Something ancient and evil is stirring in Victorian England. Only you can stop it. Journey to the brink of madness and beyond as you set forth alone into the dark.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (23 reviews) - 91% of the 23 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Overwhelmingly Positive (502 reviews) - 95% of the 502 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: May 20, 2014

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Buy The Last Door - Season One

Buy The Last Door Collector's Edition Bundle BUNDLE (?)

Includes 2 items: The Last Door - Season One, The Last Door Season 2

 

Reviews

“A love letter to H.P. Lovecraft.”
Penny Arcade

“Off to a promisingly frightening start.”
Gamespot

“I experienced genuine chills.”
Joystiq

Steam Greenlight

About This Game

Feel what it's truly like to be alone in the dark with this low-res, high-suspense point-and-click horror adventure, winner of multiple Best Games of the Year awards. Set in Victorian England, when Jeremiah Devitt receives a letter from his old schoolmate Anthony Beechworth with a hidden, cryptic message, he knows something is wrong. His journey to an abandoned manor is only the beginning as he starts to remember a long-buried secret from his youth, discovering things man was not meant to know, and opening doors that should have remained closed…

The Last Door: Collector’s Edition contains four terrifying episodes of occult and otherworldly horror inviting you to investigate Victorian England's deepest, darkest secret. Featuring new scenes and puzzles, enhanced graphics, unlockable bonuses, and remastered sound. Explore ancient manors, decaying tenements, and twisting underground warrens with little but a lamp and magnifying glass to guide you. Dare you open The Last Door: Collector's Edition?

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS: Microsoft Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
    • Processor: Intel Atom 1.6 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Integrated with 64 MB RAM
    • Storage: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Recommended:
    • OS: Microsoft Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
    • Processor: Dual Core 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Dedicated with 128 MB RAM
    • Storage: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Minimum:
    • OS: OSX Leopard
    • Processor: Intel Atom 1.6 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Integrated with 64 MB RAM
    • Storage: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Recommended:
    • OS: OSX Leopard
    • Processor: Dual Core 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Dedicated with 128 MB RAM
    • Storage: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Very Positive (23 reviews)
Overall:
Overwhelmingly Positive (502 reviews)
Recently Posted
Obey the Fist!
( 1.5 hrs on record )
Posted: May 24
This could have been a fairly playable point and click adventure, but the developer chose not to hire any artists and just sort of bash out some low effort pixels.

Technically, the game works but lacks any reasonable PC graphics settings or interface settings. Resolution is fixed, overall a very poor effort.

Graphics are extremely low effort and lazy, opting for the pixel style when it doesn't particularly make sense to.

Gameplay is the old and done point and click puzzle/adventure style, which is fine but no particular innovation has been undertaken to add anything that games decades older than this don't already achieve.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
crow506
( 4.5 hrs on record )
Posted: May 22
An elegant and moody masterpiece of Victorian horror.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
One Man Army
( 6.2 hrs on record )
Posted: May 16
When i first started playing this game, i had a good feeling about it because of the way the story started. I liked the macabre development and the 1800s english setting in low resolution. I thought this was going one of those lower budget games with a great story. I was hooked.

Having just now completed the game, I'm sorry to say that I am disappointed. This game feels like an originally decent story has been spread over not only multiple episodes but also multiple seasons. What I mean is that the pace of this game has been slowed down to make it fit in episodes and the ending has been postponed. This kind of manipulation to a game concept is unfortunate for two reasons:

First, when i bought the game, I thought i was buying a full game. The title does say "The Last Door - Collector's Edition". Episodes are fine as they can also be viewed as chapters to a story, but being told at the end of the game that there's a season 2 coming up was unsettling (I wouldn't expect a collector's edition for only part of a story). I felt like a kid being the end of his bedtime story. No way i can sleep.

Second, because the game makers are trying to fit the story in a predetermined marketing plan, the story feels broken. For example, the story slowly unravels through the first three episodes only to crash with an ending on episode 4 that does not make sense at all. I felt frustrated because I had been very patient with the first episodes to try to make sense of the story and then suddenly we jump to a conclusion which cannot be explained by any of what was told prior... Did I miss something? I'm pretty sure I didn't. It was so slow I had plenty of time to gather everything.

The Last Door had a good concept to build upon and I think it could have been a great game if the focus had been on unraveling the story and keeping the player hooked rather than building around an episode/season system.

There are also problems with the game mechanics. I had to use a walkthrough in order to progress in the game. There were quite a few instances where I didn't know what to do because the required actions didn't make much sense. Also, the story is being told through text at the bottom of the screen, but sometimes you need sound in order to understand what you have to do. I think it would have been a good thing to add text-based cues of what's going on because I personnally didn't hear the crucial sounds until I read about them in the walkthroughs and boosted the volume up.

My final verdict: i do not recommend the game and will not be playing season 2. I've lost interest in the story. Good concept, nice pixel art, though.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
jartur
( 3.7 hrs on record )
Posted: May 14
This season is more 'horrory' and there are few jump-scares I didn't care for but still I have enjoyed it. Very straightforward, so pretty short because of that but I think it takes just right amount of time to complete.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
TheDContinuum
( 5.3 hrs on record )
Posted: May 12
Product received for free
The Last Door is a pixelated adventure/suspense game. (Not really horror, though there are some jump scares and some blood and icky stuff, but it's highly pixelated, so keep that in mind.) The story starts off relatively benign as you play a character in Victorian-esque times, investigating his old friend's suicide. As time goes on, you start uncovering your own odd, disturbing, mysterious past. The first season has 4 episodes, and the collector's edition includes some mini-games that give you a little more insight into the events of the season, and are worth a quick 15 minutes.

Pros:
+Story. There is tons of it. It's creepy, it's unnerving, and it's wonderful. I really, REALLY hate horror games, but this was glorious. Not too gorey, not a ton of jump scares, but just enough to keep you on your toes.
+Good puzzles. None of them are too challenging (though a few of them are obvious but make you go "Who on earth would ever do that?")

Neutral:
~Art style. It may be pixelated, but it is HIGHLY pixelated, almost to the point of you going "What the heck is that thing?" It leaves a lot to the imagination, which I would rate as a positive, but a lot of people might be turned off by it.
~Length. Each episode is only about an hour long each, so I finished all the episodes in about 4-5 hours including some AFK idling. I really don't mind the length, because you never end up with "Adventure game fatigue" where you're wandering around aimlessly trying to solve a long series of puzzles. This is short and sweet. Still, some people might feel ripped off at full price. I got it as a gift so I loved it despite the length.

Con:
-Season 1 ends on a cliffhanger, so you're committed to buying Season 2 to finish the story (if they even finish it then. I hope they're not planning a really long story that gets so convoluted you'll never get a satisfactory ending.)

10/10. I really like this game and look forward to playing Season 2 when I buy it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Khorps
( 0.2 hrs on record )
Posted: May 9
I'v been following the development of the Last Door series since epsiode 1 was released.

Now for the memes










2spooky4u
Helpful? Yes No Funny
pyrocraziac
( 4.0 hrs on record )
Posted: May 1
I was supplied with this key by the developer, this however did not affect the review. All my developer sponsored reviews are positive because I review games that I like!

═══════════════════════════════════
OVERVIEW

The Last Door

This is a point and click horror adventure. It pushes a cerebral examination of philosphy such as Aldous Huxley's The Education of an Amphibian combined with the void chapter in A Book of Five Rings. The end result is an atmospheric horror game surrounding the darker side of what happend when you look within for an explanation of the universe around us.

http://store.steampowered.com/app/284390/

═══════════════════════════════════
PROS & CONS

Pros

  • Amazing soundtrack really adds to the feel of the game
  • No petty jump scares
  • The pixel art adds ambiguity further aiding to the horro by provoking your imagination
  • The puzzles make logical sense and never stall the game

Cons

  • Season 2 is a separate game altogether

You can check out season 2 here:
http://store.steampowered.com/app/402530/

═══════════════════════════════════
SUMMARY & FINAL RATING

Normally I stay away from horror games. I am truly glad I gave this one a try. This is the perfect example of horror done right. The story is well thought out and is pieced together from a narrative while being supplemented by letters scattered throughout the areas. If Five Nights at Freddy's is your idea of a good horror game, move along. If you think the philosophy of the unkown is a good premise for horror, this might become your favorite game.

9/10
═══════════════════════════════════

For more recommendations and reviews on our favourite up and coming quality games follow Lot's O Giveaway's group curations here !
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Pointnclickster
( 14.4 hrs on record )
Posted: April 27
If you had told me that a point & click game with highly pixelated graphics would prove to be a disturbing and genuinely creepy experience, I would have been skeptical. I never believed that a point and click game could be scary...until now.

The Last Door takes its inspiration straight from the masters of horror: H.P. Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe. The story and themes draw on various themes that they wrote about, and it is done in such a way that those who are familiar with their works will appreciate the homage done to them. For those who have not read their work, they will be chilled by this dark and disturbing story...and hopefully get interested and read the source material.

Now, if you are willing to give the pixelated graphics a chance, I think you will be amazed at how they lend themselves to the story and the overrall tone of the game. This game takes place in the Victorian time period, and the graphics call back to an earlier time as well. The disturbing scenes, I believe, are made to be even creepier in pixelated form.

I love the music in this game. It really captures the tone of a dark, gothic, Victorian, horror story. The lighting, music, and overrall atmosphere create an atmosphere of dread in which you know there will not be a happy ending.

The puzzles themselves are not difficult, but very intuitive. The gameplay is a standard point-and-click format. The episodes themselves are not that long. This game could probably be beaten in a few hours. The only negative I could find (this is a tiny nitpick) is that there are certain Easter eggs in the game, and to discover them, you really need a guide. It's not a matter of exploring everywhere, but making sure that the timing is right to unlock said Easter eggs. However, the overrall gaming experience is not hindered by this.

Since this is The Last Door Season 1, the game ended on quite a cliffhanger. It wrapped up enough questions answered but left enough to ponder and anticipate for Season 2. I am really looking forward to continuing the story.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kai
( 9.2 hrs on record )
Posted: April 26
Absolutely brilliant! Don't let the graphics fool you, because this was one of the most well-made games that I have ever had the pleasure of playing. I enjoyed it so much that I even bought The Last Door: Season 2 and completed that as well. I couldn't bring myself to touch another game in my library until I had completed it. Rarely, do I go out of my way to get all achievements for a game unless I find it to be extraordinarily fun. The Last Door series is one of those games. If you haven't played this, then you are seriously missing out! I strongly encourage anyone who loves a good story and puzzles to play this series! My fingers are crossed to hopefully see more of this series in future. Best of luck to the developers - you're astounding!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Rockheart
( 4.2 hrs on record )
Posted: April 24
Horror masterpiece. Very much recommended.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Vic=HKC=
( 6.3 hrs on record )
Posted: April 16
Jeremiah DeWitt receives a letter from an old schoolmate. However, this cryptic message prompts him to go to his friend's manor as he's aware that something had gone wrong. This is his first step towards madness, horror, darkness...

The Last Door is an episodic game, with four chapters. All of them is following DeWitt's fate and search for the truth. But while you're witnessing his adventure, cutscenes show also a doctor being worried for DeWitt and began to search for him. The plot is full of mystery, the more you're going forward, the less you can grasp the reality of the whole story. Well, it's still very foggy for me though I may have a general idea of what's happening. No wonder that there is a second season where you're the doctor...

The Letter

The Letter is the beginning of DeWitt's adventure. He's investigating his friend's manor. Everything seems normal but when you know where to look, it seems that this manor has seen a tragedy...

Memories

DeWitt, after finding his friend's body, comes back to his boarding school, now an hospice. Searching for clues to explain what's happening to his schoolmates, he begins to remember what they have done back then...

The Four Witnesses

After being knocked down by his ancient teacher's servant and after discovering the horrifying truth, DeWitt finds himself in one of these creepy neighboorhoods of London. A man seems to appear and to disappear, like he was inviting DeWitt to follow him...

Ancient Shadows

DeWitt found himself in a remote manor, where one of his classmates are residing. However, while investigating it, everything seems to suggest that Alexandre has gone far into his research...

As you can see, the more you're advancing in the story, the more horror you'll discover. Besides, be prepare yourself to some scares (I got one) and to people that aren't real (or are they just a fragment of DeWitt's imagination?).

The Last Door is a great example of how a plot must be delivered. Not too revealing at the beginning and then only, plant some clues and hints that will put a seed of doubt in your mind, until you're arriving at the end without too much clarity but with a general idea of what's happening.

The gameplay is a point-and-click: you have items to examine, to take, to combine and to use. You have also some puzzles, though they're a rarity in the game. Your inventory is in the bottom of your screen, making it easier for you to use objects. It's staying in place, never going down. You speak also with people: you can choose your lines, however, while some can be always asked, other ones are very important. And when you have a new piece of information, you can question again people.

You have also notes to read in all chapters, which will give you some clues on what's going on. Also, you can hunt some paranormal or strange actions, however, they're often secrets requiring to be fast or to avoid to do something or to just stay for a few minutes where you are.

However, be prepared also to some slow passages. Indeed, when DeWitt is holding a lantern, you're walking slowy, without any fast footstep. There is also a passage where he's kinda out of it, so, be patient.

The graphics are belonging to the retro era. I mean by that it's pixelised like a good old adventure game. You can't see any of the reactions of the characters, however, every area of interest are shown thanks to a magnifying glass with a yellow border.

The soundtrack is also captivating. It's really fitting to the story and to the atmosphere. I really like the opening.

The Last Door is really a masterpiece for the price. It's one of the best little adventure games that I've played. Everything is nearing perfection or is perfect. Go for it!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Raid
( 9.0 hrs on record )
Posted: April 15
The Last Door is a point and click adventure game that is the amalgamation of influences from many of the giants of weird and horror fiction including Poe, Lovecraft, Chambers, Machen, and Mauppasant. It's a fascinating and intriguing story mixed with very fun point and click mechanics, and one of the most atmospheric and engaging point and click games I've played. The pixel graphics are very effective for suggesting a simple and pleasing Victorian tone while creating a distant feeling of ambiguous disconnect which, when combined with the incredible soundtrack, heightens the sense of tension and unknown. Each of the settings in the game work extremely well as the structure on which to hang the atmosphere and mystery.

There are four episodes, as well as four 'extra' episodes that can be played upon completion of the game. Each of the episodes can be completed in about an hour or so, depending on the player's ability to solve the puzzles which can occasionally prove strangely challenging (in the one or two instances where the solutions feel contrived). Thankfully this only happens once or twice, and the territory to cover by the player isn't that large so exploration isn't too much of a problem. The four post-game, mini-episodes serve to heighten the story and take only a few minutes to complete. The real draw here, far beyond the gameplay, is the well-written story. The first half of The Last Door satisfies the weird fiction fan in me very well, and it promises to deliver in season 2. During my second playthrough I took notes on each of the four chapters to really dig into the story and I was rewarded by the layers of intrigue the writers have included, especially with the four mini-episodes. It's worth specifically mentioning the music, again, as it really does take a game that would be good, and makes it great. The subtle piano and string mixture brings the Victorian era to life.

The only negative, as suggested above, and this is a far too oft seen trait in point and click games, are the sometimes extremely contrived item uses in order to solve puzzles. It rings hollow when you are required to utilize an item in an extremely odd way that even the character in the game may consider with raised eyebrows.

With that said, The Last Door is one of my favorite Steam games, and one of the most true spirited games based on the weird fiction genre that I've played. Highly recommended for those who enjoy point and clicks as well as weird fiction - this will be one of your favorites. I enjoyed it enough to play it through a second time to prepare for the full release of the second season and have hopeful expectations that the story will have a thrilling and suitably weird fiction style ending.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Faudraline
( 7.6 hrs on record )
Posted: April 13
Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
“Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
’Tis the wind and nothing more!” - Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven


I vaguely remember encountering a prologue to a title named The Last Door in Kongregate a couple years ago, but I dropped participating Kongregate community sometime thereon, so it was a complete surprise encountering the full game here in Steam later. A quick research informed me about the Kickstarter journey of The Game Kitchen and how wonderful a job they managed to put on the table with limited participation on backers and pixel art graphics only. Recently completing the first season, here will be my part actual review and part fangirl rant for Victorian Gothic - especially for the concept of horror itself.

It's 1891, England. Jeremiah Devitt receives an unsettling letter from his old friend, Anthony Beechworth, with whom he attended a boarding school in Aberdeen years ago. The letter contains one sentence only that would be vaguely familiar to Devitt: "Videte ne quis sciat", the long forgotten motto of the philosophy club they formed as young boys back in the boarding school. Knowing his old friend would only use this sentence as a distress call, Devitt leaves his apartment and catches the first train to Sussex to visit Beechworth residence. From thereon, his journey towards the unknown, the unspeakable and the unforeseeable will begin. In his journey for discovering the truth, Devitt will slowly yet surely pass the veil that separates the wisdom from the insanity, reaching for the knowledge of "Malum in se" or rather: evil within itself.

As one can get a grasp of the narration so far, The Last Door is a fine product of horror literature, inspired heavily from the works of Poe, Lovecraft, Maupassant, Borges, Machen and many others; playing on the horror of the unknown, the unexplainable or more so: the uncanny. Today, literary academics make clear differentiations between the notions of fear, terror and the horror. Fear is an instantaneous reaction or at least a basic worry, while the terror is being continuously under some kind of threat. With terror, you can fundamentally foresee and understand the threat that would befall on you, yet fail to resolve it or prevent it with a conclusion. With horror, on the other hand, you are rendered incapable of even grasping the meaning, the reason or the nature of the threat altogether, rendering your cognitive ability useless… and that specific kind of threat is the most fundamental, basic and dreadful experience anyone can go under. So dreadful, the narrative medium of language fails to describe its nature exactly, presenting only vague descriptions of associations. Being a masterfully arranged horror adventure, The Last Door is one of such experiences.

Establishing a horror adventure with pixel art graphics might seem like a repelling choice for most people, but I find part game's success in this specific display choice. With pixel art graphics, we are not always capable of understanding direct depictions of objects, nuances or happenstances. We are left with symbolic environment designs that are presented to arrange a vague image, a symbol for the actual. It is both familiar yet quite so alien at the same time. Freud's 1835 Article, Das Unheimliche or The Uncanny describes this specific notion as a cognitive dissonance; for being attracted and repulsed by a concept at the same time. This paradoxical nature deems a state or a being uncanny - and quite possibly dangerous. This fundamental concept perpetuated the fear of the unknown and established the foundation of all horror literature that will follow involuntarily. The art display in the game is an excellent example of Freud's Uncanny. Everything is somewhat familiar yet boundlessly alien at the same time. This psychodynamic arranges a triumphant baseline for the atmosphere. The same notion is supported by brilliantly picked sound effects and orchestrated soundtrack – ordinary and beautiful, yet unexplainable and unsettling at the same time - to exalt the setting.

Aside its psychological undertone, The Last Door is an episodic point & click adventure. Each chapter follows the one before to portray the first season of Jeremiah Devitt's unsettling journey. You are to roam within a limited environment in each chapter; collecting notes, items; interacting with people and solving puzzles to make the story progress. Even with the chosen style of graphics, it’s not that hard to notice and interact with objects. Puzzles take brief contemplation at first, but when figured, they are spot on and elegant. Anecdotes and nuances collected from the most memorable Gothic literary pieces are masterfully nestled into the game for your discovery. The primary motifs of the game - crows, or rather ravens - are a direct reference to Poe alongside countless others.

If you are interested in the collective experience that would portray the totality of The Last Door, you are in for a literary feast with imageries worthy of nightmarish depictions scribbled into your subconscious. It is a remarkable example of sheer success for both narrative and atmosphere without much graphic display. Recommended to be played with headphones and in total darkness!

Please also check out Lady Storyteller's Curator page here - follow for regular updates on reviews for other games!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Gucek001
( 6.5 hrs on record )
Posted: April 13
moody, stylish, rich Lovecraftian.. (duh!) ..story. highly recommended.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
🎩NeilYoung🎸
( 6.1 hrs on record )
Posted: April 7
♥♥♥♥ it
Helpful? Yes No Funny
ChivasPL
( 6.2 hrs on record )
Posted: April 2
The horryfing game with an interesting story.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kel-nage
( 4.7 hrs on record )
Posted: April 1
Excellent little point-and-click adventure game, dripping with a Lovecraftian horror theme. Gave me the chills at several points (definitely best played with headphones on).
Helpful? Yes No Funny
him pants
( 3.5 hrs on record )
Posted: March 15
A fun point-and-click game. I enjoyed it for what it was.

Pros:
+Puzzles make sense
+Smooth movement
+Unique mechanic where you can fast-forward past a door you've already gone through, makes movement very fast
+Gripping atmosphere, a few spooks
+Interesting story

Neutral
~The pixel art can be divisive. It does not hinder gameplay at all, but some people don't like it. Take a look at the game screenshots provided; if you're okay with that kind of art then you won't have a problem with the game.

Cons:
-Story is not finished. I was not aware of this, since I didn't see "Season One" in the title. It seems like Season Two is still in Early Access as well, so don't expect a conclusion soon.
EDIT: The second season is out and it seems to be the conclusion.



All in all, if you enjoy point-and-click adventure games or games that have a lovecraftian feel you should definitely buy it. Otherwise I suggest playing the first episode for free on their website, and then deciding.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Survival
( 3.6 hrs on record )
Posted: March 15
Excellent point and click horror adventure game. The sound design and music are out of this world and the story is well written and compelling. Amazing atmosphere helped by the low-fi graphics that play with your mind when needed. Strongly recommended.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Beacri
( 11.1 hrs on record )
Posted: March 12
I was playing this series since their first publication on Kongregate. Now, I'm waiting for MOAR!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
20 of 22 people (91%) found this review helpful
Recommended
14.4 hrs on record
Posted: April 27
If you had told me that a point & click game with highly pixelated graphics would prove to be a disturbing and genuinely creepy experience, I would have been skeptical. I never believed that a point and click game could be scary...until now.

The Last Door takes its inspiration straight from the masters of horror: H.P. Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe. The story and themes draw on various themes that they wrote about, and it is done in such a way that those who are familiar with their works will appreciate the homage done to them. For those who have not read their work, they will be chilled by this dark and disturbing story...and hopefully get interested and read the source material.

Now, if you are willing to give the pixelated graphics a chance, I think you will be amazed at how they lend themselves to the story and the overrall tone of the game. This game takes place in the Victorian time period, and the graphics call back to an earlier time as well. The disturbing scenes, I believe, are made to be even creepier in pixelated form.

I love the music in this game. It really captures the tone of a dark, gothic, Victorian, horror story. The lighting, music, and overrall atmosphere create an atmosphere of dread in which you know there will not be a happy ending.

The puzzles themselves are not difficult, but very intuitive. The gameplay is a standard point-and-click format. The episodes themselves are not that long. This game could probably be beaten in a few hours. The only negative I could find (this is a tiny nitpick) is that there are certain Easter eggs in the game, and to discover them, you really need a guide. It's not a matter of exploring everywhere, but making sure that the timing is right to unlock said Easter eggs. However, the overrall gaming experience is not hindered by this.

Since this is The Last Door Season 1, the game ended on quite a cliffhanger. It wrapped up enough questions answered but left enough to ponder and anticipate for Season 2. I am really looking forward to continuing the story.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.7 hrs on record
Posted: May 14
This season is more 'horrory' and there are few jump-scares I didn't care for but still I have enjoyed it. Very straightforward, so pretty short because of that but I think it takes just right amount of time to complete.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.5 hrs on record
Posted: May 22
An elegant and moody masterpiece of Victorian horror.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: May 9
I'v been following the development of the Last Door series since epsiode 1 was released.

Now for the memes










2spooky4u
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 90 days
47 of 50 people (94%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.6 hrs on record
Posted: April 13
Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
“Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
’Tis the wind and nothing more!” - Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven


I vaguely remember encountering a prologue to a title named The Last Door in Kongregate a couple years ago, but I dropped participating Kongregate community sometime thereon, so it was a complete surprise encountering the full game here in Steam later. A quick research informed me about the Kickstarter journey of The Game Kitchen and how wonderful a job they managed to put on the table with limited participation on backers and pixel art graphics only. Recently completing the first season, here will be my part actual review and part fangirl rant for Victorian Gothic - especially for the concept of horror itself.

It's 1891, England. Jeremiah Devitt receives an unsettling letter from his old friend, Anthony Beechworth, with whom he attended a boarding school in Aberdeen years ago. The letter contains one sentence only that would be vaguely familiar to Devitt: "Videte ne quis sciat", the long forgotten motto of the philosophy club they formed as young boys back in the boarding school. Knowing his old friend would only use this sentence as a distress call, Devitt leaves his apartment and catches the first train to Sussex to visit Beechworth residence. From thereon, his journey towards the unknown, the unspeakable and the unforeseeable will begin. In his journey for discovering the truth, Devitt will slowly yet surely pass the veil that separates the wisdom from the insanity, reaching for the knowledge of "Malum in se" or rather: evil within itself.

As one can get a grasp of the narration so far, The Last Door is a fine product of horror literature, inspired heavily from the works of Poe, Lovecraft, Maupassant, Borges, Machen and many others; playing on the horror of the unknown, the unexplainable or more so: the uncanny. Today, literary academics make clear differentiations between the notions of fear, terror and the horror. Fear is an instantaneous reaction or at least a basic worry, while the terror is being continuously under some kind of threat. With terror, you can fundamentally foresee and understand the threat that would befall on you, yet fail to resolve it or prevent it with a conclusion. With horror, on the other hand, you are rendered incapable of even grasping the meaning, the reason or the nature of the threat altogether, rendering your cognitive ability useless… and that specific kind of threat is the most fundamental, basic and dreadful experience anyone can go under. So dreadful, the narrative medium of language fails to describe its nature exactly, presenting only vague descriptions of associations. Being a masterfully arranged horror adventure, The Last Door is one of such experiences.

Establishing a horror adventure with pixel art graphics might seem like a repelling choice for most people, but I find part game's success in this specific display choice. With pixel art graphics, we are not always capable of understanding direct depictions of objects, nuances or happenstances. We are left with symbolic environment designs that are presented to arrange a vague image, a symbol for the actual. It is both familiar yet quite so alien at the same time. Freud's 1835 Article, Das Unheimliche or The Uncanny describes this specific notion as a cognitive dissonance; for being attracted and repulsed by a concept at the same time. This paradoxical nature deems a state or a being uncanny - and quite possibly dangerous. This fundamental concept perpetuated the fear of the unknown and established the foundation of all horror literature that will follow involuntarily. The art display in the game is an excellent example of Freud's Uncanny. Everything is somewhat familiar yet boundlessly alien at the same time. This psychodynamic arranges a triumphant baseline for the atmosphere. The same notion is supported by brilliantly picked sound effects and orchestrated soundtrack – ordinary and beautiful, yet unexplainable and unsettling at the same time - to exalt the setting.

Aside its psychological undertone, The Last Door is an episodic point & click adventure. Each chapter follows the one before to portray the first season of Jeremiah Devitt's unsettling journey. You are to roam within a limited environment in each chapter; collecting notes, items; interacting with people and solving puzzles to make the story progress. Even with the chosen style of graphics, it’s not that hard to notice and interact with objects. Puzzles take brief contemplation at first, but when figured, they are spot on and elegant. Anecdotes and nuances collected from the most memorable Gothic literary pieces are masterfully nestled into the game for your discovery. The primary motifs of the game - crows, or rather ravens - are a direct reference to Poe alongside countless others.

If you are interested in the collective experience that would portray the totality of The Last Door, you are in for a literary feast with imageries worthy of nightmarish depictions scribbled into your subconscious. It is a remarkable example of sheer success for both narrative and atmosphere without much graphic display. Recommended to be played with headphones and in total darkness!

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6 of 8 people (75%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.3 hrs on record
Posted: April 16
Jeremiah DeWitt receives a letter from an old schoolmate. However, this cryptic message prompts him to go to his friend's manor as he's aware that something had gone wrong. This is his first step towards madness, horror, darkness...

The Last Door is an episodic game, with four chapters. All of them is following DeWitt's fate and search for the truth. But while you're witnessing his adventure, cutscenes show also a doctor being worried for DeWitt and began to search for him. The plot is full of mystery, the more you're going forward, the less you can grasp the reality of the whole story. Well, it's still very foggy for me though I may have a general idea of what's happening. No wonder that there is a second season where you're the doctor...

The Letter

The Letter is the beginning of DeWitt's adventure. He's investigating his friend's manor. Everything seems normal but when you know where to look, it seems that this manor has seen a tragedy...

Memories

DeWitt, after finding his friend's body, comes back to his boarding school, now an hospice. Searching for clues to explain what's happening to his schoolmates, he begins to remember what they have done back then...

The Four Witnesses

After being knocked down by his ancient teacher's servant and after discovering the horrifying truth, DeWitt finds himself in one of these creepy neighboorhoods of London. A man seems to appear and to disappear, like he was inviting DeWitt to follow him...

Ancient Shadows

DeWitt found himself in a remote manor, where one of his classmates are residing. However, while investigating it, everything seems to suggest that Alexandre has gone far into his research...

As you can see, the more you're advancing in the story, the more horror you'll discover. Besides, be prepare yourself to some scares (I got one) and to people that aren't real (or are they just a fragment of DeWitt's imagination?).

The Last Door is a great example of how a plot must be delivered. Not too revealing at the beginning and then only, plant some clues and hints that will put a seed of doubt in your mind, until you're arriving at the end without too much clarity but with a general idea of what's happening.

The gameplay is a point-and-click: you have items to examine, to take, to combine and to use. You have also some puzzles, though they're a rarity in the game. Your inventory is in the bottom of your screen, making it easier for you to use objects. It's staying in place, never going down. You speak also with people: you can choose your lines, however, while some can be always asked, other ones are very important. And when you have a new piece of information, you can question again people.

You have also notes to read in all chapters, which will give you some clues on what's going on. Also, you can hunt some paranormal or strange actions, however, they're often secrets requiring to be fast or to avoid to do something or to just stay for a few minutes where you are.

However, be prepared also to some slow passages. Indeed, when DeWitt is holding a lantern, you're walking slowy, without any fast footstep. There is also a passage where he's kinda out of it, so, be patient.

The graphics are belonging to the retro era. I mean by that it's pixelised like a good old adventure game. You can't see any of the reactions of the characters, however, every area of interest are shown thanks to a magnifying glass with a yellow border.

The soundtrack is also captivating. It's really fitting to the story and to the atmosphere. I really like the opening.

The Last Door is really a masterpiece for the price. It's one of the best little adventure games that I've played. Everything is nearing perfection or is perfect. Go for it!
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
9.0 hrs on record
Posted: April 15
The Last Door is a point and click adventure game that is the amalgamation of influences from many of the giants of weird and horror fiction including Poe, Lovecraft, Chambers, Machen, and Mauppasant. It's a fascinating and intriguing story mixed with very fun point and click mechanics, and one of the most atmospheric and engaging point and click games I've played. The pixel graphics are very effective for suggesting a simple and pleasing Victorian tone while creating a distant feeling of ambiguous disconnect which, when combined with the incredible soundtrack, heightens the sense of tension and unknown. Each of the settings in the game work extremely well as the structure on which to hang the atmosphere and mystery.

There are four episodes, as well as four 'extra' episodes that can be played upon completion of the game. Each of the episodes can be completed in about an hour or so, depending on the player's ability to solve the puzzles which can occasionally prove strangely challenging (in the one or two instances where the solutions feel contrived). Thankfully this only happens once or twice, and the territory to cover by the player isn't that large so exploration isn't too much of a problem. The four post-game, mini-episodes serve to heighten the story and take only a few minutes to complete. The real draw here, far beyond the gameplay, is the well-written story. The first half of The Last Door satisfies the weird fiction fan in me very well, and it promises to deliver in season 2. During my second playthrough I took notes on each of the four chapters to really dig into the story and I was rewarded by the layers of intrigue the writers have included, especially with the four mini-episodes. It's worth specifically mentioning the music, again, as it really does take a game that would be good, and makes it great. The subtle piano and string mixture brings the Victorian era to life.

The only negative, as suggested above, and this is a far too oft seen trait in point and click games, are the sometimes extremely contrived item uses in order to solve puzzles. It rings hollow when you are required to utilize an item in an extremely odd way that even the character in the game may consider with raised eyebrows.

With that said, The Last Door is one of my favorite Steam games, and one of the most true spirited games based on the weird fiction genre that I've played. Highly recommended for those who enjoy point and clicks as well as weird fiction - this will be one of your favorites. I enjoyed it enough to play it through a second time to prepare for the full release of the second season and have hopeful expectations that the story will have a thrilling and suitably weird fiction style ending.
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2 of 4 people (50%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
6.2 hrs on record
Posted: April 2
The horryfing game with an interesting story.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.1 hrs on record
Posted: March 7
worth melting for
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Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 180 days
23 of 32 people (72%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
7.5 hrs on record
Posted: December 25, 2015
A Masterpiece of Darkness, and it seems to be a masterpiece from another world. When you play this game you think you are reading H.P. Lovecraft. It's not a copy of something. No it's unique, minimalistic and you can't stop playing. The music fits absolutely perfect it creates a beautiful but also strange and dangerous atmosphere. Dive into the story of the last door, but be careful there is no coming back...

Outstanding 10/10
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7 of 8 people (88%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.1 hrs on record
Posted: February 9
In short, this is an absolute gem of a game and proof positive that you don't need fancy graphics to build an immersive, disturbing atmosphere.

Pros
+ Amazing soundtrack and in particular, stellar use of sound to evoke feelings/build tension
+ Great Poe/Lovecraft inspired story, and the story-telling is superb
+ Innovative use of interactive cut scenes to drive the story forwards and force you to do gruesome things you're not going to want to
+ Works well, didn't encounter any bugs, and the UI is simple and not at all clunky
+ Definitely leaves you wanting more
+ Great length for the price
+ Some creative puzzles, although on the most part they're relatively simple/not too frustrating

Cons
- Cheaper to buy the standard
- No voice acting.
-achievements are brokin. Unlocked all of them at the same time
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5 of 7 people (71%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 27, 2015
This game is amazing. At first, I was concerned that the pixel style would irritate my eyes but honestly, very quickly you forget it is like that. The story is dark and amazing. The puzzles are straight forward but still great. I have instantly bought the second Chapter and I am downloading it now. Get and enjoy this game. Likened to Cat Lady, in my eyes.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.9 hrs on record
Posted: January 25
Sure, you can play these games for free at various locations throughout the interwebs, but if you have a few dollars to spare it's definitely worth tipping this developers. They've made pixels legitimately eerie and creepy, a nice sturdy mythos to sit on, and have not only closed captions for those of us who struggle with hearing but dyslexia friendly fonts. Bless these developers. May they get lots of treats this valentine's day.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 19
To quote Penny Arcade: "A love letter to H. P. Lovecraft"... and to E. A. Poe. A little pearl I'm honored to have in my games library.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 10
A slow-burn horror mystery. This is better than any horror I have read or watched. This is unquestioningly a fantastic work of art. The sound design is amazing. The graphical style is simple but beautiful. The writing is convincing and, at times, profound. The puzzle elements are not too obscure. Even if you don't like point and click puzzles, I'd still recommend playing this with a guide to experience the story.
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.0 hrs on record
Posted: February 5
I grew up with pixel games like space quest ect which is deemed inferior graphically speaking.
So I was kind of skeptical about this game.
But wow did the game surprise me!
With limited graphics, good story and excellent sound/music this game manages to create believable scary and melancholy atmosphere that keeps you hooked and makes you jump in fear at certain stages. THis is also due to a lot left for the imagination due to less detailed art.
Also due to the blocky-ness of the art, pixel hunting is largely eliminated.

Thoroughly recommend if you are a adventure game lover!
Cant wait to play season 2.

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3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
Recommended
8.2 hrs on record
Posted: January 19
The Last Door is an anthology style point and click adventure and the official adaption of R.L. Stein's popular children's horror fiction series Goosebumps. A first for Steam. Each episode takes you through the best Goosebump titles including Welcome to Dead House, The Haunted Mask and The Night of the Living Dummy. The Collector's Edition includes a introduction to each episode by popular literary hack, Stephen King. A treat for horror aficionados everywhere.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.6 hrs on record
Posted: December 15, 2015
9/10

+ Delicious suspense.
+ Fresh writing.
+ Gripping story + storytelling.
+ Fantastic cliffhangers.
+ Unexpected characters.
+ Phenomenal soundtrack.
+ Devilish scares.
+ Gorgeous pixel-art.
+ Ominously creepy.
+ Frequent auto-saves. (My game crashed a couple times and never lost any progress.)

-Sometimes character moves too slowly.
-Occasional un-intuitive puzzles.

9/10
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: January 14
Dealing with macabre and mystery, thematically The Last Door is heavy with influences of Edgar Allan Poe. As protagonist devotes himself to his desire to remember, "The Raven" from the narrative poem by American writer makes an appearance, rhyming motifs of the game and the famous piece of literature.
During the course of the story the theme of forbidden knowledge, which is common to another writer of horror fiction - Howard Phillips Lovecraft, becomes not only apparent but also takes a leading role as it fuels protagonist's search for answers. But overall the main tone of the story is more of a gothic fiction than Lovecraftian horror.
However, it is nothing but sad that despite excellent writing oozing with atmosphere visually The Last Door is just too lo-fi. There's absolutely no reason for the game to be reminiscent of the early Sierra's AGI engine games if it doesn't bring scene to life or help to identify interactive spots on the screen. And with game's visual presentation being locked at 4:3 aspect ratio it looks like an unnecessary gimmick.
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