Time Gentlemen, Please! and Ben There, Dan That! Special Edition Double Pack
Ben There, Dan That! and Time Gentlemen, Please! are a couple of rip-roaring point-and-click adventure games . With tongue firmly in cheek, sit back, relax, and put your mind to work solving puzzles, and reading some very funny dialogue. It's like a book, only good!
User reviews: Very Positive (325 reviews)
Release Date: Jun 22, 2009

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Buy Time Gentlemen, Please! and Ben There, Dan That! Special Edition Double Pack

 

Recommended By Curators

"An extremely profane and hugely funny take on those 90s LucasArts point and click adventures, full of love and joy for the whole genre."
Read the full review here.

Reviews

one of the most outrageous games I've ever played and for that alone I love it.
- PC Zone – 90%

Funnier than any game in years, and delightfully rude. Point-and-click adventuring done right for a change.
- PC Gamer – 87%

pitch perfect comedy writing…they truly understand how to exploit the genre’s strengths… an indie masterpiece.
-Wired

...excellent scripting, consistent, cartoony design and delight in overtly, overly referential absurdity…even the Telltale titles are clunky and formulaic compared to the anarchistic invention of games like this...
-Eurogamer.net — 9/10

About This Game

Ben There, Dan That! and Time Gentlemen, Please! are a couple of rip-roaring point-and-click adventure games . With tongue firmly in cheek, sit back, relax, and put your mind to work solving puzzles, and reading some very funny dialogue. It's like a book, only good!

From an horrific and untimely death in deep, dark Peru, via preposterous-and-suspect alien invasions, to whipping back-and-forth in time to stop Hitler and his army of robot Nazi dinosaur clones, this is one set of adventures you're unlikely to forget.

Key features:

  • Funny words that'll actually probably make you laugh out loud!
  • Graphics AND sound effects!
  • Thousands of unique responses for almost every action you can think of!
  • NAZI DINOSAURS!

System Requirements

    • OS: Windows
    • Processor: Pretty much anything post-millennial, anything that runs DirectX 9.0c for particle effects.
    • Memory: Anything over 256MB should do, anything that runs DirectX 9.0c for particle effects.
    • Graphics:Any DirectDraw compatible. PixelShader 1.4/ DirectX 9.0c capable card required for particle effects.
    • DirectX®: 9.0c required for particle effects
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB
    • Sound: Any Windows-compatible soundcard
Helpful customer reviews
15 of 18 people (83%) found this review helpful
10.3 hrs on record
Awesome little adventure game! Very creative and with intresting twists!
Expect British humor here and there.
It's a MUST have for it's price! Especially if you are old school adventure-quest player!
Posted: July 3
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10 of 14 people (71%) found this review helpful
9.6 hrs on record
First things first: If you are new to the Point&Click-Adventure Genre, you should not start with this.
Ben and Dan are obviously two veterans of the genre and the games pretty much expect some basic knowledge from you.

I cannot call myself a veteran, but I made it through both games, but I have to admit, that some (or maybe some more) of the puzzles can be mindbendingly puzzling and/or irritating.
I kinda think that that should be part of a P&C, though.

The story itself is pretty hilarious and totally crazy. I think the humour is kinda British but I didn't really have trouble with it. I found the game very funny.

Unless you want this to be your first impression of Point & Click adventures, do get it!
Posted: May 28
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
5.7 hrs on record
These two titles are part one and part two of a single point-and-click adventure game featuring good British humor, several references to classic games of the past, okay puzzles and interesting moments. Both games should take you around 6-7 hours to complete. If you enjoy the genre, you will like this double pack.
Posted: September 28
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
3.5 hrs on record
Ben There, Dan That! [FINISHED] is a point and click adventure game made by a British indie team. The constant British dialect and references make this a great game to play for anyone that is British and the game itself is also very humours and brings a smile to one's face.
The game follows Ben and Dan, two best friends who go on an interesting adventure; the story is amusing to play though and has lots of surrealism throughout.
The problem with this game is that this is a difficult point and click and the graphics are pretty poor. Because of this gameplay and the visuals I cannot recommend this game and the other elements of this game do not make up for it.

Time Gentlemen, Please! [DID NOT FINISH] is essentially more of the same but it has nicer (still not great) graphics and it's gameplay is slightly more fluid and improved.

6/15 - "Interesting, but ugly and difficult to play."
Posted: June 27
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3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
0.2 hrs on record
Ben There, Dan That! and Time Gentlemen, Please! are a pair of the earlier point-and-click games on Steam.

Pros: Humor
Cons: Graphics, Sound, Controls

These two low resolution protagonists, Ben and Dan, will somehow manage to save the world and be funny on their adventures, though not exactly in that order and probably not at the same time. It helps to have some experience with British humor and vocabulary (an aerial is an antenna, for example).

The graphics and sound are poor to say the least. Controls are no better; the majority of actions will be completed with the 'hand' yet it shares equal space with several less useful cursors. Of course, the difficulty is inflated in typical point-and-click fashion (thermos on lava, it all makes sense!).

With the number and availability of free and high quality point-and-click games nowadays, these two have difficulty standing out.

4/10
Posted: June 17
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83 of 99 people (84%) found this review helpful
9.7 hrs on record
This is a review of the first game of this bundle: Ben There, Dan That.

Ben There, Dan That! is an adventure game in the purest tradition of the genre. If you’ve played LucasArts adventures in the 90’s, you are in familiar territory (and also, lucky). Same if you played 90’s Sierra titles (except you weren’t so lucky). Indeed, you’ll find again every emblematic ingredient: look/use/talk/walk commands, inventory management, branching dialogs, humour…

The story begins with our two heroes, Ben and Dan (who happen to be digital incarnations of the game designers) coming home from a jungle expedition, just in time for watching Magnum P.I. on the TV. Unfortunately, the aerial is broken and you must help our heroes fix it. It very soon happens that Ben and Dan get abducted by aliens in the process. They (and you) must therefore navigate through alternative dimensions if you want to go back home.


There are three areas in which Ben There, Dan That! shine. The first is its humour. It is plentiful and very funny. It touches on many topics and doesn’t avoid controversy (positive discrimination of handicapped workers gets laughed at, for instance). It’s neither politically correct nor polite. Ben and Dan are not above “penis” and “♥♥♥♥♥♥” jokes. So it may not be to everyone’s taste. Most of the humour, however, consists of meta-jokes, aimed at adventure game mechanisms themselves. Those are equally funny, although by the end of the game, that theme will have overstayed its welcome. It also means you probably won’t enjoy the game that much if you’re not an adventure game veteran.

The second remarkable feature is the puzzles themselves. Despite the completely bonkers story, the puzzles remain logical and avoid frustration for the player, without feeling childish like the recent horde of “casual” adventure games. I didn’t need a walkthrough in order to beat this adventure and I never stayed stuck for long. Despite the relative easiness, my intelligence never felt insulted. It was therefore the perfect balance for me.

Polish is the last award-deserving area. In other adventure games, when you are bumping against a particularly devious (or illogical) puzzle, it is common to start trying everything, using every inventory item on every element in the room. Here, because the puzzles are not very difficult, it is rarely necessary to do so. But I encourage you to adopt that behaviour nonetheless. Because almost all combinations, stupid or smart, have been thought of by the developers and there is almost always a funny line of dialog to reward any desperate action. It’s really remarkable, as other games too often punish you with something bland, along the lines of “I can’t do that” whenever you try something original/stupid.

There are weaker aspects to the game though. The story is unimpressive. And despite their individual qualities, the environments (or “rooms”) lack coherence. The game universe feels disjointed and the “parallel dimensions” premise doesn't really excuse that.

I'm not a big fan of the technical aspects either. The art style is primitive and something of an acquired taste. The backgrounds are made to look goofy but mostly they are bordering on the ugly. I got used to it in the end, but it means I didn't get a very good first impression. The animations are very basic, and frankly idiotic. I know some will defend them, but to me it looked stupid without looking funny. The best that can be said about the music is that it is unobtrusive. It must also be said that there is no voice acting, but that can hardly be held against the game.

If you can live with the graphics, and if you've played enough adventure games to appreciate the meta-humour, then by all means, I recommend you purchase the game. It's funny and it's designed with care and attention to details. It's enough to pleasantly fill the better part of a lazy Sunday afternoon.
Posted: November 26, 2013
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