You can't save the whole world. It's going to be eaten by a mythological demon with the head of a fish. But as a puppet that absorbs all it touches, you can try to rescue as much of Earth's greatness as you can before the end arrives. In the beginning, you roam the Earth, capable of absorbing only the tiniest of objects.
User reviews:
Recent:
Positive (11 reviews) - 90% of the 11 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Mostly Positive (452 reviews) - 73% of the 452 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Jan 25, 2008

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About This Game

You can't save the whole world. It's going to be eaten by a mythological demon with the head of a fish. But as a puppet that absorbs all it touches, you can try to rescue as much of Earth's greatness as you can before the end arrives.

In the beginning, you roam the Earth, capable of absorbing only the tiniest of objects. A glass marble you collect becomes your head, and a pair of jellybeans becomes your hands. Small creatures overwhelm you, with rats kicking you around and golden retrievers threatening to stomp you to pieces. But with every object you collect, your puppet self grows larger. Eventually, you'll become a towering behemoth with fire engines for arms and the ability to absorb entire buildings.

The Wonderful End of the World takes you through 12 unique locations, with over a thousand treasures to gather before the end comes. Steal some sweets from the candy store, where gummi fish swim in a blueberry river; visit a surrealist library to find that the words have literally leapt out of their books; and explore the Megalopolis, where you'll watch a lively end-of-the-world parade and then gobble it up before making your way to grab the tallest skyscraper ever built.

  • 10 achievements for exploring and unlocking secret areas of the game
  • 12 unique locations to explore
  • 3 gameplay modes: Timed, Timeless, and Exploration
  • 16 bouncy music tracks keep the action rocking. Or bopping.

System Requirements

    • OS: Windows 2000 / XP / Vista
    • Processor: 1.5GHz
    • Memory: 1GB
    • Graphics: DX9 compatible 3D card
    • DirectX Version: 9.0c
    • Sound: DX9 compatible sound card
    • Hard Drive: 220MB
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Positive (11 reviews)
Overall:
Mostly Positive (452 reviews)
Recently Posted
Seawater
( 3.8 hrs on record )
Posted: April 28
I see people complaining about this, but it's not like the Katamari games don't have any problems either.

It's not a perfect game and it's not as lovingly bizarre as Katamari, but The Wonderful End of the World is still a lot of fun and enjoyably strange.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
[NWA] Cousin 5K3373R
( 2.1 hrs on record )
Posted: March 29
Just finished the game and A+'d all of the levels. It's really nice to have a game like this and break away from the normal triple-A pattern of games. The soundtrack is amazing, and the visuals are hilarious. If you want to break away and have a little something that's fun to play on the side, this game is definitely worth it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Bassem
( 1.5 hrs on record )
Posted: March 27
Small-scale Katamari fun

In this casual game, you play as an aetherial homunculus that absorbs any smaller objects on touch, and keeps growing with every object absorbed.

The idea is to map out the best path to follow that lets you absorb the highest number of objects in a steady increasing size to get the highest grade within the time limit.

The game's levels are mostly set in urban environments (indoors and outdoors) with also a few abstract levels such as a Pac-Man one and one made of letters and words.

You unlock a level by getting a passing grade on an adjacent level.
There's also a mode without time limit that you unlock with passing grades.

I would say it takes a couple of hours to pass all the levels. But you can keep playing indefinitely with the timeless modes, trying to beat your own high score.

A quick list of technical annoyances:
  • No widescreen support
  • Controller play is wonky. Go for keyboard & mouse.
  • Collision can be sticky, and you can get stuck in some places. You might get sent flying off if you get squeezed somewhere, or slowed to a crawl.
  • The poor collision also prevents you from picking up objects sometimes, so you walk back and forth over them like passing a vacuum cleaner over a stubborn speck stuck to the carpet.

Overall though it's a fun little game that will entertain you for a couple of days. And you won't really find any other Katamari-likes on PC, so this one will do.

As usual with Dejobaan's games, the music is a lot of fun and the game is full of little quirks.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
j_blox
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: March 13
This game is really addicting! I haven't spent a lot of time in it yet, due to time constraints, but I will come back and probably replay levels too. It's easy to get started, hard to put down. I just want to save everything!

But you are a little small puppet type thing that grows bigger with the more things that are absorbed, resulting in getting bigger. There are little things in the environment that will knock you back, my favorite being the somewhat big, but cute spider. There are multiple levels, each with its own sort of theme and items that you can play through. It also has pretty good music that fits with the game itself. Overall I would give it 8/10, with just a few inconsitencies in the game mechanics.

I have done a let's play (although not a good one) showing my first time playing if you are unsure wether to get it or not.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyvGXTlTliQ&index=3&list=PLKrT-oZe8wuc65PZPH2dC1624dow3SnMP

But I would recommed this game, especially for the price :)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
LimEJET
( 2.1 hrs on record )
Pre-Release Review
Posted: February 27
It's Katamari Damacy with bad hit detection and no textures.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Renim
( 4.9 hrs on record )
Posted: February 25
super short. a game that would benefit from custom level support

i'ts not a bad game, though
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Dan
( 8.1 hrs on record )
Posted: February 11
9/10 one of the most fun & oddly satisfying games I've played.

Probably would have even given a 10/10 for:
1. Restart button
2. Option to toggle main music
3. More info at level select (grade reqs, my best time, score)
4. Viewable statistics (total objects grabbed etc.)
5. See # objects remaining in the zone

(I neither played nor heard of Katamari before reading other reviews.)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
ownosourus
( 16.3 hrs on record )
Posted: January 18
In an industry that's dominated by major corporations and never-ending strings of blockbuster sequels, it's great to run into a fun, imaginative game from a smaller company. The Wonderful End of the World from Dejobaan Games, certainly fits this description. It looks good, plays well, and has a great soundtrack. And it gives you the chance to play a walking collection of houses. Or buses. Or any other object that you can scoop up and make a part of your ever-growing body.

The premise is a simple one, and one that console gamers that have played Katamari Damacy will be familiar with. The world is about to end, and it's up to the player to grab and save as much stuff as possible before it's all lost. That's it. There is no plot that progresses from one level to the next. Instead, each level is a wildly different, wildly decorated environment that presents lots and lots of collectible stuff ranging from the appropriate to the absurd. A backyard area has lawn chairs and shrubs and a lawn mower - all stuff you might find in an average back yard. The neighbor's yard, however, features a group of what look to be orangutans and chimpanzees seated at dining room tables. The centerpiece of the same yard involves Lassie presiding in a Stonehenge made of old cars. Other levels are just as fun and take their inspiration from things like Candyland, a coffee house, and your local mall. There's even a great level that's based on classic arcade games, including Pong, Centipede, and Tron, just to name a few.

A big chunk of the Wonderful fun lies in exploring all those locations, but the challenge comes from the attempt to accumulate all that stuff as quickly as possible and the player's size is the key. When a level starts, you're just a little bugger, able to grab things like coffee cups and books. Walk over any of these and they become part of the conglomeration of clutter that is your body: a walking pile of trees, lamp posts, baseball bats and whatever else you happened to collect. And as all this stuff sticks to you, you gain bulk and the ability to gather larger and larger objects, until skyscrapers and ships are sucked into your gravitational field.

This 'junk puppet' is one of the game's major technical achievements. The heap of objects appears to have arms and legs made up of recently-collected stuff. And as you grow, the game does a nice job of keeping the camera in scale with you. At first it's nearly at ground-level as you collect flowers and butterflies, and it grows out to a bird's-eye-view as you tower over whole neighborhoods. Occasionally, though, it's possible to get stuck in an area because you grew just enough to make it tough to exit but not enough to absorb the object blocking your way.

Part of the challenge is learning what you can and can't absorb at any given time. Since you've got to rack up as many collections as possible in a set time, you can't afford to waste precious seconds bouncing off objects that aren't your size yet. You've got to keep moving and keep collecting so that you grow large enough to start grabbing people, cars, buses, and rack up a score that counts in the billions.

While Wonderful End of the World probably falls into what's often called the 'casual game' category, that doesn't mean that it isn't challenging. It gives you eleven different main levels to run, and at the end of each, it hands out letter grades, all the way up to A+. If you get at least an A on every level the game unlocks a bonus level. This is easier said than done - after plenty of trying, I'm still working to earn that twelfth level. Although the main missions will take you only a few hours to clear if you're persistent, there's replay value in the game modes unlocked once all eleven standard levels are cleared. For one, you get a reverse-timed mode where the clock counts up and scores you on how long it takes you to clear all the items from a level. And you also get a free exploration mode that allows you to go through the whole level and see all there is to see without the pressure of a clock or score.

If there's a down side to Wonderful End of the World, it's the fact that the gameplay stays essentially the same from one level to the next. Once you've figured out how to maneuver, the challenge lies in finding the best path through a level, the one where you can keep grabbing and growing without wasting any time. This makes each level a challenge in its own right, but it means that you're basically doing the same thing throughout. Still, it's always a pleasure to finally grow to Godzilla size at the end of a level and start rolling up the objects by the dozen.

On the tech side of things, The Wonderful End of the World is a very stable game. The only issue I had was a little bit of camera craziness now and again. As I negotiated some tight corners, my vision might get blocked for a few seconds, but nothing bad enough to keep me from getting where I was going.

The Wonderful End of the World has everything going for it. It's a fun game with a distinctive look and a fun soundtrack. It's a bit short, but the levels are replayable as you try to unlock the bonus level or try for perfect A+ grades across the board. And developer Dejobaan is no newcomer to the games biz - their gameography stretches back to 1999 with a couple of titles released almost every year. Browse their catalog, and you'll find one beautiful game after another, each with a hook that'll have you downloading the demo to see what it's all about. With The Wonderful End of the World as an example of what Dejobaan Games can do, I'm looking forward to playing other games made by them.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Asteranx
( 1.9 hrs on record )
Posted: January 18
This is a poor Katamari Damacy clone, using the word clone in the loosest possible sense. I loved the game it's based on, which is why I gave this a shot. Unfortunately it's pretty much rubbish. Playable, but still rubbish.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
C@$h-M0ney-[1138]
( 8.8 hrs on record )
Posted: January 10
Decent little clone of the Katamari Damacy games just on steam, I wish there were more levels or other games similar to this on Steam/Pc. The game is great it's just to short but you should bu it anyway!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
SpoopyDoops
( 1.3 hrs on record )
Posted: January 10
Like a slightly worse Katamari Damacy.

---Pros: Sucking up objects is super fun and satisfying, three modes for each level (including a notime limit mode), lots of unique sets, a nice array of music with variety and generally pretty good.

---Cons: Gamepad support is implemented badly (using a steam controller fixes it), no graphical objects, noticeably framerate drops, and a camera that is just a little too touchy, resulting in jerky movement.

Overall, the only real problems I have with this game are the technical ones, but just sucking up everything in an enviornment is really fun and enjoyable. It's decent and if you think from the trailer that it looks fun, you should get it on sale.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
dafka a.k.a. etc.
( 1.0 hrs on record )
Pre-Release Review
Posted: January 4
meh...
Helpful? Yes No Funny
GinKadia
( 6.9 hrs on record )
Posted: January 4
If you loved Katamari Damacy, then you'll enjoy this little game.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Janeiac
( 8.2 hrs on record )
Posted: January 3
I really miss playing We <3 Katamari on PS2 and I heard this would fill my needs.
I'd say it certainly did that, if only for a while. It's a shame it wasn't longer but it was very enjoyable while it lasted.
Roll up all the things to get as big as possible and save the world.
I'd say one to get in a sale but well worth a look if you need a fix of Katamari goodness.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Onii-chan
( 2.2 hrs on record )
Posted: December 27, 2015
It's like Katamari but not as good. Worth it for cheap. Good little waste of time.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
über•E
( 0.1 hrs on record )
Posted: December 23, 2015
Why did I buy this again? I can't remember.

If you have 10 dollars you're better off buying a bunch of trading cards.

2/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
PrettyPrincessKitty FS
( 2.0 hrs on record )
Posted: December 21, 2015
It's sort of a Katamari Damacy thing. You eat smaller things and then become bigger to eat bigger things and then eat bigger things, continue until you eat the entire level.

The levels are fairly varied and keep it fresh, even if they're not very long (a couple of hours, probably, for everything). It's good fun though.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
BoulderPaperShotgun
( 1.9 hrs on record )
Posted: December 20, 2015
The Wonderful End of the World is hard,but FUN! I like how it's similar to Katamari Damacy. The graphics are good. The gameplay is good. Although the Word Forge music is just "noise". This is a great game. Like AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA! good.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
pfbrettell
( 2.8 hrs on record )
Posted: December 10, 2015
Poorly made Katamari rip-off
Helpful? Yes No Funny
The cat who walks
( 0.1 hrs on record )
Posted: December 8, 2015
After reading the writeups for this game I had a lot of hopes for it. A simple back-story, vaguely familiar gameplay, and a quirky nature that should have made it a fun game.

Unfortunately, I was quite a fan of Katamari Damacy back in the day... and a few levels into the game I found myself just pining for the original. The movement in this game feels twitchy in comparison (Your pickup radius doesn't increase in size, for example) and doesn't have the same ambience as Katamari.

Overall, I think this game could be a great and fun introduction to a style of game that was unique but is unavailable on PC, but I can't recommend it to existing fans of the genre.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.8 hrs on record
Posted: April 28
I see people complaining about this, but it's not like the Katamari games don't have any problems either.

It's not a perfect game and it's not as lovingly bizarre as Katamari, but The Wonderful End of the World is still a lot of fun and enjoyably strange.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 90 days
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
1.5 hrs on record
Posted: March 27
Small-scale Katamari fun

In this casual game, you play as an aetherial homunculus that absorbs any smaller objects on touch, and keeps growing with every object absorbed.

The idea is to map out the best path to follow that lets you absorb the highest number of objects in a steady increasing size to get the highest grade within the time limit.

The game's levels are mostly set in urban environments (indoors and outdoors) with also a few abstract levels such as a Pac-Man one and one made of letters and words.

You unlock a level by getting a passing grade on an adjacent level.
There's also a mode without time limit that you unlock with passing grades.

I would say it takes a couple of hours to pass all the levels. But you can keep playing indefinitely with the timeless modes, trying to beat your own high score.

A quick list of technical annoyances:
  • No widescreen support
  • Controller play is wonky. Go for keyboard & mouse.
  • Collision can be sticky, and you can get stuck in some places. You might get sent flying off if you get squeezed somewhere, or slowed to a crawl.
  • The poor collision also prevents you from picking up objects sometimes, so you walk back and forth over them like passing a vacuum cleaner over a stubborn speck stuck to the carpet.

Overall though it's a fun little game that will entertain you for a couple of days. And you won't really find any other Katamari-likes on PC, so this one will do.

As usual with Dejobaan's games, the music is a lot of fun and the game is full of little quirks.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 180 days
22 of 25 people (88%) found this review helpful
Recommended
16.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 18
In an industry that's dominated by major corporations and never-ending strings of blockbuster sequels, it's great to run into a fun, imaginative game from a smaller company. The Wonderful End of the World from Dejobaan Games, certainly fits this description. It looks good, plays well, and has a great soundtrack. And it gives you the chance to play a walking collection of houses. Or buses. Or any other object that you can scoop up and make a part of your ever-growing body.

The premise is a simple one, and one that console gamers that have played Katamari Damacy will be familiar with. The world is about to end, and it's up to the player to grab and save as much stuff as possible before it's all lost. That's it. There is no plot that progresses from one level to the next. Instead, each level is a wildly different, wildly decorated environment that presents lots and lots of collectible stuff ranging from the appropriate to the absurd. A backyard area has lawn chairs and shrubs and a lawn mower - all stuff you might find in an average back yard. The neighbor's yard, however, features a group of what look to be orangutans and chimpanzees seated at dining room tables. The centerpiece of the same yard involves Lassie presiding in a Stonehenge made of old cars. Other levels are just as fun and take their inspiration from things like Candyland, a coffee house, and your local mall. There's even a great level that's based on classic arcade games, including Pong, Centipede, and Tron, just to name a few.

A big chunk of the Wonderful fun lies in exploring all those locations, but the challenge comes from the attempt to accumulate all that stuff as quickly as possible and the player's size is the key. When a level starts, you're just a little bugger, able to grab things like coffee cups and books. Walk over any of these and they become part of the conglomeration of clutter that is your body: a walking pile of trees, lamp posts, baseball bats and whatever else you happened to collect. And as all this stuff sticks to you, you gain bulk and the ability to gather larger and larger objects, until skyscrapers and ships are sucked into your gravitational field.

This 'junk puppet' is one of the game's major technical achievements. The heap of objects appears to have arms and legs made up of recently-collected stuff. And as you grow, the game does a nice job of keeping the camera in scale with you. At first it's nearly at ground-level as you collect flowers and butterflies, and it grows out to a bird's-eye-view as you tower over whole neighborhoods. Occasionally, though, it's possible to get stuck in an area because you grew just enough to make it tough to exit but not enough to absorb the object blocking your way.

Part of the challenge is learning what you can and can't absorb at any given time. Since you've got to rack up as many collections as possible in a set time, you can't afford to waste precious seconds bouncing off objects that aren't your size yet. You've got to keep moving and keep collecting so that you grow large enough to start grabbing people, cars, buses, and rack up a score that counts in the billions.

While Wonderful End of the World probably falls into what's often called the 'casual game' category, that doesn't mean that it isn't challenging. It gives you eleven different main levels to run, and at the end of each, it hands out letter grades, all the way up to A+. If you get at least an A on every level the game unlocks a bonus level. This is easier said than done - after plenty of trying, I'm still working to earn that twelfth level. Although the main missions will take you only a few hours to clear if you're persistent, there's replay value in the game modes unlocked once all eleven standard levels are cleared. For one, you get a reverse-timed mode where the clock counts up and scores you on how long it takes you to clear all the items from a level. And you also get a free exploration mode that allows you to go through the whole level and see all there is to see without the pressure of a clock or score.

If there's a down side to Wonderful End of the World, it's the fact that the gameplay stays essentially the same from one level to the next. Once you've figured out how to maneuver, the challenge lies in finding the best path through a level, the one where you can keep grabbing and growing without wasting any time. This makes each level a challenge in its own right, but it means that you're basically doing the same thing throughout. Still, it's always a pleasure to finally grow to Godzilla size at the end of a level and start rolling up the objects by the dozen.

On the tech side of things, The Wonderful End of the World is a very stable game. The only issue I had was a little bit of camera craziness now and again. As I negotiated some tight corners, my vision might get blocked for a few seconds, but nothing bad enough to keep me from getting where I was going.

The Wonderful End of the World has everything going for it. It's a fun game with a distinctive look and a fun soundtrack. It's a bit short, but the levels are replayable as you try to unlock the bonus level or try for perfect A+ grades across the board. And developer Dejobaan is no newcomer to the games biz - their gameography stretches back to 1999 with a couple of titles released almost every year. Browse their catalog, and you'll find one beautiful game after another, each with a hook that'll have you downloading the demo to see what it's all about. With The Wonderful End of the World as an example of what Dejobaan Games can do, I'm looking forward to playing other games made by them.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
9 of 13 people (69%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 8, 2015
After reading the writeups for this game I had a lot of hopes for it. A simple back-story, vaguely familiar gameplay, and a quirky nature that should have made it a fun game.

Unfortunately, I was quite a fan of Katamari Damacy back in the day... and a few levels into the game I found myself just pining for the original. The movement in this game feels twitchy in comparison (Your pickup radius doesn't increase in size, for example) and doesn't have the same ambience as Katamari.

Overall, I think this game could be a great and fun introduction to a style of game that was unique but is unavailable on PC, but I can't recommend it to existing fans of the genre.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 10
Like a slightly worse Katamari Damacy.

---Pros: Sucking up objects is super fun and satisfying, three modes for each level (including a notime limit mode), lots of unique sets, a nice array of music with variety and generally pretty good.

---Cons: Gamepad support is implemented badly (using a steam controller fixes it), no graphical objects, noticeably framerate drops, and a camera that is just a little too touchy, resulting in jerky movement.

Overall, the only real problems I have with this game are the technical ones, but just sucking up everything in an enviornment is really fun and enjoyable. It's decent and if you think from the trailer that it looks fun, you should get it on sale.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
30 of 35 people (86%) found this review helpful
5 people found this review funny
Recommended
8.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 26, 2013
Probably the best katamari ripoff on PC, may also be the only katamari ripoff on PC.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
66 of 99 people (67%) found this review helpful
18 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
4.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 4, 2014
If you've ever wanted to play a Katamari game, I highly recommend that you do so. They're full of charm, great visual design & music, and a unique, intuitive control scheme.

If, on the other hand, you would like to play a game which has none of those things, this may be right up your alley.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
25 of 29 people (86%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
0.8 hrs on record
Posted: October 15, 2014
Yea!

-You play as a black hole sucking up smaller objects to become bigger
-Lots of different objects
-Nice varity of levels that are each pretty large

Meh!

-Controls are too stiff
-Graphics and animations straight outta 10 years ago, but fit the theme well
-Climbing ramps is a chore, and why can i climb over some objects and not others that are smaller or same size?

Bleh!

-Some items are too difficult to assume they are able to be sucked up next
- Scoring high grades depends on best route memorization method
-No real replay value after seeing everything

The Lowdown:

You play as something that must steal all objects smaller then yourself to get bigger, so you can take in bigger objects before the time runs out. The game is nice for quick 5 or 10 minute runs at a time, but lacks anymore depth to long lasting. Your guy turns like a truck, which can make it difficult to get up some objects, or those real narrow ramps up to upper levels. The graphics while I am not crazy about fit the style quite well, for its cartoony element. There are 12 levels that take place in many different areas that are very spacious, with tons of objects to suck up into yourself.

With the main objective is to find smaller objects then yourself to get bigger, this can be difficult at times as some objects that look smaller won't register as being one that you need.

Once you complete all the levels, you can go back into them and try to best your score, or try some endless modes but I did not find any real appeal in this, but for top score nuts it will.

Verdict:

Worth it in the Dejobaan bundle pack goes on sale, but alone it is not really worth the $10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
25 of 29 people (86%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: January 8, 2012
WEOTW is a very simple game at the core but the above average presentation (the music overall is great) plus the pure arcade goodness of the gameplay shine through and make it a fine diversion for a few hours if you got some spare change in the old steam wallet.

I would have been disappointed paying full price but as part of the dejobaan package or itself on sale it’s a nice acquisition if the idea of accumulating mass by absorbing items until you eat up the whole level itself sounds fun.

There are 2 levels that are troublesome due to collision issues but once you get the hang of them there are optimal routes you can take so that’s not an issue (you can get stuck between tables or if you go under a surface you can end up getting stuck due to increasing your size while under it for example).

The levels are diverse and some are quite clever. It's a simple fun romp while it lasts.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
26 of 34 people (76%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
2.2 hrs on record
Posted: February 20, 2015
Note: video review embedded below.

KATAMARI DO YOU BEST!

Though the King of All Cosmos might be absent, probably busy screwing around with some other corner of the universe, it’s hard to see anything but Katamari Damacy when looking at The Wonderful End of the World. More than that, it’s hard not to see everything that’s missing from Dejobaan Games take on the eccentric Japanese series.

Though both games play more or less identically to each other, giving you control over what amounts to a giant, moving, all inclusive piece of ever expanding velcro to roll up the world in, all the heart and self indulgent absurdity of the Katamari series has been forgotten. Stripped of its character, The Wonderful End of the World is a cold, lifeless clone that only ever served to remind me of how much fun the games that inspired it are and how much I wished I was playing them instead.

But even at a mechanical level, The Wonderful End of the World is clunky and perplexing. Size is no longer the deciding factor in what you can and cannot roll up, instead relying on a number counter which seem to arbitrarily gate certain items until you hit a particular milestone. I was constantly bumping into objects I thought I should be able to pick up, while absorbing ones which seemed too large, leaving me to memorize particular numbers and fail a lot in the process.

I wanted to love The Wonderful End of the World. I was willing to forgive its blatant plagiarism just to have something like it on PC. But it’s such an unapologetic copycat, blandly ripping off other games while having no identity of its own, that it just made me sad and bored. Coming from a studio whose games are often bursting at the seams with personality, The Wonderful End of the World is easily the most uninteresting apocalypse I’ve ever took part in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6trfLdLK24&list=PLmaGkDQUd2inWbUZoSoB7v2zcJ_cJ0VGA&index=3
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
16 of 18 people (89%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.2 hrs on record
Posted: August 8, 2014
As many others have mentioned, this game is basically Katamari Damacy on PC... except it is not as good as the real thing. Not that it's a bad game either, actually I had a lot of fun playing it, it's just that it's very short and has a few gameplay issues. To those not familiar with the Katamari games, the gameplay basically consist of moving around picking up any object/animal/person smaller than you. As you pick up stuff you grow in size and thus are able to absorb bigger stuff. Levels are timed and the goal is to absorb as many objects as possible within the time limit. The main difference is that in the Katamari games you roll a ball around while in The Wonderful End of the World you control a walking humanoid made out of spheres. Now lets get on with the review:

THE GOOD:
- It's Katamari Damacy on PC! The gameplay is the same and, to the best of my knowledge, it's the only Katamari clone in existence, so lets be grateful for having it on PC.

- The music is good for the most part, with some tracks bearing a style very reminiscent of Katamari Damacy (although I found the track from the Word Forge level very annoying).

- Levels are varied in design, there's indoor and outdoor locations and a few themed levels (e.g. Arcadia, Word Forge).

- As you beat levels you can unlock two other gameplay modes: time attack and free exploration. The latter is a blessing for OCD completionists like me ;-)

- Controls are responsive and you can configure the mouse sensitivity. BTW mouse-look provides you with more spatial awareness in comparison with the dual stick controls of Katamari Damacy.

THE BAD:
- Levels are too short and there's too few of them. You have 12 levels clocking around 3-5 minutes each. This means you easily go through the whole game in 2-3 hours if you don't aim for all the achievements, and half of that time will be spent in replaying the levels to get the A grade required to unlock the final level. As reference, I got 100% achievement after 5 hours of gameplay.

- Level design could have been better. All levels are square areas (no around-the-world levels) and there's only a couple of them that deserve to be called big. There's nothing compared to the massive Katamari levels where you can end up engulfing cities, continents, planets and stars.

- Graphics are very simple and rough but get the job done. However, most of the objects are pretty plain, e.g. furniture, dogs, fruits, tools, average people, etc. Half the fun in Katamari was the charm and personality transmitted by the quirky characters and scenes you could find around the levels, they felt truly alive. TBEOTW levels feel more static.

- There's not enough challenge, most levels can be beaten with an A grade in one or two tries. However there's one notable exception: the Internet Cafe is a PITA, I ragequit several times when aiming for the A and A+ grades.

- The sound effects are just meh, I found the standard sound for when you pick up something lame, overused and, eventually, a little bit annoying. There's only a few objects with specific sound effects, (e.g. dogs bark, phones ring).

- There's little replay value. The alternate gameplay modes get old real fast since the levels are very short to begin with, there's not a lot to see. The main use for the free exploration mode will be to tackle a couple of achievements but beyond that there's no secrets or collectibles.

THE UGLY:
- Playing as a walking humanoid is not as intuitive as rolling a Katamari ball: it's difficult to judge your size and contact points with objects. Considering It's a time based game, it's VERY annoying and frustrating when your character gets stuck in a pass that at first glance seems wide enough to get through. Also, as you grow in size it becomes more and more difficult to pick up small objects even though you walk right on top of them, because the walking animation doesn't provide a consistent contact area with the ground.

- Unlike Katamari, in this game it's not size that matters, it's the number of objects you have absorbed what determines which objects you can pick up (eg. the object counter must reach X number for you to be able to pick up Y object). This means that sometimes you can't pick up objects that look small enough and, conversely, sometimes you can pick up objects a tad bigger than you'd expect. So you can't always trust your eyes to plan your pickup routes, you'll be forced to rely in trial and error.

- When you walk against an obstacle you just stop, but sometimes when you walk against a narrow pass you get repelled back a considerable distance. This is annoying as sometimes you get thrown against other obstacles or outside the boundaries of the level, losing many precious seconds as you scramble to get back on track.

CONCLUSION:
The Wonderful End of the World feels like a poor man's Katamari Damacy that conforms with providing the same basic gameplay experience. It plays exactly the same but lacks its charm and challenge. That said, it's a decently fun game, albeit very short and rough around the edges. I wouldn't pay full price for it, but if you're like me and need to scratch your Katamari itch, I think it's worth getting during a sale.
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45 of 71 people (63%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 26, 2014
Imagine if Katamari wasn't fun
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17 of 21 people (81%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Not Recommended
1.9 hrs on record
Posted: October 30, 2014
Fun Katamari Damacy clone that's missing a lot of the charm and humor of that series. Also, it's rather short. I beat it in about an hour and a half and I failed a lot of missions (didn't get an A, but instead an A-, having to repeat some to do the last level), having to do them again.

It's by no means worth the 10 dollars in this case because of that. With a coupon, I was able to get the game for 2.50. If you can get the game for that amount, it's worth it for what it is, but the small playtime and how some of the levels work (getting stuck in between chairs, can't roll up and over things like in katamari damaci such as walls) really get in the way of me recommending it.
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56 of 92 people (61%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.0 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: September 22, 2011
since namco wont make pc katamaris this really poorly made clone exists
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14 of 17 people (82%) found this review helpful
Recommended
2.0 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: November 25, 2013
As much as I like the fellows at Dejobaan games, there's little to say about this. It's like Katamari Damacy: PC Version. Except with an invisible person instead of a little green bugger with a ball. For me personally I thought this game was a riot, since I like the Katamari games anyway and this one was no exception. However, it's not everyone's cup of tea.
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23 of 34 people (68%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: December 28, 2013
As a long time fan of the Katamari, The Wonderful End of the World looked right up my alley. Even though the game was HEAVILY inspired by Katamari, The Wonderful End of the World lacks everything that makes the Katamri franchise so great. The gameplay is very bare bones. All you have at your disposal are the arrow keys (or wasd/equivalent) or a gamepads directional control. There are no camera controls and no jumping despite playing as a bipedal character.

At it's core, the game does what it sets out to do. You start each level as a vaguely humanoid figures made of a floating orbs (like an emaciated Vector Man) who becomes bigger and more fleshed out as he rams into items around the stage and sucks them up. However, there doesn't seem to be any indication of a size goal for each level which is a nuisance when you're trying to achieve an A+ rating in each level. The game also make much effort to indicate how close you are to being able to pick larger objects up. This leads to a lot of running into an object that seems to be the same size or smaller than you and either boucning off of it, (sometimes into multiple other objects too large to pick up, creating a pinball effect) or passing right through it.

The music ranges from kind of terrible to "I guess this is alright" but it very rarely seems to fit the motif of the stage you're in and most of the stage music seems to be loops that you end up hearing several time over through the course of your stuff absorbing. I feel the same way about the game's art as well. It's pretty hit or miss and never particularly great.

The one thing I really like about this game, however, is that each stage is a different theme and in some cases an entirely different artstyle. Although each stage also gave me varying degrees of random frame rate drops for seemingly no reason.
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28 of 44 people (64%) found this review helpful
32 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
2.0 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: January 16, 2015
The only possible benefit to buying this horrible knockoff of Katamari Damacy is I had five less dollars to spend on drugs.

Stay in school kids.
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9 of 9 people (100%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
3.1 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: June 23, 2014
This game was positively... okay. It's an amusing timewaster at best, a really mediocre Katamari rip-off at worst. If this game goes on sale for like, a dollar, if you're really interested, pick it up. Otherwise, stick to something that'll last you longer.

This game is incredibly short. I beat it in about an hour, and the levels aren't particularly interesting. The art style is unique in a pleasant way, but the game looks like a late N64/Early Gamecube release in terms of graphical quality. While there is a lot of fun to be had with collecting objects and slowly moving your way up, the entertainment value wears off quite quickly.
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9 of 9 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: September 26, 2015
Kinda like the Katamari series, except you walk around absorbing stuff instead of rolling a ball.
Perfected in 2 hours. I liked it, get it if it's on sale.
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8 of 8 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 5, 2015
I've never played any of the Katamari Damacy games, but having seen and heard much about them I knew I really wanted to try them out for myself. Sadly, there's no new games being released in the franchise and no way for PC players to get their hands on the originals. The good news is, someone else has stepped up to fill the void.

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, if that's true then this game is seriously flattering the sh*t out of the Katamari Damacy games. But it at least doesn't feel like it's doing it in a gross or cynical way, more like paying tribute or homage to something well-loved and inspirational, making a game that they themselves would want to play and trying to maybe put their own mark on it in some small way. There seems to be a lot of controversy among the community over this fact, over how much is a true display of appreciation and how much is pure shameless rip-off. But strange as it may sound, ultimately, I don't think it really matters all that much here. It's fun and it's not stepping on anyone else's toes, so what's the problem?

Anyway, as for the game itself, there's a story about the world coming to an end and a girl deciding she's going to collect as much stuff as she can before that happens, seemingly with some weird marionette creation that she's controlling, but even the developers don't take this seriously and are just as dismissive of it as everyone else will be. It's pretty much forgotten about just as quickly as it's introduced and used only as a vague excuse to justify the gameplay, which is what this is really all about.

You'll start off as a small, nebulous cloud of tiny, white spheres in vague humanoid arrangement, then gradually absorb small items that you come into contact with, everyday objects like fruit or cans or gummy bears. The more you collect, the bigger you grow, and the bigger you grow, the larger the items you are able to absorb. To begin with you'll only be a few inches high, but by the end of the game you'll be gathering up entire buildings. It's a really satisfying sense of progression you get when an object you were previously bouncing off and being completely dwarfed by, is now a miniscule triviality stuck on the side of your leg.

In each stage you'll have a few minutes to gather up as much as you can and earn a rating at the end, getting a high enough rating in select stages will then unlock further ones for 12 in total (plus 2 additional hidden stages). The short time limit and small stage number makes this game pretty easy to get into for quick blasts of fun, but the downside is it makes the full asking price a little hard to swallow, doubly so given how slapdash and primitive everything looks. It really does look like a game from the 64bit era, maybe with one or two exceptions as later stages introduce new art styles that have a little bit more finesse to them... but only just. I feel like that's part of its charm, though, that it's intentionally bad looking and really not taking itself seriously, given that you're a weird cloud man with benches and dogs and people stuck to him. But if you're a graphics nut, this will likely offend your eyes and cause your ocular nerves great distress and you should probably go elsewhere. Although, if you do that you will be missing out on some great music, which is a much greater step-up in quality over anything you'll see in the game.

If you can pick it up on sale for a price that matches the otherwise cheap and cheerful nature of everything else here, then there's a lot of fun to be had for the hour or two it'll take you to finish. But really, having a blimp for a head or a skyscraper for a leg or becoming a walking ball of panicked people never gets old and is reason enough to try it. If this is really what the end of the world will look like, then roll on, Armageddon!
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