PC Gamer

The Terraria 1.3.1 update that came out in May was released to mark the game's fifth birthday. But the 1.3.2 update that's just gone live is the one that really brings the party.

Literally, I mean: You may now use the Party Girl's Party Center to fire up the festivities, and the town NPCs may start their own under the right conditions. The update also adds party essentials to the game, like balloons (and balloon animals), party hats, streamers, presents, the Pigronata, and more.

Behind the scenes, beehive-type bees have been nerfed in expert mode, unnecessary player synchronization calls have been significantly reduced which should improve performance on servers with high player counts, rain clouds are craftable, town NPCs will try to avoid falling into cliffs when they're away from their home area (the emphasis on try in the patch notes suggests their effort will not be met with great success), and the Sort feature will now work on chests. There are quite a number of bug fixes on tap as well.

Developer Re-Logic said in the 1.3.2 changelog that it's already working on the equally-excitingly-named 1.3.3 update. Details and a release date haven't been nailed down just yet, but the studio said it will focus on the Underground Desert.

PC Gamer

Almost a year after Terraria's monstrous patch 1.3, version 1.3.1 is being released to mark the game's fifth birthday.

From Sunday, May 22, you can embrace your inner electrician thanks to big additions to the wiring system. Logic gates, from AND to XNOR, join the likes of conveyor belts and Large Gem switches.

Controller support is also on the cards. Not all that exciting to your average PC player, no, but it's good to have the option, particularly as the console versions have been doing it since 2013.

Lead developer Cenx has posted a checklist of every fix Re-Logic hopes to cram into 1.3.1 before Sunday. It includes some priority items, like tooltip flickering above 60 fps, and general tidying. My personal favourite: "You can see breath bubbles while dead."

PC Gamer
PC Gamer

Last month, Terraria got its largest update in nearly two years. The 1.3 update was the third major content drop the game has received since it launched in 2011, with dozens of additional updates in between—including a Halloween update and a Christmas update, both of which brought end-game events that are now staples of Terraria's progression. The 1.3 update finally added what developer Re-Logic has called a "final boss" to the game, so I was curious what the future of Terraria held. I caught up with Andrew "Redigit" Spinks, the CEO and Lead Developer at Re-Logic, to talk about what's next for Terraria, mod support, a creative mode, Terraria 2, and yoyos.

PC Gamer: How did the rollout of the 1.3 update go?

Andrew "Redigit" spinks

Andrew "Redigit" Spinks: The launch of 1.3 went better than any of us expected. It is actually out performing our last major update. There were a few bugs that cropped up here and there but we were able to fix a majority of them relatively fast.

How much larger would you say Terraria is now than when it was first launched? (How many new items, enemies, etc.)

Spinks: Since the release of 1.0 we have added 2,827 items, 490 creatures, and loads of new content/features/mechanics. We have made a lot of improvements to the engine and added a lot of new backgrounds and world gen variations. It is crazy how far this game has come since release. It feels like a completely different game now.

Why did you decide to support the game for so long? Why not release DLC or expansions?

Spinks: Making Terraria was always about making a game that I wanted to play. Every time I would think we were done we always found new inspiration to come back and add to the game. Our community has been really good to us and we felt the need to return the favor.

Did you ever consider charging for extra content?

Spinks: No, not really. As a gamer I have never really been a fan of paid DLC.

A teaser image from 1.3's new end-game event. No spoilers!

1.3 added a final boss to Terraria, does that mean the game is actually finished. Is it finally at the point you had originally envisioned it?

Spinks: I was never happy with the idea of Terraria not having a final boss. This will likely be the end of the game's progression, but we do intend to continue updating. There is a lot we can do without pushing progression further. We have a lot of ideas for new mechanics and alternate biomes.

If Steam Early Access had been around in 2011, would Terraria have been an Early Access game? Or did your ambition with the game grow after its release?

Spinks: I would not have done Early Access had that been an option. I would have continued to work on the game until I felt it was ready for release. Because Terraria was leaked, I felt forced to release the game sooner than I would have liked and worked towards getting it to my ideal release state.

I d heard that 1.3 will be the last major content update to Terraria, is that true? If so, why?

Spinks: This will be the last update that I work on personally so it is hard to say what the future holds. That decision will be left up to the team that continues to work on Terraria. We like the idea of switching to smaller more frequent updates moving forward.

We have always felt that Mod Support would be the best final update to Terraria so that the community could keep the game alive.

Any idea of how frequently?

Spinks: Not yet, this is something we will play by ear. It is very dependent on what the team wants to add at the time. If anything, I would say every 1-3 months. We are hitting a limit within the engine so we need to be careful about how we add things.

What s next for Terraria?

Spinks: Terraria will continue to be updated and be expanded upon. Before we finish we would like to look into mod support as well as creative mode. We have always felt that Mod Support would be the best final update to Terraria so that the community could keep the game alive. I think it is great that we have such a passionate community interested in expanding on our game.

Now that 1.3 is done, will you be switching focus to Terraria 2? Can you share any details on it or how it will differ from Terraria?

Spinks: Now that Terraria is done I would like to start working on a new project that is not Terraria 2. I already have a lot of plans and ideas for Terraria 2, but that will be much later.

Can you share anything about that new project?

Spinks: I want to make a game that is very modular, that includes mod support, and makes it very easy for players to add their own content.

An early screenshot of Terraria: Otherworld, which is different from Terraria 2.

How does Terraria: Otherworld factor into your plans for Terraria and Terraria 2?

Spinks: Terraria: Otherworld is more to show another take on Terraria, whereas Terraria 2 will expand upon Terraria much more.

Do you plan to do a similar release and update pattern for your next games? What do you plan to do differently?

Spinks: We will likely stick to this same model since it worked so well for Terraria. I would rather put out games that are more polished than Terraria was at the initial release.

Out of curiosity, can you talk about the addition of One-Drop YoYos to Terraria, and now the creation of a physical Terraria yoyo. That seems like an unexpected partnership, how did it come about?

Spinks: I have been throwing for years and One Drop made some of my favorite yoyos. When I went to add them to the game I thought it would be really cool to add some of the yoyos I have in real life. Once that conversation started we both thought it was a good idea to make the end game yoyo real. I am beyond excited about this partnership.

Thanks very much for your time, Andrew.

PC Gamer

Update: The livestream is over, but you can watch a VOD of the whole thing right here

We saw new biomes like the Underground Desert, new events like Slime Rain, and new items and weapons like the yo-yo! 1.3 is a huge update, even if a lot of the additions and changes are more subtle, like tweaked world generation. And Expert Mode is a severe kick in the pants. Even basic zombies can kill you in two hits, so it's much harder to get a foothold at the start of the game. I am looking forward to exploring the late game when the patch goes live tomorrow, if I can make it that far.

Original: Tomorrow,  Terraria will get its third massive update since it launched in 2011. Once again, the game will be getting a free content drop that adds hundreds of items, new enemies, new modes, updated graphics and sound, and a very long list of more.

We will be livestreaming the 1.3 update to Terraria in its brand new "Expert Mode" today from 2-5pm PDT, ahead of its official release tomorrow. Come watch as we find as much new stuff as we can (and there is a lot) while some of the devs from Re-Logic hang out in Twitch chat. You can watch on the embed above, or  right here on our Twitch channel.

PC Gamer

There have been some incredible computers built in Minecraft using redstone circuitry, but comparatively fewer in its 2D counterpart Terraria.That s probably because although Terraria includes wiring mechanics it doesn t have a built-in creative mode, which makes this sort of work a pretty hardcore pursuit. But not impossible, as YouTuber Joe Price has proved. Price has built a working binary calculator in the game, which can automatically convert binary into decimals and display the results on screen.

Creating the contraption required using a glitch called hoiking . Introduced in Terraria s 1.2 patch, a hoik is a series of sloped blocks which pushes players, NPCs, and items through solid areas almost instantaneously. If a game object is on or inside a sloped block it gets forced towards the top of the slant. So, by lining up multiple slopes, you can force a player from one block into the next, shoving them along at an incredibly fast pace.

Using hoiks, Price is able to push NPCs down pre-built paths and place buttons for them to hit along the way. The button inputs are interpreted as binary, which he can then convert to decimals, and… Well, it s about here that I stop grasping how any of it works, but the results are undeniably impressive. Hoiks! Maths! Burn the witch!

Check the calculator out in the video above. (Special thanks to ZeroGravitas on the Terraria forums for his detailed guide on the history of hoiks.)

PC Gamer
PC Gamer

When Re-Logic announced a follow up to Terraria last month, the studio stopped short of explaining what it actually is. But now we're in the future, a pleasant future bearing details on Terraria: Otherworld, and the gist of these details is that Otherworld adds "strategy and roleplaying" elements to the pixel art sandbox, as well as "purpose", in case building things for no reason isn't your bag.

"Set in an alternate dimension within the Terraria universe, Terraria: Otherworld places the player in a life-and-death struggle to restore a once-pristine world," the update reads. "Along with a rag-tag band of survivors, will you be able to successfully harness the power of an array of weaponry, magic, defenses, and even the world itself to thwart the designs of this unseen evil?"

For every life and death struggle comes the inevitable levelling requirements, and Terraria: Otherworld will add them in spades while still retaining the open-ended nature of the original. That means the story-focused elements won't be linear, the NPCs will do more than just sell stuff, and skill trees are in.

On the topic of "purpose", you'll be tasked with "pushing back the Corruption until it is no more". You'll do this by finding or crafting Purifying Towers and then activating them. Once activated, you'll need to defend them also. That activity forms the basis of the story-driven game, but if all you want to do is explore and build, it sounds like you'll be free to do that, too.

The full details are on the Terraria forum, but no release date beyond a vague 2015 window has been announced. 

PC Gamer

Terraria: Otherworld is a newly announced follow up to the 2011 crafting and survival game, but it's not a sequel, according to the developers. In an announcement on the official Terraria forums, collaborating studios Re-Logic and Engine Software stress repeatedly that it is not a sequel. Which is fine, but what is it?

There's not a heap of information out there at the moment (the studios are inviting fans to speculate on the forum) but according to the official line, Otherworld will "explore what might have been, and approach gameplay in a new direction". 

"Set in an alternate dimension within the Terraria universe, Terraria: Otherworld places the player in a life-and-death struggle to restore a once-pristine world now overrun by a malevolent force that has corrupted nature itself to its original splendor," the announcement presser reads. 

"Along with a rag-tag band of survivors, will you be able to successfully harness the power of an array of weaponry, magic, defenses, and even the world itself to thwart the designs of this unseen evil?"

The game will be on display at GDC next month, so no doubt we'll hear more about it then. In the meantime, why not watch the teaser trailer below, which shows a very familiar looking Terraria setting.

PC Gamer
terrariahalloween


People prepare for the night of ghosts and goblins in different ways. Some go trick-or-treating, while others get so drunk they start believing they are their costume. Only a select few lock themselves away to craft free Halloween updates for their games, and it turns out Terraria’s developers happen belong in the latter group.

Terraria’s “Halloween event” update fills your biome with Halloween-themed pets, costume paintings, gear, and friendly NPCs to sell you those items. Here’s hoping they don’t use your hard-earned cash to egg the impenetrable fortress you spent hours refurbishing. Slain monsters will also drop goodie bags containing “fun surprises” that hopefully won’t include mini bottles of toothpaste or, ugh, pencils. People who give those away on Halloween are the true monsters.

There’s also a “Pumpkin Moon Event” that can be triggered in hard mode. Developer Redigit was light on the details, but made the thing sound like a survival mode where you stave off waves of enemies. The more waves you survive, the better the spoils. The Halloween event lasts until Nov. 10, probably to let you recover from whatever candy coma you fall into.

There are also a bunch of non-Halloween themed bug fixes and balances. I found the most adorable one was “Mice can no longer spawn in hell.” That’s just my personal pick. Feel free to check out the full list and make your own decisions. Or, you could just tinker around while munching on your sugary-dessert of choice—preferably in a soundproof chamber where no doorbell can reach you.
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