much like a classic point & click adventure game. You can move around the world using specially-grown directional arrows, store objects in your surprisingly capacious inventory, talk to the inhabitants of the Fortunate Isles using a technodruidic Wall of Text biointerface, and spend most of your time examining mushrooms.

The Steam Version

Time in the Lands of Dream flows at a different pace, so it doesn't really matter that this portal was initially released in 2012. It has since been updated with a number of oft-requested features and improvements, as well as a number of strange additions and changes no-one asked for, but which have appeared anyway. Technodruidism is frequently unpredictable.

Feature List

  • Explore the Fortunate Isles!
  • Talk to interesting people and creatures!
  • A mouse in your inventory!
  • Walls of text!
  • Thousands upon thousands of details to find!
  • An awesome alchemy system that's totally not confusing!
  • Contains achievements!
  • Includes “The Road to Underhome” PDF!
  • No need to be into adventure games to enjoy this!
  • But it's cool if you are!
  • Literary, thoughtful, philosophical!
  • Quirky, interesting, different!!
  • Something, something, something!
  • Adjectives! Words! SEO-optimized flatulence!
  • You know what? Feature lists suck!
  • Better just read a few of the reviews!
  • Or try another portal to the Lands of Dream! Most of them are free!
  • If I see any more exclamation marks, I’ll get a headache!

Credits

The portal was created by The Mysterious-Druid with the help of Jonas Kyratzes (The Talos Principle, Serious Sam 4, The Infinite Ocean), Verena Kyratzes (Serious Sam 4, Zombies and Elephants, the Lands of Dream series), and Chris Christodoulou (Risk of Rain, Deadbolt).

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: XP (SP3), Vista, 7, 8, 10
    • Processor: You must have a processor.
    • Memory: 512 MB RAM
    • DirectX: Version 8.0
    • Storage: 242 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: RAM requirements may vary by OS.
    Recommended:
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Additional Notes: Not compatible with porcupines or nutrias. Works with mice, capybaras, most popular rodents.
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Overall:
Positive (33 reviews)
Recently Posted
Dread Guacamole
( 8.5 hrs on record )
Posted: June 26
The Sea Will Claim Everything is a bare bones graphic adventure, with simple puzzles and an over-reliance on pixel hunting. You're presented with single-image nodes and interact with "hotspots" by clicking on them - save for a few exceptions, there are no inventory or verb puzzles; you automatically use the correct object (if you have it) when needed.
But wait.
It's also hyperliterate, full of offbeat humor and loveable characters. It's imaginative to a fault, gentle, and filled with warmth. The story and the writing are excellent. So is the music.
I normally loathe pixel hunting in adventure games, but here it's turned into a strength - rooms often have dozens of objects to interact which, each one of their descriptions a joy to read.
The simplistic puzzling would be a problem, except that here it fits the game's pacing to a tee. And it still feels satisfying, mostly because it still depends on exploring the environments thoroughly.

Listen, this is one of the loveliest things I've played in a long time. If good, well-written stories interest you in any way, and you're not allergic to lo-fi graphic adventures, I recommend this game whole heartedly.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Puzzlem00n
( 0.9 hrs on record )
Posted: June 25
I began playing this game on January 1st, 2015 (before it was on Steam), and finished it the next day. Prior to playing, I was a conservative kid raised to believe every word Glenn Beck said. Today, I am a communist. And it's ALL THIS GAME'S FAULT!

You see, I belong to a narrow generation of youth who grew up on Flash games. Even today, the only consoles in the house are a Wii and a DS Lite, each with just a handful of games. It started with regular visits to Club Penguin and Miniclip, then Nitrome, and, as my desire for innovation grew, Casual Gameplay @ JayisGames. I subscribed to JayisGames on Google Reader (RIP) and once every few weeks, I scrolled through and clicked on everything interesting. This is how I discovered the work of Jonas and Verena Kyratzes. (Aside: this is also how I discovered Ludum Dare, where I would soon enter my own rudimentary games.)

I fell headfirst into the dreamy wonder of The Infinite Ocean, the lost world of Alphaland, and of course, the sweet laughter behind The Book of Living Magic. If I had to pin down what attracted me to those games, I would say "emotional payoff" -- these games, unlike most others, gave me an indescribable feeling somehow related to beauty. This feeling would cause me to babble on to my best friend for days about the games, especially The Infinite Ocean, its ambiguous plot quite the exercise for my 13-year-old brain. These games gave me my earliest notion that videogames could be art.

Now, I knew that Jonas's games were in support of communism, and that communism was antithetical to everything I then believed, but that only made them more intriguing. Bored of Fox's strawmen, I began frequenting Jonas's blog, cultivating his strong challenges to my beliefs. I even wrote a story in the comments once to counter him, but I'm afraid to dig that up, haha.

The Sea Will Claim Everything was the Kyratzes' first paid game, and being that I was a Kid With No Money, it was a several years before I bought and played it. And, well...

Games are about overcoming challenges. Your standard videogame challenges you to kill things before things kill you. But other games present a more meaningful challenge. Undertale, for example, challenges us to empathize with those hostile towards us. The Sea Will Claim Everything challenges your view of society.

You can fall in love with the Fortunate Isles like your own home, because these are the characters' homes. You can grieve the pillaging of the Isles and give your best to help, only for Lord Urizen's men to take everything away. Through the Lands of Dream, you can feel for the plight of humanity in our waking world.

But what really turned me to communism were the mushrooms. They look so dashing in red.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Ludwig #1
( 14.2 hrs on record )
Posted: June 1
If you're into point and clicks with a lot of reading and interesting themes, then The Sea Will Claim Everything is for you!
I bought this when it was just on Humble Bundle and loved it then, and after getting the newly updated version on Steam and playing through it again, I still love it. As with all of Jonas and Verena Kyratzes' games and stories, you will feel like you personally know the characters and care about each and every one of them. I'm a huge fan, and I look forward to The Council of Crows!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Tortoise_Crusader
( 69.7 hrs on record )
Posted: May 15
This is a wonderful and charming game with great music. It will provide hours of puzzling fun, and stick to your mind for a while. Elegant and profound. With the times.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
hermetico
( 6.3 hrs on record )
Posted: May 4
HIghly recommended.
Great point&click adventure game.
Absolutely original, different, one on its kind.
The interface design isn't the typical you can find in this kind of games.
It can take a while to get familiar with controls, menus, etc.
The game is humorous, philosophic, witty and crazy.
There are several surprises that I will not spoil, really crazy.
If you like adventure games, you will love it.
If you like original games, you will love it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Vekter
( 3.9 hrs on record )
Posted: May 3
This is one of the best point and click adventure games I have played. While short and puzzles aren't very challenging, the world and characters are very well realized and allow some light social comentary and introspection happen without being ham fisted. At no time did I feel lost or overwhelmed by what to do next. Adventure game enthusiasts or avid readers owe it to themselves to give this game a playthrough.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
ProtoNexus
( 10.0 hrs on record )
Posted: April 12
The Sea Will Claim Everything is a beautiful game on many levels. I have no qualms recommending it if you enjoy a wonderully crafted story, which I admit was emotional for me. The game world is also incredibly rich and feels "alive", even though it is depicted in a completely static manner.

There is a lot of reading in this adventure, which is one of the highlights to me, as it was so well done. The puzzles are not terribly complex, with only one giving me a little trouble. A lot of the joy of this game is discovering all of the little parts that make up the game world. As an example, every book in the game is unique and you'll discover just how complicated mushrooms can be. Also, the game doesn't really hold your hand and instead it requires you to explore and experiment, neither of which are downsides.

If there was a major downside to the game it would be that I wanted the story to continue, which is perhaps a very high compliment to a game. I also want to mention the beautiful music in the game. It really fit the experience and was a pleasant accompaniment to the experience.

I'm looking forward to many more adventures in the Land of Dreams!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
StranaMente
( 8.4 hrs on record )
Posted: April 10
Jonas Kyratzes, one of the writers of The Talos Principle, with the whimsical art of his wife Verena and the music by Chris Christodoulou (who did the music for Risk of Rain) united together to make a wonderful game.

The Sea Will Claim Everything is a very special and rare game that combines the exploration of a fantastic and creative world with interesting and deep analysis of modern economical and political problems.

Partially inspired by the economic crysis that struck Greek, and still holds many european countries, this magnificent game explore with a slow pace and a biting humour many unresolved problems of this situation, still aknowledging the difficulty of resolving it.

On top, or besides this, the game itself is the story of a wonderful group of magical island, whose beauty and existence is menaced. Kyratzes manages to write an interesting, moving, eccentric, dramatic and fun story, such as is life.

A truly interesting experience, with excellent music and wonderfully represented, that I suggest to experience slowly, and if needed be, with a tutorial if you encounter any empasse.
Do buy it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Seth of House Plum
( 9.9 hrs on record )
Posted: April 7
Finally an artsy indie game that's really enjoyable.

The Sea Will Claim everything is an extremely beautiful game. The hand-drawn graphics seem crude, but they engorge you in a matter of minutes. That's not to mention the peaceful, relaxing music.

This is a game that you can play for hours, just searching for easter eggs and funny rhymes. There is just so much packed into every scene, you could say it runs at 1 frame per half-hour.

You'll befriend all the friendly characters throughout the Fortunate Isles, and despite being composed of an unmoving image, each one is unique and captivating.

The gameplay and storyline are very meta, but the game handles the concept well. It might seem like the biotech window would ruin the immersion, but somehow the opposite is true.

To summarize, this game is basically a storybook brought to life and expanded to see a glimpse of the lives of many creatures in another realm. You'll start to feel at home at Underhome, and might not want to leave.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Tom
( 2.9 hrs on record )
Posted: April 3
TSWCE has very primitive gameplay, an ugly aspect ratio, crude graphics, and is still a great game

TSWCE is a point and click adventure game. But while not being my favourite genre, is still one of my favourite games of all time. TSWCE has a very slow pace, beautiful music and crudely drawn but very nice graphics. Full of small jokes, puns and references, many of which are quite obscure, there is something in there for everyone.

It's not like the story is incredibly compelling, or even that the gameplay is unmissible. The music is very nice, but still quite average. I don't know what it is about this game, but it is incredibly charming, and extremely fun to play (You won't even notice the time passing, you will intend to play 20 minutes and end up actually playing 4 hours xD).

TSWCE is another great example that a good game doesn't need amazing graphics, with processor hungry lighting shaders. Or even compelling gameplay. Because I still give this game 9.2/10.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
Recommended
14.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 1
If you're into point and clicks with a lot of reading and interesting themes, then The Sea Will Claim Everything is for you!
I bought this when it was just on Humble Bundle and loved it then, and after getting the newly updated version on Steam and playing through it again, I still love it. As with all of Jonas and Verena Kyratzes' games and stories, you will feel like you personally know the characters and care about each and every one of them. I'm a huge fan, and I look forward to The Council of Crows!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
0.9 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
I began playing this game on January 1st, 2015 (before it was on Steam), and finished it the next day. Prior to playing, I was a conservative kid raised to believe every word Glenn Beck said. Today, I am a communist. And it's ALL THIS GAME'S FAULT!

You see, I belong to a narrow generation of youth who grew up on Flash games. Even today, the only consoles in the house are a Wii and a DS Lite, each with just a handful of games. It started with regular visits to Club Penguin and Miniclip, then Nitrome, and, as my desire for innovation grew, Casual Gameplay @ JayisGames. I subscribed to JayisGames on Google Reader (RIP) and once every few weeks, I scrolled through and clicked on everything interesting. This is how I discovered the work of Jonas and Verena Kyratzes. (Aside: this is also how I discovered Ludum Dare, where I would soon enter my own rudimentary games.)

I fell headfirst into the dreamy wonder of The Infinite Ocean, the lost world of Alphaland, and of course, the sweet laughter behind The Book of Living Magic. If I had to pin down what attracted me to those games, I would say "emotional payoff" -- these games, unlike most others, gave me an indescribable feeling somehow related to beauty. This feeling would cause me to babble on to my best friend for days about the games, especially The Infinite Ocean, its ambiguous plot quite the exercise for my 13-year-old brain. These games gave me my earliest notion that videogames could be art.

Now, I knew that Jonas's games were in support of communism, and that communism was antithetical to everything I then believed, but that only made them more intriguing. Bored of Fox's strawmen, I began frequenting Jonas's blog, cultivating his strong challenges to my beliefs. I even wrote a story in the comments once to counter him, but I'm afraid to dig that up, haha.

The Sea Will Claim Everything was the Kyratzes' first paid game, and being that I was a Kid With No Money, it was a several years before I bought and played it. And, well...

Games are about overcoming challenges. Your standard videogame challenges you to kill things before things kill you. But other games present a more meaningful challenge. Undertale, for example, challenges us to empathize with those hostile towards us. The Sea Will Claim Everything challenges your view of society.

You can fall in love with the Fortunate Isles like your own home, because these are the characters' homes. You can grieve the pillaging of the Isles and give your best to help, only for Lord Urizen's men to take everything away. Through the Lands of Dream, you can feel for the plight of humanity in our waking world.

But what really turned me to communism were the mushrooms. They look so dashing in red.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
56 of 60 people (93%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: March 24
You know what I admire the most about The Sea Will Claim Everything? That it makes you adapt to its own pace: slow, almost languid. There is no rush, the game says. Come, sit down, have something to eat. Let’s just talk and watch the world in its endless beauty for a while.


It’s an easy one to pigeonhole: a first-person, fixed-perspective point-and-click adventure game with a heavy emphasis on dialogue and some mechanically light but clever puzzling. Populated by weirdos. Childlike art, lots of words, copious amounts of deliberately groanworthy puns. Moderately long. There we go: the Urizen within us is satisfied.

And yet it’s more than the description of its moving parts. Perhaps most of all, it’s a game about reading cheerful nonsense while listening to achingly beautiful and soothing music; it’s silly and playful and aware of itself and aware of you. It’s a love letter to Greece as it exists in the imagination. It’s a game about the wonders of the world, about the awe and joy of being alive, at this point in time, in this place, for now and forever. But it’s also a game of profound sadness, the sense that something is ending and the future is uncertain and scary, but even if we one day look back and see that some of the stops along the way were bad, we’ll know the journey has been worth everything we had.

Constantly weaving between hilarity and melancholy and everything in between, wearing both its childish wonder and its world-weariness proudly on its sleeves, but in the end always joyful, even in the face of tragedy, that’s what TSWCE is like. Unhurried, contemplative, happy. A drinking white wine in the sun kind of game: a rare and beautiful animal.

But also very, very silly.


The game is part of the Lands of Dream cycle, but knowledge of the other stories is not at all required for understanding the plot. You know what, though? If you’re even moderately interested, give The Fabulous Screech a try. It’s a free, very short and beautiful game, and the Lands of Dream in a nutshell. And when you come back, The Sea will still be here. And in the end, it will claim everything.
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23 of 27 people (85%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.7 hrs on record
Posted: March 24
I played this game forever ago, back in the halcyon days of 2012 when it first came out, and I am so thrilled to see it finally make it to Steam in an expanded format. The Sea Will Claim Everything is terrific, just all around brilliant. Great writing, great jokes, great philosophizing. The best part is the way the game keeps blowing itself up over and over; every time you think you know what's going on, the camera pulls back, the scope gets bigger, more adventure appears. It's such a fun feeling of discovery. It was the first Lands of Dream game I tried, and I don't regret it for a second since it introduced me to the rest.

Shortly after I played The Sea Will Claim Everything, I remember reading the creators describe it as inspired by half forgotten shareware games on long lost demo discs, only The Sea Will Claim Everything actually has the rest of the game attached to it. That really stuck with me, because it's a perfect way to describe the game. The Sea Will Claim Everything is like all the adventure games I wanted to finish playing as a kid, but I finally get to explore the world beyond the end of demo screen.

Can't wait to see what's been tweaked and polished in this new version four years later. Welcome back.
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23 of 30 people (77%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: March 24
This is my favorite videogame, and I've played quite a few. I'm glad it's finally on Steam.

The journey to the Lands of Dream is one you must take yourself: You have to live it, be there, to understand. I recommend it to you, especially if you like point 'n' click adventures and slower-paced games. Take your time, explore, examine every nook and cranny, talk with all the lovable characters (which have actual depth, instead of being one-dimensional caricatures), and just enjoy the experience.
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16 of 20 people (80%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
5.2 hrs on record
Posted: March 24
The Sea Will Claim Everything is an impossibly charming adventure game with enough heart and quirk for five games. Look through a magic window in The Land of Dreams, a realm full of characters the likes of which you've never seen, and embark on a philosophical and emotional journey to save the Fortunate Isles from Lord Urizen.
I cannot speak highly enough about The Sea Will Claim Everything. This game will take you on a journey in ways that few others can, and the story it tells is unique and touching.
If you've ever enjoyed an adventure game, The Sea Will Claim Everything is something that you must experience.
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11 of 13 people (85%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.5 hrs on record
Posted: March 26
I knew about The Sea Will Claim Everything for some time but only now did I finally play it. Should have done it sooner.

TSWCE is a game full of whimsical charm. The Land of Dreams as a setting is a creative and engaging one filled with the strange and magical. There’s also obscene amounts of flavor text for things such as every book and mushroom in the game. The writing is filled with corny jokes and silliness that while it may not always hit is still really endearing. The game also has a really strong fairy tale/children’s story aesthetic and the music is great too. TSWCE is also a political fable, being very critical of the economic policies that led to the Great Recession of 2008 as well as reactionary ideologies in general. Philosophy is also a major part of TSWCE and the some of the game’s major themes are the dangers of ignorance, greed, and strict adherence to dogma and that one of the most important ways to make the world a better place is for people to be open to change and have an understanding and empathy for the people and world around them. This all done well and a major reason why is because the setting and characters have so much care put into them so that the message doesn’t envelop the narrative and instead works alongside it and they enhance each other.

Gameplaywise it’s more of a point and click game, the magic screen is your UI and most puzzles are more simple stuff such as item gathering, talking to people, and exploration. As the game tells you from the get-go it’s a bit of a slow paced game, but it’s still real engaging.

Overall TSWCE is a unique and enthralling game with a lot of heart and a well-crafted message.
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9 of 10 people (90%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
8.6 hrs on record
Posted: April 1
This is a game for all of us who..
...like games with a lot of soul and feels.
...have patience with slow starts and then get rewarded for it.
...enjoy reading a lot of funny item descriptions.
...want to relax while listening to really good music.
...don't mind a strong and well delivered political message.
...always read all the quest texts in World of Warcraft.
...like Brian Blessed.
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10 of 12 people (83%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
1.7 hrs on record
Posted: March 24
When I originally played The Sea Will Claim everything back in 2012, I really didn't know what to expect. It seemed like it was going for some quirky, artsy charm (and it is), but the amount of depth and world building here is kind of incredible. It's a game you can get lost in for hours. And I lost my whole night to it - several nights, in fact!

The primary focus of the game is on exploring and examining things, and there is a surprisingly large number of scenes to traverse. Every object has a unique description. And while they're not all profound, you have to appreciate the effort it took to write that many unique descriptions of mushrooms.

Be warned: there is a tremendous amount of text to read, and the art is all static. If that doesn't turn you off of the game, then jump right in. Say "hi" to Bob the Spider for me. Hopefully he won't devour you whole.
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10 of 12 people (83%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
1.1 hrs on record
Posted: March 26
I am amazed. TSWCE is pure glorious joy. Mine, when playing, and the creators', whose joy oozes out of every corner. The joy of a game full of personality, of invention, of depth. The joy of creation and of drama. There is so much content, both within (you see those rooms full of stuff in the screenshots? everything is clickable, up to every single different mushroom being described differently) and behind this game, and everything feels oh so great. Those felt-pen graphics? They're perfect. The music is fantastic. And the writing, well, is out of this world. I just started it and already am in love.
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