You are the Dragon Commander. Your mission it is to reunite a broken empire and become the new emperor. Success depends entirely on your ability to efficiently rule your empire, build invincible armies and lead them to victory.
User reviews: Mostly Positive (1,059 reviews) - 78% of the 1,059 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Aug 6, 2013

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Recommended By Curators

"A game that maybe tries to do too much and succeeds at most of it. Genre-bending with funny and interesting writing and dilemmas. Dodgy RTS sections."
Read the full review here.


"Colourful, fun and memorable, its elements mesh surprisingly well." - 85% - PC Gamer

"Delightful merger of role-playing, strategy, and action...Dragon Commander is a gem." - 8/10 - Gamespot

"Divinity: Dragon Commander came out of nowhere to become one of my favorite games of the year. Swift, brutal dragon combat paired with large RTS battles works way better than I ever expected it to." - 8/10 - Venturebeat

"Proper strategy, like mama used to make... its loveable nature and repertoire of charming tricks absolutely wins the day." - Rock Paper Shotgun

"Dragon Commander manages to combine all of its different gameplay elements and delivers one cohesive experience that's highly worth playing" - 4/5 - Gamesradar

"Larian has created a unique, engrossing combination of strategy, political choice and rapid battlefield command." - 8/10 - Incgamers

About This Game

You are the Dragon Commander. Your mission it is to reunite a broken empire and become the new emperor. Success depends entirely on your ability to efficiently rule your empire, build invincible armies and lead them to victory. Your secret weapons: your tactical insights, your leadership skills and your ability to turn yourself into a dragon.
Dragon Commander is not just any strategy game - it seamlessly blends real-time strategy gameplay with turn-based campaigning, role-playing an ascending emperor and controlling a formidable dragon.

Key Features

  • Real time strategy: Command your sea, land and air forces in real-time. Combined operations and knowing where and when to hit are crucial elements of any victory.
  • Dragon Combat: During real time strategy mode, you can turn into a dragon to support your troops in combat and obliterate the enemy using your formidable dragon powers.
  • Turn based campaign: Direct your conquest on the turn-based world map; plan several moves ahead, build formidable armies and invest in the right technology or magic upgrades.
  • Rule your empire: You are the emperor and you make the decisions! But beware, political balance is easily upset. Each game is different and you'll find that a Dragon Commander needs to make really tough decisions. Feel the effects of your decisions on the battlefield as the war progresses.
  • Single-player, multiplayer and co-op modes: Play the single player story-driven campaign or test your mettle against other Dragon Knights, online or local via LAN. Start your own multiplayer campaign with or against a friend. Or duke it out on a skirmish map.

System Requirements

    • OS:Windows XP SP3
    • Processor:Intel Core2 Duo E6600 or equivalent
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA® GeForce® 8800 GT (512 MB) or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 4850
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:15 GB HD space
    • Sound:DirectX9c compliant
    • Other Requirements:Broadband Internet connection
    • OS:Windows 7 SP1
    • Processor:Intel i5 2400
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 550 ti 1GB ram or or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 6XXX
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:30 GB HD space
    • Sound:DirectX9c compliant, 5.1 surround sound
    • Other Requirements:Broadband Internet connection
Helpful customer reviews
53 of 56 people (95%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
27.9 hrs on record
Posted: August 31
Divinity: Dragon Commander is a pretty great mix of real-time straetgy, turn-based strategy, political simulation and action-packed third-person dragon fighting ^^

You are playing as dragon commander and your task is to defeat your evil brothers and sisters and conquer Rivellon.

"Raven", your flagship, is your base of command from where you can access different rooms to plan your next steps.
On said ship there are also ambassadors from different species (like elves, dwarfs, reptilians and the undead) and they will ask you every now and then to do a political decision, which also has a little impact on reputation, earned gold etc.

Then, after you are done with talking to everyone and you want to start conquering, there is the world map, divided into several "countries" (ever played the board game "Risk"? Then you know how it plays). Each of these "countries" can be conquered with your units and you can buy and build one of several buildings on it. Some give you more gold, some will grant you cards, which you can use to get extra units or other advantages in the combat.

Once you bought your units, placed them, used your cards and you want to attack another country, then you will jump into real-time strategy part.
The strategy part is rather simple. You have several fixed spots on the map, where you can build buildings on. First, you have to get your units there and wait a bit for them to capture them, only then you can build there.
Over time, you gain points (i think they are called citizens) which you need in order to build your attack units and buildings.

The one big diffenrece and fun thing here is, once you collected enough citizens, you can transform into a dragon, fly around in third person and attack the enemy, buff your units or debuff the enemy units.
You are pretty powerful and can turn a seemingly lost battle into a victory, but you are not invincible.

On your flagship you can buy new buffs, debuffs for your dragon, new units and upgrades for your units.

It's a very well done mix, although it plays very simplistic and doesn't have the depth of other RTS games.
The maps itself are also rather small and will repeat quite often.

The characters are pretty well done, and also the political debates and decisions are quite fun. Most of the time they are split in half, wether they like a decision or not, so you can't please everyone always. But the impact of the decision isn't that big.
Speaking of the political debates, the humor is quite good as well, the dialogues are fun and i found myself to have more interest in these, than in the rest of the game ^^
Pretty early on, you are also given the choice to marry a woman from one of the species. The dialogues with them afterwards and the choices you make there are also pretty great and hilarious.

The game itself is a great mix of different genres, which plays pretty good, although being rather simplistic, but still fun enough to entertain a lot, especially when you are soaring through the air as powerful dragon, crushing all those puny enemies ^^

Can definitely recommend this to everyone even slightly interested in real-time strategy games. A very refreshing and unique game in my opinion, don't miss out.
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32 of 33 people (97%) found this review helpful
35.1 hrs on record
Posted: October 29
The single-player mode in Divinity: Dragon Commander sets up a decent plot about a being who can transform into a dragon who is disputing with its other, equally crazy siblings. The story portrayed through the cutscenes is certainly well told, but serves as more or less a justification to go from one map to the next.

Though the tutorials don't do much to explain this, Divinity: Dragon Commander is a mix of boardgame-style territory control (a la Risk) and real-time strategy (RTS) battles. The majority of a "match" will have players moving pieces around a game board in an attempt to control and dominate as much of the map as possible. The biggest problem is that the tutorial doesn't even attempt to explain any of this.

After watching the multitude of tutorial videos, it's easy to assume that the game is only an RTS game, as it doesn't touch on any of the mechanics associated with the boardgame portions of a match. When first confronted with the board, some tooltips are displayed to help explain things, but they are incredibly insufficient. The tutorials for the RTS elements are also insufficient, as is the case with just about every non-interactive tutorial. There is a "Training Ground" that allows players to screw around as they please, but it does little in the way of actively teaching anything.

The boardgame portions of the game take place in turns and require a "big picture" type of thinking in order to play effectively. Two types of resources are up for grabs: gold and resource points. Occupying various areas on the map will add to the amount of resources gained per turn, the exact amount being displayed on the territory itself. When a battle occurs, the player has the option to choose a specific general, each with their own playstyle, to auto-simulate the battle and play the odds, or they can control the Dragon Commander and head into battle themselves.

The battles play out like many other real-time strategy games, but with one twist: the player can take control of a jetpack dragon and partake in the battle themselves. Doing so is somewhat limited; there are a couple of minutes in the beginning of the match in which the dragon cannot be spawned (it takes resources, which you don’t yet have, to spawn the dragon), and there is a brief period after death in which the dragon cannot be spawned. The dragon has specific abilities at its disposal as well, each with its own separate cooldown. There are also three different dragons to choose from, each with their own abilities and playstyle.

Playing as a dragon is like playing a third-person shooter; it's very action-oriented. When doing so, however, it is important not to forget about the troops on the ground. Battles will be fought in tandem, as the player commands the dragon in the sky while their troops march beneath them into battle. There are limited army commands while in dragon mode, so it is possible to command an army while simultaneously breathing fire on enemy scum. Mastering these army commands is a hugely effective way to get a leg up on an opponent, since it's incredibly easy to forget about a ground army while soaring through the air and toasting fools.

As for the non-dragon RTS mechanics, battles consist of vying for resources called Recruits. Recruits are gained over time as long as the player has Recruitment Centers built on top of certain locations around the map. These locations are neutral in the beginning of the map, and need to be captured by having at least one unit nearby. The beginning of the match is incredibly important as players have limited units and must try to capture and hold as many build locations as possible, both for Recruitment Centers and unit-producing buildings.

The RTS controls do feel a bit clunky when compared to the standards of the genre. Intermediate tactics like control groups can be utilized, but most units move way too slowly to micromanage effectively. In addition, the camera is constantly shifting position when going back and forth between RTS and dragon mode and it can be quite frustrating to constantly have to re-adjust the camera.

The true highlight of the single-player campaign is what happens in between turns, aboard a ship called the Raven. This is where the diplomatic elements come into play, as a group of five diplomats will constantly bug the player with proposals and recommendations as to how to run a country. Each diplomat represents a specific race: Undead, Elves, Dwarves, Lizards, or Imps. Making certain decisions will alter how each race feels about the player, so balancing the favor of each race becomes quite the juggling act.

The Raven is also where players will spend their research points. These points, accrued each turn, can be spent on new units and unit abilities or on new dragon abilities. Deciding where to spend research points is no easy feat, as doing so can drastically alter a playstyle. One player might want to spend heavily on their dragon, making each player-controlled battle that much easier, while someone else might want to focus on their army and let their AI generals auto-simulate the battles.

It is, of course, also possible to take the battles online against honest-to-goodness humans. The Raven doesn't make an appearance in any multiplayer mode, since chances are people would spend forever in between turns, but its absence is made up by the presence of dragon-on-dragon battles. There are two game modes: Campaign and Skirmish, the latter of which is a single battle in the RTS-style of gameplay, without the boardgame map. The former is just like single-player but without the Raven.

The dragon battles are the clear highlight of multiplayer. Battles are no longer instantly won once the player decides to command their dragon, because the enemy player can do the same thing and fight back. The strategy shifts dramatically when a player knows that a dragon can emerge at just about any moment. Anti-air units are way more valuable as most of them, when grouped up, can take out a dragon pretty quickly. The dogfights, er, dragonfights, that can happen in the air are intense and are a true test of a player's focus, as it's even easier to forget about a ground army when using skills and dodging.

Each area and NPC looks unique and beautiful, both in terms of technical graphics power and character design. A pretty big issue for some players, though, is the lack of a colorblind mode, as the default colors of the single-player campaign are red and green. This issue persists on both the overworld map as well as mid-battle. During the battle, enemy units are labeled when far away from the camera with a red icon, but the icon goes away as they get closer for some strange reason, reverting back to the reliance on color differentiation.

The voice work of Divinity: Dragon Commander deserves special mention. With so many different characters aboard the Raven, the voice acting was immediately a cause for concern for me. Luckily, each character performs well and it is a joy to talk to each and every one. Sure, no one character's voice actor stands out as particularly amazing, but the sheer virtue of not having a single character grate on the nerves is not to be understated.

Divinity: Dragon Commander is a prime example of a game being bigger than the sum of its parts. The RTS elements are a bit rough, but at least it's possible to control a dragon with a freaking jetpack to blow stuff up, while the boardgame-esque territory map requires players to think of the big picture. Talking to the colorful cast of NPCs aboard the Raven in between turns in single-player was easily one of my favorite non-dragon parts of the game and really highlights the writing and wit that the Divinity series has come to be known for. The tutorial needs a lot of work and the game isn't very friendly to colorblind players, but Divinity: Dragon Commander will certainly unleash the dragon strategist in all of us.
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22 of 23 people (96%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
90.8 hrs on record
Posted: November 8
Divinity: Dragon Commander is partly an opportunity wasted. On one side is a rich strategic elements to consider, in an interesting setting, and chock full of original ideas. On the other hand though his simplistic gameplay during battles, poor game balancing in the individual, and the inability of developers to deepen certain inspired as the mechanical use of the cards or the Dragon in battle, lower the overall quality of the game to "just as good". Although a bit disappointed, we cannot not make compliments to Larian for originality, and hope they can exploit their talents equally distinctive projects in the future. The basics are there, and they look very solid.
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23 of 28 people (82%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
33.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 6
Before this game I'd never played any of the other games in the franchise. I purchased this game simply for my love of RTS strategy and the insane(ly good) concept of dragon combat.

So what does this game do right?

There is an interesting research system integrated into the game, research is conducted through research points that you pick up per turn depending on the territories controlled and the buildings on those territories.

The politics system is actually a lot of fun (though frustrating at times) and a large part of the game. Political decisions are made throughout the game knowingly or not. For example if you build far many buildings in your controlled territories you can lose reputation with the elves (which are predictably nature orientated). Every turn or so you vote on some initiatives brought up by certain representatives and can lose or gain reputation points. At first you might think, so what? However, since each faction inhabits certain territories the amount of troops can build or the resources you gain per territory are highly dependent on how much that faction likes you.

Additionally, also must manage your responses to your friendly generals and the princess you choose to “woo” as well. Dialogue options between these characters lead to some pretty significant outcomes during the game so it is wise to pay attention to the characters and faction personalities.

Oh and by the way I can't really stress enough that each voiced character you come across has a unique personality that will develop over time with their own specific needs and wants.

Dragon combat, how how I love you. During the normal RTS strategy portions you can become a dragon and blaze around the combat area using specific abilities and really punishing enemies that come against you.

So what didn’t I like about this game?

Combat can feel really messy without there being much strategy that just having "more" than the other opponent. Sure there are a ok sized amount of abilities for each class and each class has a counter class (or building) but it really feels under utilized.

Combat on higher difficultly levels can be extremely punishing. Each territory can only draft so many troops before it is tapped out, this encourages you to expand into fresh territories. However if the enemy decides to attack a tapped out territory that doesn't have a large amount of troops stationed on it, there won't be much of a way to fight back.

What kind of irked me as well is that no matter how many troops I had at the end of each act it seems that there is a standard set amount placed around the map when starting a new chapter. This kind of took away from my sense of accomplishment when taking down an enemy and managing my armies.

Finally, I felt the game drags a bit on the final act not really giving you much to do besides to slug it out with the final enemies until the end. For me, this was kind of a unsatisfying conclusion and would have liked to see even more personally engaging missions involving your generals, allies, or princess.
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14 of 15 people (93%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
26.3 hrs on record
Posted: September 18
+ Bold and somewhat successful mixture of action and strategies
+ Well written dialogue and characters
+ Voice acting
+ Soundtrack

- The main plot is dull and forgettable
- The politcal affairs aren't as challenging as they might firstly seem
- Strategy elements are too simple and crude
- Some unbalance between units

Owning every Larian develeoped game in steam I guess I can present myself a some sort of fan. I praise Divinity II: Dragon Knight Saga and Original Sin is IMO one of the best co-op titles in steam. Even so, Dragon Commander is difficult to like as it is also difficult to hate. It mixes so many different elements and genres together (more or less successfully) and was produced so harriedly that devs must have had some compromises.

Majorly gameplay is quite much adapted from 'Total war' series combaining real-time - and turn-based strategy.The game puts player into the boots of Dragon Commander, a powerful dragonbreed, and on each turn on a world map player builds units and constructions and moves his armies to invade new areas. When player and enemy have units at the same area in the end of the turn the blood will spill. In these conflicts player deals with the enemy in real-time combat and gameplay reminds the popular rts -series. Optionally, commander can let the AI sort out the battle by paying a reward one of the generals who increase the precent of success or let the army in the location fight without support.

Most of my playtime I spent on battlefields personally commanding troops and the rts gameplay has its pros and cons.

Starting with the pros. There is various available land -, sea - and air units and each of them have certain special abilities. The resources are collected automatically by constructing settlements on predefined places, that add some hecticism forcing player to act quickly. The genuine feature is ability to assist your troops not just by commanding but to turning a dragon when gameplay transforms into third-person-shooter game. There is also various talents to choose from: some of them are attribute increasing buffs for your units but there is also some heavy weaponry which can blast dozens of enemies at once.

And then to the cons. The biggest thing is the lack of maps, which begin inescapably to repeat themself before finishing the game. Secondly, battles are easy to win with most simple strategies and here is a typical scenario: Build units-take a defensive position if outnumbered-destroy enemy assault-build more units-take control of the nearest resource buildings-hire more units-take a defensive position-destroy the enemy assault-take all your units and march into their capital.
I never felt couraged to use more sophisticated tactic because I never needed one. I didn't have any use for transport ships for an example.

Among these conquests and war planning there is quite much to do and to decide in a political court also. The population of Rivellon's world is inhabited with 5 different species: Dwarves, Elfs, Imps, Lizards and Undead. As you might guess the values and preferences of these folk differ a lot from each other and it is impossible to please them all. The race which you are bowing may grant populations support on battles fought on their lands whereas the breed you are abandoning may degrace their support. Depending on case, the secondary effect of choice is how much money you make or how much units you can hire on each turn.

Amusing thing is that you'll also earn a liberty to choose a wife between 4 exotic races - I chose undead Ophelia. Ehmm, I don't consider myself a necrophilic person - I did it for the empire. (lol)

All these events and scandals happening outside of the battles are fun to follow. Some politcal crisis are brilliant improvising our own modern cases and the some decisions have impact how your generals relate to you as war goes by.

However, dealing with all this politc jumbo is not as hard as I first imagined. I always had at least the 50% support of each race and all I needed to do was to be victoriuos in battlefields and to take a side of a majority in cases. The nightmares of crisises and political challenges faded away just too easily that partly ruined the good idea.

All in all Dragon Commander deserves good rating. Dragon Commander is a sum of many compromises and might lose a part of its potential after promising start but on the other hand it has some wonderful moments. Engaging as a dragon for your troops' support in battles was something that you don't see everyday and it was always fun to watch and hear how others were reacting when undead wanted to legalize Necromatism for an example. On its full price I can't recommend it, but on sale a fan of light strategy should give it a try.
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