Design and then improve the ultimate mothership. Explore a persistent living galaxy populated by 200 unique captains that can do everything you can do. Survive the zombie infection and then fight them back. Make allies and start your own faction. Build your empire. Also includes Sandbox Mode.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (54 reviews) - 87% of the 54 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (702 reviews) - 81% of the 702 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: May 17, 2016

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Early Access Game

Get instant access and start playing; get involved with this game as it develops.

Note: This Early Access game is not complete and may or may not change further. If you are not excited to play this game in its current state, then you should wait to see if the game progresses further in development. Learn more

What the developers have to say:

Why Early Access?

“Important Note: SPAZ 2 is not a direct sequel to SPAZ 1. It is a new game with brand new gameplay mechanics but is set in the same universe with the same cast. SPAZ 2 is themed around scavenging and survival and the mechanics reflect that. Those looking for a direct SPAZ 1 sequel will not find it here. Those looking to try something new, certainly will find that. :)

We have been working on SPAZ 2 full time for almost 4 years. The single player campaign and sandbox modes are working, but we would like community suggestions for the tuning and for methods to improve the campaign flow. SPAZ 2 is built on an emergent living galaxy with 200 persistent captains, and the two of us here at MinMax just cannot explore all the dark corners of a galaxy on our own. In just the first week, we have already implemented many community suggestions that have made the game even better.”

Approximately how long will this game be in Early Access?

“We estimate between 6 and 12 months, but we won't mark SPAZ 2 as released until we feel that it is a complete game that we can be proud of. We are excited to see what players think of SPAZ 2 and to hear their ideas for improvements.”

How is the full version planned to differ from the Early Access version?

“A big focus right now will be doing a better job of teaching the player the many gameplay systems, particularly on the Starmap. So the tutorial content now as well as early progression is definitely in an Early Access state. Some people get it right away, but others struggle and we need to work on that.

Right now, the main cast voices are all synthesized. We expect to hire voice acting talent for most of the main cast for final, though if everyone loves the synthesized voices, this may change.

Throughout Early Access we will also be working on localization and will attempt to bring the game to Mac and Linux.

A vs. mode multiplayer. The ship to ship combat side of SPAZ 2 is just begging for multiplayer, and the preliminary work is done. We will spend time coming up with multiplayer modes with the community and a matchmaking solution. We will also likely have to rewrite the current multiplayer back end so expect this to take some time. Please do not purchase for multiplayer until multiplayer is ready.

Achievements and Trading Cards will come on line throughout Early Access.

Tuning, Tuning, Optimization, Tuning.

Stretch goals: VR and local coop. We have done a huge amount of multi layer gfx compositing that MAY make double camera rendering impossible now, but we will investigate solutions near the end of Early Access.”

What is the current state of the Early Access version?

“SPAZ 2 already has an ocean of depth and content. The combat mode and starmap mode are fully functional games in their own right, and all the systems are interacting with one another.

There are over 90 ship and station parts as well as over 30 weapons.

There are 200 persistent and unique AI captains.

The AI captains remember, make friends and enemies, join and leave factions and do just about everything the player can. The AI captains already have over 90 relations events that they can monitor on the starmap.

There is a full levelup perk system that is unlimited at the top end.

There is a lore system that bridges the gap between SPAZ 1 and SPAZ 2.

You can join a faction, build your own, or just remain a filthy neutral.”

Will the game be priced differently during and after Early Access?

“The price may be increased on release from early access.”

How are you planning on involving the Community in your development process?

“As with SPAZ 1, the community will be a vital part of the completion process for SPAZ 2. We at MinMax do not have a monopoly on good ideas and had a great experience upgrading SPAZ 1 with community ideas and support.

We have maintained and active forum presence over the last two years while SPAZ 2 has been on the coming soon list. As we have brought new features online, we have discussed them with the community and have gotten their input. Some suggestions have even already made it into the game. We have tried to be as open as possible with our ideas and progress and will continue to do so throughout Early Access and beyond.”
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Recent updates View all (13)

July 21

The Sneaky Update! v0.5.0

Starmap Cloaking:

Players have been having problems with getting overwhelmed with attack bounties on their mothership. This is usually a result of making some enemies early on and that tends to snowball, so we wanted to give you all a way to get out of a sticky spot, but without undermining the consequences for making enemies. To solve this, Carl has invented something new, the Starmap Cloak.

Starmap Cloaking automatically unlocks at level 6. Normally you will get a perk at this level, but we also made it so that old saves with a level six or higher will also be able to cloak.

When you cloak, anyone chasing you will lose targeting on you and will re-evaluate their goals and move on to some other target.

Cloaking costs quite a bit of extra rez to use, about twice the cost of normal flight (on top of your current flight mode.)

You can stay cloaked as long as you want if you have enough rez to maintain the cloak.

If you start combat or any action that takes time on the starmap, like Collecting goons at a resource node, or repairing, or joining a fight, you will become visible.

Once your cloak is down, it takes time to regenerate (currently 60 starmap seconds) and you will not be able to recloak while the field is regenerating, so use cloak wisely.


Cheat Mode:

Cheat Engine has been pretty popular for people to modify their game, and we wanted to make that a little easier and less error prone than twiddling random memory :) So we have added a cheat menu to the game just like we had in SPAZ 1.

If you use cheats, your achievements will be disabled for that game moving forward, but if you load any save game without cheats active, then achievements will be back online.

Current Cheats:
Level Up
Add 100 Goons
Add 1000 Rez
Add 10000 Scrap

Cheats can be used over and over so if you hammer the buttons, you will get pretty rich pretty fast.

The Cheat button is Alt-F7 as in SPAZ 1 for old time's sake :)


Moving Forward:
So this marks the end of our first task list here:
https://steamcommunity.com/app/252470/discussions/0/364042262889515926/

We will be posting shorter tasks list moving forward so that we are better able to jump on good ideas as they come in vs. completing a long list before being able to act. We already know what the next two items will be as well and here they are.


Current Design/Implementation Goals #2

Core Synergies:
One big request has been to move ship designs away from the ideal L or T shapes that have emerged, and we couldn't agree more. We want to add a lot more thought to balancing ship systems power vs. raw firepower, and to that end, we are adding Core Synergies.

A Core Synergy is a stats bonus for connecting multiple cores together. So now not only will the shape of your spine matter, but also which core you put where in the spine, because you want the biggest bonuses on the best cores with the most active connections. The better ship construction update v0.3.0 will help a lot to keep this process streamlined.

The more cores connected to a core, the higher the bonus. It will require some tuning, but we are thinking along the lines of 3 connections is about equal to the current cores' output as of today. This means a ship that is a lone line or an L is going to have diminished systems power vs lots and lots of firepower as it has now, so it will be a balance. We also don't want the most viable ship to become a solid 3x3 brick, the downside of the brick of course will be the lack of weapons available.

We are really excited to see what the core synergies bring, and they will be the next task we work on.


Bigger Better Bandits:
Another huge request has been to make the bandits viable into mid to late game. In their current incarnation, their purpose is to be feeder fish that bridge the early gap into fighting other captains, but as we have learned, some people don't want to be the pirate and we hear you. All too often we have read stories of players battling bandits well into the double digit levels and that is just not fun, so we want to fix that!

Keep in mind, this is Space PIRATES and Zombies and fighting the 200 Captains needs to remain the most lucrative experience because it plugs into the whole faction reputation system that is the backbone of the living universe, but we do want to provide extra options.

The new bandits design is still in its infancy but there are some things that we do know.

Bandits are going to level up.
Bandits are going to be able to equip some of the parts they steal for nastier designs.
There will be medium and large scrap parts added for the bigger bandit ships (player can use too)
The word Bandit Chief has been uttered.

Thanks to everyone for their great suggestions and sticking with us!

Andrew (Blorf) and Richard(Narlak)

16 comments Read more

July 14

The Mining/Side Objective Update! v0.4.0

The Rogue Mining Op:

There have been quite a few requests to get some SPAZ 1 style rock picking into SPAZ 2. We spent some time and think we have come up with a good way to handle this. We now have Rogue Mining Ops.

They appear over time on the Starmap and will also expire. This expiry and limited nature is meant to make them feel special when you find one, since it is a free source of a limited supply of Rez. You also cannot grind them endlessly, which was a big problem in SPAZ 1. We want people to use all of the tools we created to survive in the Galaxy, and not to grind one event, so Mining Ops will expire over time.

So here's how they work. You will find a pretty dense asteroid field filled with a new asteroid type. They are purplish and veiny and have little bits of Rez inside them. Blow them up, and you can go collect the Rez. You are free to do this and none of the miners in the level will care.

But...

There are also crates littered around the asteroid field (they are hard to find on purpose) These crates have large amounts of Rez inside them. If you steal from these crates, then the miners will get very angry. They will then call their friends and maintain a certain population that will pummel your ship until all their reinforcements are used up. If you survive, you can simply warp out as normal (if things get too tense, there is a warp gate too)

If you decide to keep pushing it, stealing from more crates, the alert level will rise and a larger fleet will warp in. If you survive that, then you can warp out. If you are really nuts, you can go for the last few crates and an even larger fleet will warp in. It is up to you to only steal as much as you feel comfortable with and pay the price if you are too greedy.


Side Objectives (Little Blue Missions)

We have added a side objective system to help teach players the intricacies of the game. Each objective has a little brain that runs and evaluates if it is a good time to teach a certain game mechanic. Some preconditions are simple, like being level 12 or having zombies in the galaxy, while others are more unusual like having 3 loose junk parts triggering a quest to get rid of the garbage weighing you down. The real goal here is to provide the kind of advice that you would get if one of us was standing next to you providing hints on different ways to tackle problems and pointing out less used systems.

Some objectives will come and go as the brain detects and then undetects good situations for completing that objective. Objectives can also be postponed if you don't want to complete them right now and want to free up another slot for a different objective to become active. Not to worry, postponed objectives will come back after a while.

Here is a list of the objectives we have now:
Bounty a Captain
Bounty a Starbase
Bounty a Zombie Starbase
Collect your Stockpile
Extort a Captain
Fund a Starbase Expansion
Hire a Wingman
Attack a Captain
Destroy a Starbase
Attack a Zombie
Do a Mining Op
Pay a Tribute
Start a Raid
Try the Arena
Pay Reparations
Duel a captain
Recruit a Captain to your Faction
Use a build Incentive
Join a Fight
Jettison unused Junk

We are hoping the objectives help to get people to try all of these things at least once to see how they poke the simulation in new ways.

Additionally: (Better building tutorials)

We have revised the intro building tutorial to make it hopefully more bullet proof when it comes to learning how to add and remove parts on ships. We still teach the old tractor beam method here since you need to know how to use this if you are ever in battle. The tractor beam method is the basic fallback construction method.

We also added a tutorial for the new method that will trigger the first time that you enter the inventory level from the Starmap on your own.


So this update was mainly about getting people playing the game a little better/deeper with a little extra ambient mining op flavor for those who already know how to play :)

We hope you enjoy!

Andrew(Blorf) and Richard(Narlak)

30 comments Read more
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Reviews

“The combat in this feels very very good you guys. Feels very nice, very fluid.”
Brian Rubin, Space Game Junkie

“Oh Yes, I love the comic relief in the game. Just about everything is oozing with that kind of charm.”
ReformistTM

“MinMax Games has slammed down in front of us the most innovative and exciting experiences I have had the privilege of playing in a long time.”
Deluks Gaming

About This Game

In SPAZ 2 you must survive in an evolving post apocalyptic Galaxy. The zombie threat is defeated, infrastructure has collapsed, fuel is scarce, and scavenging means survival.

Initially the Galaxy contains hundreds of fleets, each trying to survive. AI captains do everything the player can. The player is not special and is not the center of the Galaxy.

As resource scarcity becomes critical, ships come into conflict just to survive. Factions may form for protection or split due to starvation. Old friends must become fodder.

Stronger factions establish and defend territories, set up resource hubs, and establish star bases. Weaker factions may resort to banditry. Each captain is unique, persistent, and shapes the Galaxy.

When factions meet, combat is usually the result. While the strategic side of SPAZ 2 is about exploration, territorial control, and faction building, the action side of SPAZ 2 is about ship construction, tactics, and salvage.

Combat creates damaged ships and dead crew, but it also provides new salvaged parts. All the parts in SPAZ 2 are modular and randomly generated. If you see something you like, break it off an enemy, grab it with your tractor beam, and connect it to your ship. Ship construction can be done live during battles, though sometimes beating an enemy to death with their broken wing is also fun.

Back on the star map, battles will attract other captains looking for salvage. Take your new parts and run. Upgrade, repair, and prepare to fight another day, for darker threats are about to emerge.

Key Features:
  • Two hundred persistent Captains that are able to do everything the player can, including forming dynamic factions, building structures, controlling territory, and going to War.
  • A true living galaxy that is not player centric. It will develop differently each game through the interactions of the agents.
  • Build your own faction from nothing.
  • Randomly generated modular parts. Build the mothership that suits your play style, on the fly, in seconds. Every part has its own unique stats that contribute to the mothership. Every part has its own hull integrity and damage states. Every part is a real, working, ship component.
  • Strategic ship building. The mass, location and shape of parts all matter. If a part blocks a turret, it will not fire. If a ship is too long, it will turn slowly. Too many engines will mean too little power for weapons. Every design choice counts.
  • A fully physics based 3d environment where everything is destructible, takes damage from impacts, can be grabbed and even thrown at enemies with the tractor beam.
  • Natural movement and controls. Movement is on a 2d plane and screen relative, much like an FPS. The combat feels like huge pirate ships battling on an ocean. Focus on tactical positioning and manage system power to unleash hell at the right moment.
  • Epic ship to ship battles. Tear the enemy apart piece by piece over minutes, instead of seconds.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP/Vista/7/8/10
    • Processor: 2.6 Ghz Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 1GB 3D DirectX 9 Compatible video card
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 1 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows XP/Vista/7/8/10
    • Processor: 3.1 Ghz Dual Core
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 2GB 3D DirectX 9 Compatible video card
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 1 GB available space
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Very Positive (54 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (702 reviews)
Recently Posted
Hispeeday
( 17.2 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 27
If you liked SPAZ 1, but disliked the grind, go play SPAZ 2.
If you prefer tactical play in the form of Sid Meier's Starships, with a good portion of hands-on fighting in between, go play SPAZ 2.
If you like slaving away min-max'ing your ship until it becomes the most powerful build it can be (for now), go play SPAZ 2.

That said, coming from SPAZ 1 originally, I really like the new look. The music is great. The gameplay is solid. The 2 man dev team is busy pumping out patch (hotfixes) after patch (features).

The only (slightly) dark shadow is the beginning of the game.. the learning curve seems a bit steep as the game is now. But the devs have this topic on their roadmap already.

If you like an Early Access game with actually active developing, go buy SPAZ 2 and enjoy the ♥♥♥♥ out of it. Oh, and there are zombies ;-)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Silverhaze
( 18.1 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 27
Really like this game, just missing end game depth. Once you have the best items things get boring real quick.
The main quest is poor and basicly consists of all the things you do in sandbox mode, nothing special added ....

Combat is good and fun, but really lacks tactic depth. Once you figure out how things works it comes down to flying arround and boosting shields at the right moment, the autotarget does everything for you.

Get this game for 15-20 hours of fun and keep your fingers crossed waiting for the multiplayer.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
BoneCrusher036
( 28.2 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 26
I devoured this game, this game was my b*tch until 4 in the morning for a week straight. so do i recommend this game? heck yeah!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
falsetruth1988
( 73.6 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 26
Great game, absolutely love the constant humor injected intot he game EVERYwhere, find myself laughing of the simplest NPC comments like NOPE nope, game play is fun, some bugs that are being worked out, but if your saying not to buy then your wrong, either support the team to help make the game better if you like or just stop gaming. Dev crew is constanting working on adding features and additional content while cleaning code, fixing bugs, this is a great game with a great and dedicated dev crew behing them.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Mantissa
( 8.5 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 25
I want to preface this review by saying that not only am I a big fan of the original SPAZ, I also respect and admire MINMAX for experimenting with their original model and stepping outside the box for their sequel.

That being said, I think they stepped out of one box and into another.

SPAZ 2 retains the charmingly witty-yet-stupid writing and dialogue of the original game that reminds of a Saturday-morning cartoon. The aesthetics have also remained the same; blurry textures composed of screamingly high contrast colors that bore into your retinas. On top of that, the from-scratch gameplay is also retained from the original game, where you start with practically nothing and build your empire on top of that. Aside from the actual space combat, these things define SPAZ pretty well, and if that's all you're looking for, you won't be disappointed.

This is all SPAZ 2 has in common with the original, however. In the transition to 3d, much has changed. You now get to fly and build the mothership, you are now the biggest fish in the sea. Right Hooks and Tugs are tiny compared to the hulking, glorious piece of junk that is your ship. You start off with a scaffold looking like it was built entirely out of old bicycles by an inpatient from a mental hospital. Over the course of the entire game, from start to finish, you will upgrade from bicycles to smashed car-shaped objects.

This modular mothership, along with the ability to establish and govern starbases, seems to be giving us what we didn't have, and wanted in the original SPAZ. An interstellar empire. Flying the Clockwork. AI that don't run face-first into the enemy's largest ship and die instantly, wasting thousands of Rez. Actually, that's still a thing, but they only waste small amounts of scrap instead because they're only piloting small fighter ships.

This lends a much more strategic feel to the game. And I'd call that an advantage. However, much was lost in the transition:

First of all, everything feels like it's about the same size. Gone are the days of warping into a battlefield and attempting to take down a ship 20 times your size with bombing runs. The smallest mothership is maybe 1/4 the size of the largest. Heck, even space stations just look like circular, spinning motherships that can't move.

Next, ship design doesn't matter as much. In the original, when you were restricted to chassis with a set number of module slots and module types, you knew exactly how your own ships worked, and their strengths and weaknesses. When you looked at an enemy ship, you could distinctly see what modules were attached to it (unless it was cloaked), and you knew how those weapons would affect your fleet. What weapons a ship had often determined whether you'd try to take it down for its blueprints, or flee with your tail between your legs.

Now, you pretty much slap whatever module will fit on your mothership and has the most stars. Because of the randomness of parts, both in terms of their perks (the bonuses they confer to your ship, like shield strength, speed, health, etc.), and in terms of the weaponry on them (cannons, beams, the works), both when you're scavenging, and when you're shopping at space stations, it's very unlikely that you're going to find exactly the part you're looking for.

I get what they were going for here; you're a scavenger among scavengers. It's not about what you want, it's about what works. But, that being said, it isn't very compelling. The chances of me finding a part that: a) looks the way I want it to look, b) has a weapon that I want on it, and c) has the bonuses that I want (which I don't even keep track of anyways), is almost null. The chances of me finding *multiple parts* that I actually want are nonexistant.

This results in your mothership EITHER looking like a piece of trash, that has EITHER nice weapons OR nice stats, OR a mothership that looks nice and is completely worthless in terms of battlefield effectiveness. Yes, that was a nested either-or statement. And, usually, what ends up happening is you get a muddy mix of all of these things.

The end result is that you don't feel like the ship you're flying is *your* mothership, even though you built it piece-by-piece. It feels like you just cobbled together what the game gave you and now you're flying it around.

And, all of these things would be fine if they took advantage of the things they gained; We're in 3d now. There's a lot to explore, right?

Not... Really. You still fly your ship in 2d, while asteroids hover tantalizingly over and under you. You still effectively fight in 2d; you can't go over or under an enemy ship. The battles are more bland than the original game. Explosive barrels don't matter as much, and neither do asteroids. They feel much more staged, 2-4 ships warp in, 1-3 ships warp out. The outcome is largely determined by your stats, and who warps in with you. Positioning can matter, but ships are so random and cobbled together that it's hard to tell when you're facing directly into an enemy's broadside, or if the other side is even worse. You can't "get used to" an enemy faction. You can't take advantage of a ship's slow turning speed and its blind spots. You really can't dodge missiles anymore. There is no longer a cloaking system (except for in the star map, where it doesn't really matter), and "big" weapons like Mass Bombs don't feel as significant.

That's what it is. A lot of elements have lost their character. Rez is no longer the rainbow-colored candy it was, now it's just a generic purple blob that you pick up. Finding a new color of Rez stone felt like moving to a different level. Things are worth more now. Ships are bigger. Now it's just numbers on a screen.

Goons have gotten even less important. You no longer scavenge for rescue pods, or steal from hotels; just numbers on a screen. You need to maintain a minimum number of goons, and you shouldn't have too manygoons.

Finding the last blueprint to a weapon you really want is no longer a thing. Sometimes you stumble across a part that has a unique weapon on it, and you get to use that one part, and you will never find that same weapon ever again. And if you do, it's going to be on a worthless part.

The game feels smaller. You can cross the whole starmap in a matter of minutes, faster towards the start of the game and slower towards the end (the opposite of the original game), and you probably won't be attacked.

It's not a bad game. I just don't see why I would play it over the original SPAZ, which has much more crisp, interesting RPG gameplay and gunplay. Or Istrolid, which offers the modularity and customizability of SPAZ 2 with much faster, more satisfying top-down gameplay. Or why I would play it over Dreadnought, or Fractured Space, which are full-blown third person space shooters with interesting tactical gameplay and the advantage of other players.

SPAZ 2 seems to be a mashup of various genres, and sadly, it doesn't work, at least not for me.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
ShooterHD1
( 38.6 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 24
Spaz 2 is a great game i finnished it with 38 hours. It has great replay values althought is is extreamly hard in the beginning (after lvl5) but the moment you get your stratagy right u will be the boss. I loved the story line and i cant wait for multiplayer but i would like it if u could equip weapons on your wing man, (i love the ending of the game it is realy fun)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Meks
( 3.0 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 23
While i enjoyed the first game in the series, this one i do not care for. You spend very little time doing anything besides staring at the tactical map and watching the ship icons fly around while out on one of three types of arrands (all of which amount to click here on map, click harvest, move on to next node, click harvest, etc, etc).

The ship to ship combat looks very pretty and is mostly fun to play at first, though it tends to be slow paced and has numerous annoying mechanics built in. The reloading mechanic in particular is irritating to the point of frustration. And it makes no sense at all in ship-based combat. Even the ingame tutorial basically says "dont question why it works this way, just roll with it." Having to stop in the middle of combat and spend 15s reloading the laser beam weapons on your giant capital ship? Seriously?

The ship customization aspect is interesting though your creative options are strictly limited not by available modules so much as by arbitrary level restraints to keep the player from getting to powerful too fast.

There is little depth to the tech research aspect of the game. It pretty much amounts to: level up, spend talent point on one of 4 possible perks to modify stats/performance of your ship. Shield recharge, engine boost, etc.

As was aluded to in the first paragraph, the resource gathering aspect of the game is shallow (even more so than in the first game). Most actions in the game award one of three resource types. "Mining" consists of flying to a node on the tac-map and telling your ship to harvest everything. Which takes about 4-5 seconds and may or may not result in you getting jumped by the lightning fast blitzkreig ambush of some NPC that was half the galaxy away when you started the harvest cycle. It is the same with the Rez and Data point collection nodes. Though the resources can also be collected from combat. You can fly to special types of mining nodes and shoot them with your capital ship weapons to possibly spawns resources. But this is hilariously inefficient and only seems to have been added as an afterthought.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Realitylost
( 15.9 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 21
SO MANY UPDATES!
I played the first spaz and fell in love with it instantly.
This game has so much pontential that im fine loosing another 2-3 years of having no life to play this game :D
Helpful? Yes No Funny
bear
( 56.9 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 18
SPAZ 2 is an excellent game that I highly recommend. The action oriented gameplay will keep the casual gamer entertained while the strategy, resource management, ship design, variety of weapons/components, factions, and options allows players to go as deep as they wish.

For a game in early access with a two person development team, SPAZ 2 comes off as highly polished and immensely playable (Triple A gaming companies should take notes). In the 50+ hours I have played so far, I have experienced no bugs, crashes, framerate chugging, visual artifacts, or any other evidence of cut corners or rushing. The user interface is clean and intuitive. The controls feel tight and responsive. Ship combat is extremely satisfying (immersive battles with multiple enemies and allies, battle damage, beautiful explosions / debris, vibrant graphics, unique and memorable art and scenery, unique weapons allowing a variety of approaches to combat). The sandbox mode allows you to customize your experience from the vanilla story mode as well.

The development team is very responsive to the community and attentive to any reasonable criticisms. At this point, updates are mostly adding final touches to the game as well as community requested additional content and features - not desperate hot fixes to address game breaking bugs.

I found the tutorials and story mode satisfying as well. However, I believe the promised addition of voice acting will significantly enhance the story.

Criticisms:

- Some weapon symbols in the inventory menus are difficult to distinguish from one another.
- The number of ships allowed per battle encounter seems low.
- For those looking to maximize their ship's threat, the ship design is limited.
- After the zombie threat is dealt with, no other equal or greater challenges / events appear (I usually start a new playthrough shortly after).
- Max level starbases are incredibly strong when attacked directly by the player, but are laughably easy to destroy when attacked by the A.I.

I really had to strain to come up with these criticisms. They are the smallest nitpicks and trifles surrounding a solid and gloroius core. Considering the price, current content, and developer dedication, you can't go wrong. Just buy it already.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
ComaD
( 37.9 hrs on record )
Early Access Review
Posted: July 17
The gameplay is fun and the modular component system is unique and interesting. I can't wait for some of the upcoming features the devs have mentioned.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
9 of 11 people (82%) found this review helpful
Recommended
59.7 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 7
As of writing this, I've spent 60 hours with the game over 1 campaign and 1 sandbox. The game version as of writing this is 0.3.2.


If one comes to this game ready for a distinct experience in the genres it touches, albeit a little bit of a mashup, they are more likely to enjoy the game than not.

202 captains, 53 starbases (territories), 7 factions total, including the player's ability to create their own faction, ship part choices to match the 5 human AI factions in dimensions, turret locations and visuals, a short list of weapons each part can sport that allow for a fairly diverse choice of combat tactics. Just some of the reasons one can enjoy the game for.

All this and the game is expected to receive more content, along with balancing and other associated tweaks. As it is now, don't come expecting a full game, as it is not (seriously, this has to be mentioned).

Objectively pretty good, subjectively pretty awesome, if you like modularity, diversity, spacey stuff, consider this as a potential purchase, at the very least.
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
56.9 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 18
SPAZ 2 is an excellent game that I highly recommend. The action oriented gameplay will keep the casual gamer entertained while the strategy, resource management, ship design, variety of weapons/components, factions, and options allows players to go as deep as they wish.

For a game in early access with a two person development team, SPAZ 2 comes off as highly polished and immensely playable (Triple A gaming companies should take notes). In the 50+ hours I have played so far, I have experienced no bugs, crashes, framerate chugging, visual artifacts, or any other evidence of cut corners or rushing. The user interface is clean and intuitive. The controls feel tight and responsive. Ship combat is extremely satisfying (immersive battles with multiple enemies and allies, battle damage, beautiful explosions / debris, vibrant graphics, unique and memorable art and scenery, unique weapons allowing a variety of approaches to combat). The sandbox mode allows you to customize your experience from the vanilla story mode as well.

The development team is very responsive to the community and attentive to any reasonable criticisms. At this point, updates are mostly adding final touches to the game as well as community requested additional content and features - not desperate hot fixes to address game breaking bugs.

I found the tutorials and story mode satisfying as well. However, I believe the promised addition of voice acting will significantly enhance the story.

Criticisms:

- Some weapon symbols in the inventory menus are difficult to distinguish from one another.
- The number of ships allowed per battle encounter seems low.
- For those looking to maximize their ship's threat, the ship design is limited.
- After the zombie threat is dealt with, no other equal or greater challenges / events appear (I usually start a new playthrough shortly after).
- Max level starbases are incredibly strong when attacked directly by the player, but are laughably easy to destroy when attacked by the A.I.

I really had to strain to come up with these criticisms. They are the smallest nitpicks and trifles surrounding a solid and gloroius core. Considering the price, current content, and developer dedication, you can't go wrong. Just buy it already.
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7 of 8 people (88%) found this review helpful
Recommended
216.4 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 10
This game is awesome and has so much potential. From different weapon/ship configurations to the different ways to politically handle the competition and make money, there are so many ways to play. I loved the original SPAZ but I am happy with the direction this game is going (procedural universe). To the devs: I would love to see more configuration options for the ship/space station size and weapons.
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6 of 7 people (86%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.2 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 15
Give SPAZ2 about an hour to get its hooks into you. Once you're through the opening sequence (that, note, starts with a fake Game Over) you're into the world proper. As with Starpoing Gemini 2, Rebel Galaxy and others of its ilk, you'll manage resources, kill things, and grow your capabilities.

It's the ship building that elevates this though... the ability to complete pull apart your ship and pop on new weapons or engines or whatever else there is. Flying around in a garbage pile has never been so much fun.

Also the writing is hilarious! It's just that the voices are computerised at the moment but expect that to change at some point.

Try it, it's fantastic :)
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
16.1 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 15
I love this game and I mean adore it but theres a feature that really bugs me the zombies how if they infect a commander you cant uninfect without killing the alpha zombie base I wish there was a long annoying way to cure the commanders like paying 10000 scrap for a antidote witch you have to blast the guy to pieces and then he his a quarter of the way cured and you haves to do that 3 more times but you keep the antidote till the final time killing and he's cured then he adores you with 99 relations or something
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
15.9 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 21
SO MANY UPDATES!
I played the first spaz and fell in love with it instantly.
This game has so much pontential that im fine loosing another 2-3 years of having no life to play this game :D
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9 of 14 people (64%) found this review helpful
Recommended
76.4 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: June 30
tl;dr: I recommend Space Pirates and Zombies 2!

SPAZ 2 is a delicious game. I recommend it; it's well worth its asking price! Unlike many EARLY ACCESS games, SPAZ 2 is a fully-playable diamond-in-the-rough with its polishing process currently well-underway. That's the best reason for Early Access after all, isn't it? To enable Steam's larger community to test a fully-working game, utilize the community's input for suggestion+implementation of features and actively take a good/great game and make it great/even better?

WHAT I THOUGHT BEFORE PLAYING SPAZ 2:
I loved the original Space Pirates and Zombies (and Bounty Hunters!) game, but the first couple of SPAZ 2 gameplay videos left me uneasy. I thought, Oh no! What have they done!? That looks strange and, frankly, not very fun. Fortunately, however, I was mistaken and my worries were unwarranted. The devs had made a great first game and they delivered on their second game also, which brings me to...

WHAT I THINK NOW:
SPAZ 2 retains the qualities that made SPAZ fun. What appeared to be an odd-looking mess of gameplay is actually very intuitively-controlled, easy-to-understand, and enjoyable! The many hours I've played SPAZ 2 have been very actively-spent. Despite that, I'm still on my first campaign/story-mode character/ship!

I've been actively exploring the game, killing bandits for fun and profit and to garner approval from the local NPCs, bribing those disgruntled captains who have seemed to want to attack me a lot (enough to make alliances with their factions, even), finding members of my own faction who are good starbase leaders rather than abandoning their starbase and running off and trying to battle everyone else instead, allowing the "danger rating" of their starbase to decrease.

(Yes! If I assign you, NPC-who-shall-not-be-named, to manage a starbase and you do a poor job, I will assign another, less-aggressive or otherwise better-qualified NPC in your stead!)

I've noticed some complaints that this game focuses on multiplayer (?). I didn't even know that multiplayer was an option, and I still think it's single-player only. SPAZ 2 is in early access and if MP is a planned thing I guess I'll probably find out sometime. Right now I'm enjoying the features the devs are adding with each update and appreciating the fact that they waited until this game was fully playable before putting it into early access! The process reminds me a lot of SPAZ, which was great fun before the Bounty Hunters were added later, providing even more depth and fun! Not that the two games are the same, with this one taking place years after the events in SPAZ 1 and incorporating different (but still familiar) mechanics.

Sometimes I've been murdered by a relentless NPC captain who hates me for some reason, have reloaded my last save, replayed the battle, and it has unfolded completely differently. The same can be said for some of the practice levels offered at each starbase (but those involve simulated in-game ships and no actual in-game death).

AM I REVIEWING SPAZ 2 TOO SOON?
Do some other gamers' complaints stem from things they find or have found in the Sandbox mode? I haven't played that mode—yet—and won't know until I try it.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
22.6 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 3
Nice combate game play. The new ship parts lack in high level appearance, is difficult to find new parts to better your ship.
Overall its a good game to pass the time
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.0 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 4
Let me just start by saying this game is pretty differant from the first one, and its a good thing, they have really made a great follow up to SPAZ with the second installment. Combat is very fun and rewarding, the story is entertaining and flows well and the controls and star map are really well put together. If you havent played the first game jumping right into this one is no big deal. Great game and if they support this as well as they did the first its only going to get better from here.
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6 of 9 people (67%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
8.5 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Posted: July 25
I want to preface this review by saying that not only am I a big fan of the original SPAZ, I also respect and admire MINMAX for experimenting with their original model and stepping outside the box for their sequel.

That being said, I think they stepped out of one box and into another.

SPAZ 2 retains the charmingly witty-yet-stupid writing and dialogue of the original game that reminds of a Saturday-morning cartoon. The aesthetics have also remained the same; blurry textures composed of screamingly high contrast colors that bore into your retinas. On top of that, the from-scratch gameplay is also retained from the original game, where you start with practically nothing and build your empire on top of that. Aside from the actual space combat, these things define SPAZ pretty well, and if that's all you're looking for, you won't be disappointed.

This is all SPAZ 2 has in common with the original, however. In the transition to 3d, much has changed. You now get to fly and build the mothership, you are now the biggest fish in the sea. Right Hooks and Tugs are tiny compared to the hulking, glorious piece of junk that is your ship. You start off with a scaffold looking like it was built entirely out of old bicycles by an inpatient from a mental hospital. Over the course of the entire game, from start to finish, you will upgrade from bicycles to smashed car-shaped objects.

This modular mothership, along with the ability to establish and govern starbases, seems to be giving us what we didn't have, and wanted in the original SPAZ. An interstellar empire. Flying the Clockwork. AI that don't run face-first into the enemy's largest ship and die instantly, wasting thousands of Rez. Actually, that's still a thing, but they only waste small amounts of scrap instead because they're only piloting small fighter ships.

This lends a much more strategic feel to the game. And I'd call that an advantage. However, much was lost in the transition:

First of all, everything feels like it's about the same size. Gone are the days of warping into a battlefield and attempting to take down a ship 20 times your size with bombing runs. The smallest mothership is maybe 1/4 the size of the largest. Heck, even space stations just look like circular, spinning motherships that can't move.

Next, ship design doesn't matter as much. In the original, when you were restricted to chassis with a set number of module slots and module types, you knew exactly how your own ships worked, and their strengths and weaknesses. When you looked at an enemy ship, you could distinctly see what modules were attached to it (unless it was cloaked), and you knew how those weapons would affect your fleet. What weapons a ship had often determined whether you'd try to take it down for its blueprints, or flee with your tail between your legs.

Now, you pretty much slap whatever module will fit on your mothership and has the most stars. Because of the randomness of parts, both in terms of their perks (the bonuses they confer to your ship, like shield strength, speed, health, etc.), and in terms of the weaponry on them (cannons, beams, the works), both when you're scavenging, and when you're shopping at space stations, it's very unlikely that you're going to find exactly the part you're looking for.

I get what they were going for here; you're a scavenger among scavengers. It's not about what you want, it's about what works. But, that being said, it isn't very compelling. The chances of me finding a part that: a) looks the way I want it to look, b) has a weapon that I want on it, and c) has the bonuses that I want (which I don't even keep track of anyways), is almost null. The chances of me finding *multiple parts* that I actually want are nonexistant.

This results in your mothership EITHER looking like a piece of trash, that has EITHER nice weapons OR nice stats, OR a mothership that looks nice and is completely worthless in terms of battlefield effectiveness. Yes, that was a nested either-or statement. And, usually, what ends up happening is you get a muddy mix of all of these things.

The end result is that you don't feel like the ship you're flying is *your* mothership, even though you built it piece-by-piece. It feels like you just cobbled together what the game gave you and now you're flying it around.

And, all of these things would be fine if they took advantage of the things they gained; We're in 3d now. There's a lot to explore, right?

Not... Really. You still fly your ship in 2d, while asteroids hover tantalizingly over and under you. You still effectively fight in 2d; you can't go over or under an enemy ship. The battles are more bland than the original game. Explosive barrels don't matter as much, and neither do asteroids. They feel much more staged, 2-4 ships warp in, 1-3 ships warp out. The outcome is largely determined by your stats, and who warps in with you. Positioning can matter, but ships are so random and cobbled together that it's hard to tell when you're facing directly into an enemy's broadside, or if the other side is even worse. You can't "get used to" an enemy faction. You can't take advantage of a ship's slow turning speed and its blind spots. You really can't dodge missiles anymore. There is no longer a cloaking system (except for in the star map, where it doesn't really matter), and "big" weapons like Mass Bombs don't feel as significant.

That's what it is. A lot of elements have lost their character. Rez is no longer the rainbow-colored candy it was, now it's just a generic purple blob that you pick up. Finding a new color of Rez stone felt like moving to a different level. Things are worth more now. Ships are bigger. Now it's just numbers on a screen.

Goons have gotten even less important. You no longer scavenge for rescue pods, or steal from hotels; just numbers on a screen. You need to maintain a minimum number of goons, and you shouldn't have too manygoons.

Finding the last blueprint to a weapon you really want is no longer a thing. Sometimes you stumble across a part that has a unique weapon on it, and you get to use that one part, and you will never find that same weapon ever again. And if you do, it's going to be on a worthless part.

The game feels smaller. You can cross the whole starmap in a matter of minutes, faster towards the start of the game and slower towards the end (the opposite of the original game), and you probably won't be attacked.

It's not a bad game. I just don't see why I would play it over the original SPAZ, which has much more crisp, interesting RPG gameplay and gunplay. Or Istrolid, which offers the modularity and customizability of SPAZ 2 with much faster, more satisfying top-down gameplay. Or why I would play it over Dreadnought, or Fractured Space, which are full-blown third person space shooters with interesting tactical gameplay and the advantage of other players.

SPAZ 2 seems to be a mashup of various genres, and sadly, it doesn't work, at least not for me.
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