Hack ‘n’ Slash is a puzzle action game about hacking -- reprogram object properties, hijack global variables, hack creature behavior, and even rewrite the game’s code. The only way to win is not to play...by the rules!
User reviews: Mostly Positive (187 reviews)
Release Date: Sep 9, 2014

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Recommended By Curators

"Hack 'n' Slash mostly nails the new things it tries, but stumbles on the simple stuff, making it fun, but flawed."
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Recent updates View all (7)

October 27

Price Drop and New Bundle Option!

Hey guys, as you may have noticed, Hack n Slash has a new lower price and bundle option to celebrate today's release of Spacebase DF9. It's fitting, as these games shared a journey from our community-voted Amnesia Fortnight game jam, to being funded by Indie Fund and friends, to becoming Steam Early Access titles, and now being finished games.

So if you haven't already grabbed Hack n Slash, you can now do so for the lower price of $13.37 or as a bundle with Spacebase DF9 and both games' soundtracks at $24.99. And as a token of our appreciation to those who supported these games early, anyone who already owns Hack n Slash will be getting a copy of Spacebase for free and vice versa. ENJOY!!

56 comments Read more

October 10

Hack n Slash wins Indiecade Grand Jury Award!

Woohoo, we just won the big Grand Jury award at Indiecade!! Thanks so much to you the community for helping make the game what it is today. It's a super weird one and the feedback and support you lent us during Early Access was key to the game's success. Hopefully this will help bring some more folks into the game and the world of programming and lead to more crazy mods in the workshop community!

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About This Game

Hack ‘n’ Slash is a puzzle action game about hacking -- reprogram object properties, hijack global variables, hack creature behavior, and even rewrite the game’s code. The only way to win is not to play...by the rules!

The wizard has mandated that everyone confine themselves to the village, the castle armory has started to forge weapons so powerful that no one but guards are allowed to carry them, and anyone who attempts to find a sprite and demonstrate their bravery would face certain death. The new laws are for your own protection, but you don’t buy it. You’ll show everyone what “brave” means and, if you’re clever, maybe uncover the secret reasons why everything’s gone sideways.

Key Features:


  • Use in-game tools to hack the game while you’re playing it
    Your sword can hack the variables of objects. You find magic artifacts that allow you to tune global variables to your liking. Discover equipment that lets you see the game’s internal debug visualization to uncover things that weren’t meant to be seen.
  • Hack the code
    As you achieve advanced hacking mastery, you’ll be able to dive directly into the game’s assembly in the form of procedurally generated dungeons and modify the live-running code.
  • Make the game yours
    Puzzles have myriad solutions, many of which we haven’t anticipated. As you master the game’s hacking mechanics, you can mold and shape the game in whatever way you desire.
  • Crash it!
    You’re hacking the game for real! You can totally break it. Roll back in time to change the rules so the bugs don’t cause the world to fall apart, whether they’re yours or ours!

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP Service Pack 3
    • Processor: 1.7 GHz Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, ATI Radeon 4870 HD, Intel HD 3000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 2.2Ghz
    • Memory: 3 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 6850
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3. Some users may need to disable Steam overlay.
    Minimum:
    • OS: Snow Leopard 10.6.8 or later
    • Processor: Intel Core Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: ATI Radeon HD 4850, NVIDIA GeForce GT 120, Intel HD 3000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3
    Recommended:
    • OS: Lion 10.7.X
    • Processor: Intel Core i series processor
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 6770, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3. Some users may need to disable Steam overlay.
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
    • Processor: 1.7 GHz Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, ATI Radeon 4870 HD, Intel HD 4000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3
    Recommended:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS or higher
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 2.2Ghz
    • Memory: 3 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 6850
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3. Some users may need to disable Steam overlay.
Helpful customer reviews
102 of 135 people (76%) found this review helpful
9.7 hrs on record
Posted: October 29
Do not buy this game. This is not the programming game you want to buy. It is not worth the money, and it is not currently, by my standards, a finished puzzle game, much less one that teaches any reasonable amount of programming.

It is a beautiful idea for a game, and a very clever title for the idea. But it is not the game the idea would suggest exists. If you must buy it, wait for the game that purports to teach programming to at least be itself adequately programmed. That is not the game that is available right now.

Hack 'n' Slash is a game in which you swing your USB sword to, instead of slaying things, set their hit points to 0. I can offer no higher praise for the integration of the "hacking" in the game for the first few minutes of gameplay. Instead of attacking the turtle, you hack its allegiance so it becomes your ally. Instead of finding the right order of blocks to push for a block pushing puzzle, you simply hack the number of remaining pushes allowed for one block. Reprogramming the movement of the guards was hilarious.

Then, just as quickly as the fun begins, the clever puzzle design disintegrates.

The coding is still painfully inaccessible and unserviceable—if you're a programmer, it's boring and tedious for no apparent reason, and if you're not a programmer, there's no chance you'll really even understand the puzzle as it's presented. As an experienced programmer, putting together the clues using detailed understanding of how programming generally works got me through the "programming puzzles", but left me painfully frustrated by how obtuse they were guaranteed to be for someone who didn't automatically know that "HackBlock 1" is probably the same in-game object as "blocks[1]". I see no reason to relate a red letter 'a' directly to a red diamond symbol other than educated guesswork. A game which requires trial and error is fine, but a game that requires too much backtracking between trials and crashes when you don't know what you're doing is not a game that encourages learning.

The most frustrating thing for me was when I immediately saw the solution the programmers intended, but also that there were far more obvious and trivial solutions. If, instead of entering the prescribed passwords into locked gates, you decided to simply change the assign value from "false" to true, for instance, you bypass the intended lesson entirely. Not only are the puzzles poorly thought out, they don't even enforce the intended lesson. I can't imagine anything other than inexperienced players blundering their way through the "puzzles."

The game crashes when the built-in LUA interpreter falls apart, because instead of being a sandboxed interpreter, the game runs code you throw at it natively, and I wouldn't be surprised if the game wasn't a legitimate security vulnerability for getting admin access to the local machine. What's worse, the programming conventions used are distracting, if not outright confusing. The variables that are useful to hack aren't even always next to the lines of code they relate to, requiring mundane back calculation or walking around to find the right variable.

Imagine if a game that wasn't about programming presented these qualities: for instance, you found yourself in a hallway with five switches, and the purpose of the doors is only marginally explained to you. There is absolutely no feedback to tell you what each switch does, unless you've solved the puzzle, or unknowingly triggered a fail state. What's worse, these fail states cause you to lose any forward progress made not only on the current 5-switch puzzle, but also the 3-switch puzzles that you've managed to solve in the same hallway. This is not what I consider a good puzzle game, but it is exactly the sort of scenario Hack 'n' Slash unforgivingly drops players into. Where traditional games undergo thorough testing to prevent the player from causing crashes, Hack 'n' Slash markets the total (and completely unnecessary) instability of the game as a feature. Can you imagine an point and click adventure game that crashed when you used the wrong item on the wrong target? How is this fun for the player? Why aren't they simply preventing unnecessary modifications, and adding iteration limits and variable scopes to prevent accidents? The puzzles are poorly designed, and just aren't fun.

And now we get to the rest of the game. As far as adventure games go, this game isn't even half-baked: shoddy collision detection make movement a confusing dance, total lack of information on what can and can't be done makes even thinking about solutions total guesswork.Traditional adventure games have a series of breadcrumbs, and a useful assistant who makes sure the player is at least going in the right direction. Not so in this half-done game. Between acts the player is expected to know where they should romp for five minutes to get to the next destination, and while this could be "part of the puzzle" in some twisted logic the latter half of the game is a series of tedious activities: wander until you reach the next scripted destination, randomly permute code until success. Nothing is named in a useful fashion, nothing is provided, and the game gives you more ways to cause a crash than it does any meaningful direction towards a smart solution. There's invariably way too much information available as "clues," and the player has no idea what's useful and what's just there because the programmers thought it would be cool. I spend so much time wading through unnecessary details for reasons I don't understand to solve puzzles that aren't even intellectually challenging so much as they are a series of inside jokes. The final puzzles aren't so much arcane wizardry as they are exercises in variable tweaking, and there's not even any guide to explain which variables should really be tweaked to start with. Behaviors not explained before or after a particular puzzle are used and so players shouldn't even know to try the things the developers expect us to know.

As someone who actually studied computer science, incidentally, I take offense at what the game so loosely refers to as algorithms. None of the implementations are meaningfully quantifiable algorithms. This is what most saddens me, to be honest: there are so many beautiful, challenging, and meaningful problems in computer science that programming games could explore and teach. Even the final chapter of the game, purported to be a legitimate programming challenge with actual security applications, boils down to a series of password reading tricks used earlier, or the mundane "wander, hack, permute" process. I was hoping to maybe see some binary search, or some loop iteration, or even just simple mathematics to inject actual challenge into the game, but instead found myself going through the exact motions I go through when debugging ugly, poorly written code. "If x ==y continue" tells me nothing about how many lines are actually part of the if statement, by the way. LUA probably wouldn't have been my first choice as a language for making the code readable to nonprogrammers. Might have been smarter to create a simpler, if still Turing complete domain specific version of LUA that doesn't throw unfamiliar terms like jump statements and closure operations. I'm saddened by the possibility that LUA was chosen not because it's a beautiful, educational language but because it made executing user code easy (and highly destructive and universe-collapsing). I spent more time shaking my head at the programming choices than solving the puzzles, and even more time wondering why Double Fine failed to even make the non-programming parts of the game enjoyable. It plays like a very promising alpha, which would be encouraging, if the game wasn't being marketed as a full release.

This is not a programming game. This is not a well-programmed game. And what's worse, this is not even a good game. I'd save your money if I were you.
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19 of 30 people (63%) found this review helpful
5.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 28
I really enjoyed this game up until act 4 where the hacking puzzles devolved into "code algorithm" which is by far the most confusing and frustrating part of the game to someone who has no understanding of programing. There was only one video on you tube that explained what to change to beat the puzzles, but since this video came out the developers have decided to change the second cavestash bridge puzzle setup so people like myself with no programming background can't just follow the walkthrough.

I spent 2 hours trying to figure out the puzzle I was stuck on to no avail, and another 2 hours trying to find a walkthrough for the updated puzzle. There was probably less than an hour left in the game once I got past this BS.

So if your thinking about buying this game and you arn't a programmer, be prepared to be frustrated with these last few programming math puzzles where they whole hacking aspect of the game takes a total nose dive as a personal F-you to the player.
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6 of 7 people (86%) found this review helpful
2.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 5
I'm enjoying Hack 'n' Slash, but my view might be biased as I've studied computer science and I like Double Fine's style ;)
It's a pretty unique game idea - an rpg like game where you run around with an USB sword, hacking mobs and game properties around! Everything has the colorful and recognizable Double Fine look and feel, and of course ... the humor ;) I personally find the music of the game fitting and unintrusive.
I haven't played that much from the game, I haven't completed act 4 yet, but I definitely like what I see. The question is : how are people, unfamiliar with programming, gonna progress in the game - as the only obvious way to increase the difficulty is to make the code you need to change more complicated - and that might be, where the fun ends. On the other hand - is a game, how complicated can it get? It's not like it's computer science ... o wait :p Then again I also think, that in this day and age, everyone should be able to look at a code and get the general idea of what's going on :p
There is also mod support for the game and I can't wait to see what funny things the community will come up with!
TL:DR you can check my overview video, as I play through act 2 :
http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=337306243
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11 of 17 people (65%) found this review helpful
2.7 hrs on record
Posted: October 28
It my first view on this game.

If you:
  • learn programming
  • like strange/new type of games
  • love Double Fine games
    Take it. I loved it, may be you too.

    Else
    • stay away! You may not understand many funny things this game has in it.

      return 0 :)
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
11.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 29
I am going to cautiously recommend this game for programmers only.

While Hack 'n' Slash may appear to play like the old overhead Zelda games, it is a pure puzzle game. Direct attacks are impossible, there is no penalty for dieing, and you don't need fast reflexes.

I would give it a, perhaps generous, 7/10. I base this on averaging the 5/10 I would give it for non-programmers since they can only play the first half of the game, and 10/10 for programmers who may find it enjoyable.

Quite a bit of programming knowledge is assumed. Almost nothing is explained. At first, all you can do is alter the value of variables. Soon “if” statements and logical operators are introduced. The game spends quite a while at this level of sophistication, and an intelligent person that can read English can get by for the first half of the game.

Intelligence is not sufficient. Do you know what “function” (in the programming sense), “iteration”, “modulo”, and “closure” means? Do you know programmer catchphrases like “hack the planet” well enough to recognize them even when letters are missing and the words are rearranged? If not, you can't complete the last half of this game without a walkthrough. Playing with a walkthrough will be no fun, since there is nothing to the game other than solving the puzzles.

When the game does attempt to explain something, the explanations are often unhelpful, vague, and/or inaccurate. For example, the game hints that a closure is “when a function has a pet function”. That is unhelpful because it doesn't tell you what you can do with it, or 'what it's for'. Those features would help you use it to solve puzzles. It is vague because it neglects to mention that a closure is an anonymous function (a function without a name), and that it can contain references to the values of variables in the enclosing scopes of where it was created. Those features are why programmers care about closures. It's inaccurate because a closure can be returned by a function. It does not have to remain with the function that created it (that would be a nested function definition). If none of that made sense to you, that's fine. Just know that this game will not teach you to be a programmer.

It is perhaps for the best that the game does not teach programming, because the code you interact with appears to be produced by a Lua disassembler. There is no indention, and very little code structure. “goto” is heavily used. This does make the game challenging for programmers near the end, but it would teach bad practices.

For programmers the first half of the game will be far too easy. If you're creative you may be able to amuse yourself by solving the puzzles in roundabout or spectacular ways, but it is not required or rewarded.

Most programmers should find the last half of the game difficult, but mostly fair. Most of the difficulty comes from needing to debug (or carefully 'bug') code that is unfamiliar and poorly structured. This is a valuable skill.

The story is serviceable. Neither the plot nor the characters are very deep, but the ending is clever. I won't spoil it.

Some parts of the interface are very bad.

A minor, but constant, problem is overlapping text. This isn't just an eyesore. It's hard to find a particular book in a burning library when all the titles have other words printed over them. This could have been solved several ways. Text could be nudged the minimal distance from its centered position to avoid overlapping (the best solution I've come up with). Text could only appear when you mouseover something (likely a worse solution). Different colors could be used (probably the worst solution).

Source code (what a programmer writes to make a computer do things) is displayed two ways.

One view of the code is as mostly-text that should be familiar to most programmers. I say “mostly” text because there are colored diamonds scattered throughout. This form is used when you look at a 'signpost' for an algorithm before editing it. I had no problem with it.

The other view of the code is as a collection of machines connected with wires, with beams firing at them from colored diamonds. This form is used to make your changes to the code. It is, to put it bluntly, terrible. Each machine has some text on it. This text is so small as to be illegible. The machines are always arranged as a vertical line, causing the white lines indicating the control flow of the program to overlap, making it very difficult to understand. Even small amounts of code presented this way results in large rooms that make it almost impossible to get a sense of the overall structure of the code, and require a lot of time spent walking.

It's unfortunate that the text view wasn't used for everything.

The interface seems to have been designed with gamepads in mind. This makes editing the code slow and clumsy, and you occasionally have to type variable names and strings anyway. It would have been better if normal text editing had been used for everything.

The engine itself is fascinating. It appears to work by disassembling its own code, and letting you edit it while it runs. It's very resilient. If you make a mistake that would normally crash a program the game doesn't crash. You get a message about the world collapsing, and restart from the point where you entered the room as if you had died. This is even used in some traps late in the game. The code is version-controlled, and you can return to a previous version of it, at the cost of any progress (location change and items gained) you made since then, when you die or by using an item you get early on. That's nice if you mess things up too badly. It would have been nice to have buttons to view the original code for things, and the changes that were made (probably in unified diff format).

While this isn't the first programming game (RobotWars was released in the 1970's, and there may be older examples), it might be the first that shows how to get a non-programmer interested in programming. Editing the value of variables in the source code of BASIC games, and then proceeding to make more and more complex changes, are how I learned to program in the 1980's, and the way this game starts out. It's a pity that Hack 'n' Slash does such a poor job explaining things, and that the learning curve hits a brick wall so suddenly halfway through the game. Hopefully future games will use this as a model to improve upon, rather than as a sign that such games cannot work.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: November 8
TL;DR ----
This game has a great concept and art style but ultimately fails to provide a good gameplay experience.

Great concept that works for the start of the game. Later on it devolves into messy visual rooms of code that are more difficult to understand than actual code. Useless for someone without an understanding of coding concepts and for anyone else too simple to break through.

The story is rather dull and lacks direction. A huge amount of my time spent in this game is simply wandering around the world trying to figure out where to go rather than actually solving any puzzles.

The art style is very attractive but gets ruined by an item picked up later in the game which puts a messy overlay over this.

This game could really have benefitted with additional content, more purpose made interesting puzzles, a well thought out driving story rather than a balled up handful of clichés. The concept provides a basis for a useful way to introduce people to the concepts of programming which they managed well to a certain point after which it feels they lost focus, gave up and stamped it as finished.

The concept is great hopefully future games will learn from this game and improve upon it and create something fun and educational.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.9 hrs on record
Posted: November 10
It's cute, it's intuitive, it's fun to play.

Hack n' Slash is a Legend of Zelda-like game where gender roles are reversed ala Peter Pan style. You are Alice (by default or whatever name you want to give her). You begin the game in Act 2 finding yourself in a cage in a cave. (You'll know more about Act 1 later in the game.) You attempt to use your sword to break open the door of the cage, but your sword breaks. Now you can access the game's code on objects you attack with the broken sword. It's like tweaking game .ini or .xml configuration files in real-time. Want to unlock that door? Set it's DoorLocked flag to 0.

But it's not as simple as just 'cheating' your way through the game like with the opening act in the cage. There are some pretty tricky puzzles to solve where hacking certain objects or even global values is needed to solve some of them.

You'll encounter unique gear such as the Wizard Hat that allows you to see the game's raw pathing map layout, or artifacts that allow you to change the day/night cycle time and time ellapse speed. There are also some familiar items such as the classic blue boomerang. This boomerang though, allows you to attack, thus hack, yourself.

The music is charming and the visuals are genuinely unique. Everything is hand drawn 2D, and the music has a classic midi feel to it.

The game is kind of short though, so I won't tell you too much more. I hope this review helps you in making your descision on purchasing or not this game.
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
1.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 21
I really had high hopes for this game, the concept is really interesting. Unfortunately this is another case of a neat concept with poor excecution. You solve problems by "modifying the game", but what "modifying the game" means is just changing object variables (i.e. modify a creature's health/alignment/damage, change the number of times you can move a block, volume of a sound, etc.). You don't actually write functions to run and make things happen in the game, or anything exciting like that. I could have been willing to look past this, however; after all, Brutal Legend, another Double Fine game, also suffers from somewhat lackluster (although i personally found it enjoyable) gameplay, but more than makes up for it with a fantastic environment, enjoyable characters, and excellent aesthetic. Hack 'n' Slash, sadly, fails on this front as well. The best way I could come up with to describe the writing is DESPERATELY trying to be clever but failing miserably. Every character is this way to the point of being irritating. The world itself isn't anything out of the ordinary either; generic "retro-styled" backgrounds and levels coupled with a boring soundtrack are largely ignorable.

In summary: excellent concept, mediocre excecution, TERRIBLE writing, bland aesthetic.

EDIT: I've been told that later in the game you DO actually modify the game code and write lines yourself, but these sections are very poorly executed and are more confusing and frustrating than original and enjoyable. So no, it doesn't get better.
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10 of 19 people (53%) found this review helpful
22.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 28
Look, I would love to recomend this game, I would. There's so many great ideas. Hacking the code of the game could make for something magical, But it turns into a lengthy challenging puzzle grind at the end for anyone who doesn't know any programming. I can't say you're going to like more than the first 1-2 hours.
More in depth review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXc4jP_0dBI
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1 of 3 people (33%) found this review helpful
0.7 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
Lots of fun for anyone with a little interest in coding, will need to play more to finish though.
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0 of 1 people (0%) found this review helpful
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
good game. you should get it
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0 of 1 people (0%) found this review helpful
6.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 2
So after 4 hours (+ a few extra minutes for numerous game restarts (which I'll get to later)), I can say that I enjoyed this experiment. I received the game for free, so I really couldn't complain.

It starts off innocently enough and if anyone has played with game creators, you'll soon see what I mean. Editing rocks or doors to change their properties...etc. Simple enough stuff and when you've got the hang of it, no problem.

The only problem I have is about midway through the game when the real "programming" kicks in. The learning curve becomes a cliff. The tutorials at using this new functionality (editing the base code on which the game is built) are easy compared to what you eventually need to do with it (although it's normally just editing a few variables...but finding them is the difficult part and as such led me to crashing the game numerous times, beyond the in game error handling)

I would recommend, especially if you picked it up for free. It's a fantastic idea that I'd like to see developed further and maybe easy people into the lua a bit more before drowning them in the pages of code.
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0 of 2 people (0%) found this review helpful
0.8 hrs on record
Posted: November 12
From the little I played, it wasn't what I expected. Much less hack and slash and much more boring puzzle solving. The idea is really cool, editing an enemies stats to be advtnageous. The game surrounding that system is so boring. I was imagining more like an actual hack and slash, fighting to get my sword into the guy to drastically lower his HP stat or slow him down, or change him to friendly instead of...waiting for a turtle to flip over to change its walk cycle.

I expected puzzler + hack and slash, not a poorly done, relies-on-one-gimic Zelda clone.
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0 of 2 people (0%) found this review helpful
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 12
This is the worst game I've ever played. Nothing in here is fun. It's "light hearted tongue in cheek" attitude masks the lack of stakes in the story or gameplay. I have no motivation to do anything. At least in a real hack and slash game you have to feel of hitting stuff and the fun of dosging attacks. There's no combat here. It's all some clunky puzzle thing using the same stupid simple mechanics.

It's so dumb.
I hate it.
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0 of 2 people (0%) found this review helpful
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
VERY hard but, oddly, also cutesy fun :)
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0 of 2 people (0%) found this review helpful
4.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 1
Too buggy as of today. Recommended for the original gameplay they offer, but not recommended to play until all the critical issued are resolved
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6 of 20 people (30%) found this review helpful
2.9 hrs on record
Posted: October 28
A cool education tool for teaching autistic children the principals of coding.
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7 of 23 people (30%) found this review helpful
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 27
If you like computer games that use computer input devices like mice, then don't buy this. Clunky on keyboard. Stay away unless you have a controller. I wish I had one and could give this a thorough review.
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0 of 8 people (0%) found this review helpful
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 4
Kinda interesting I guess for a 5 year old. pretty blah
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4 of 20 people (20%) found this review helpful
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: October 28
♥♥♥♥ty confusing start made me quit got it free tho so hat should i have expected
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