Gnomoria is a sandbox village management game where you help lead a small group of gnomes, who have set out on their own, to thrive into a bustling kingdom! Anything you see can be broken down and rebuilt elsewhere.
User reviews:
Recent:
Mixed (45 reviews) - 48% of the 45 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (2,542 reviews) - 87% of the 2,542 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Feb 23, 2016

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Recent updates View all (48)

February 23

Gnomoria v1.0 released!

This release marks Gnomoria's transition out of Early Access! This update adds a ton of quality of life changes, additional support for mod developers, a debug mode for testing and spawning items and gnomes, optimizations and tons of bug fixes.

Check out the full patch notes here.

49 comments Read more

Reviews

“it's easy to get lost in designing the perfect little base for your gnomes”
Kotaku

“insanely fun, and highly addictive, village management game”
Destructoid

“the satisfaction you feel for establishing your civilization is overwhelming. Basically, the more you put into Gnomoria, the more you get from it”
Pixel Perfect Gaming

About This Game

Gnomoria is a sandbox village management game where you help lead a small group of gnomes, who have set out on their own, to thrive into a bustling kingdom! Anything you see can be broken down and rebuilt elsewhere. Craft items, build structures, set traps and dig deep underground in search of precious resources to help your gnomes survive the harsh lands. Build your kingdom and stockpile wealth to attract wandering gnomads to your cause, but be wary of also attracting enemies!

Key Features:

  • Procedurally generated world - Every game is different
  • Fully destructible environment - Everything can be mined, dug, chopped and rebuilt or used for crafting
  • Open sandbox gameplay - Play how you want - manage a peaceful town or build up military and fend off invasions.
  • Crafting - Tons of items to craft at different workshops
  • Mechanisms - Construct elaborate contraptions using parts like hatches, levers, steam engines

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP, Vista or Windows 7
    • Processor:2.0 Ghz
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space
    Minimum:
    • OS:10.7.5
    • Processor:2.0 Ghz
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • Graphics:OpenGL 3.0+ (2.1 with ARB extensions acceptable)
    • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space
    Minimum:
    • OS:glibc 2.15+, 32/64-bit. S3TC support is NOT required.
    • Processor:2.0 Ghz
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • Graphics:OpenGL 3.0+ (2.1 with ARB extensions acceptable)
    • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Mixed (45 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (2,542 reviews)
Recently Posted
F41L
( 297.1 hrs on record )
Posted: July 1
This game could be awsome and it is quiet good! But it has many flaws and sadly some which make it sometimes unplayable :(

Positiv:
  • Easy but still kinda complex
  • I love the art style
  • Small mod support (this is very nice as it add lots of different items)
  • You can insult goblins
  • Your Yaks can kill bad things
(With rating 1 - 10 | 10 = worst)
Negativ:
  • 10/10 it's programmed as single core game you notice this heavily when you get attacked by a large horde of Goblins.
    This case is not nice but it's okay to deal with.The real problem appears when it starts to stutter and you have
    absolutely no clue why. This can ruin a whole kingdom and several hours of gametime.
  • 8/10 Altough this game has a lot of fun (for me) and I could play this for thousends of hours it has one big flaw... Bugs...
    As everybody else i just can say this game is probably abandon by the Dev,
    although he said that he still want's to fix bugs after the release and I would love this as it has a lot of little flaws like:
    1. You can check "Avoid fighting" for a squad but if you want to train your gnomes after this they keep running away
      which is a little bit annoying if you want to train new gnomes
    2. The AI for building or mining jobs is bad! When you have multiple build jobs (Walls) it could happen that they shut in
      themselfs
    3. Various small things which don't occur that often
  • 1/10 You cannot ride your pastured animals

When he would fix the stutter problem I would give it a thumb up... but like this... it sometimes just gets unplayable!


Sorry for grammer and other mistakes as english is not my main language!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Audish
( 2.6 hrs on record )
Posted: June 30
Ever heard of a little game called Dwarf Fortress? It cast a long shadow for a one-man ASCII project, but if you could get past the atrocious interface it was a bewilderingly deep fantasy sim. Unique projects like that tend to attract imitators, and that's where we get Gnomoria from. But don't write that off as a bad thing just yet, because there's plenty of room to fiddle with the original formula.

Gnomoria plops you in the middle of the wilderness with a band of eight stubby settlers and a few supplies. From this humble beginning it's up to you to help your little friends find food, shelter, and purpose in life. There are extensive commands to have them effect change in the world around them, including numerous digging options, room designations, workshop placements, and foraging orders. You might notice there are no direct movement or action commands, and that's because everything in this style of sim is treated like an open order. When you mark walls to be tunneled through, one of your gnomes that can mine and has nothing better to do will scoot over and start tunneling for you.

You have further control over the order system by assigning jobs to your petite populace. There are several roles like Woodsman and Miner that can be further customized with granular tasks like "hauling wood" or "stonecarving", giving you full control over the workday. Of course, your gnomes will wander off to find food or drink or catch a nap if their needs persist, but they tend to be diligent enough in their tasks to not cause any headaches.

What WILL cause you headaches is the steep learning curve in Gnomoria. I know all of this sounds simple thus far, but the amount of production systems to come to grips with is staggering. The number of workshops alone is utterly gobsmacking, including professions like bone carving and weaving. Production chains can be frustratingly complex, and the best example of this is making a single bed. A bed is made from a frame and a mattress at a carpentry workshop. The frame is made from planks cut at the sawmill from logs felled outside. The mattress is made from cloth woven by your tailor, using cotton grown on a farm and a bone needle from your bone carver obtained by slaughtering animals. Thus to make a single bed, you need four different workshops processing goods from forests, farms, and livestock.

There are helpful tooltips that will explain where to get component materials, at least, and if you have all the workshops set up then materials will be auto-queued when ordering a finished product. Little quality of life features like this help make Gnomoria easier to come to grips with, but it's still very much a game that requires a wiki. A tutorial walking you through the foundations of production would be a godsend, and it's a shame that will likely never happen.

You'll run into other difficulties like trying to dig stairs and ramps in the chunky isometric interface, or rooms not functioning and not really getting any feedback why. However, I maintain that there's enough charm and variety to keep you pushing through the rough spots. You are given impressive reign to tunnel and build as you see fit, and sprawling underground kingdoms are not out of the question. It never quite reaches the bar set by Dwarf Fortress, as you don't have a wider world to explore past your immediate map and your gnomes don't have the psychotically detailed personalities of DF inhabitants, but the accessibility goes a long way towards balancing that out. Gnomoria makes a great entry point for this particular brand of ultra-detailed sim, with enough features and polish to keep you digging for hours.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
viraptor
( 19.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 28
Everyone else already mentioned how buggy the game is. Here are some fun screenshots to go with them:
"We can't possibly go up the slope to build the wall - let's just stay below and starve to death instead!" https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=675591192
"I spent the whole day chopping wood while injured. Thanks for building the hospital, now I can lay in bed and starve to death because nobody is assigned to care of me" https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=675590886
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Willkjj
( 49.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 28
Awesome Game! I wish there was a good tutoril for it but its still awesome!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Urist
( 11.7 hrs on record )
Posted: June 28
This game and the reviews for it originally drove me to Dwarf Fortress, a game that I immediately fell in love with and have continued to play for years while Gnomoria remained shunted to the side. If I never read this games reviews I would have never played the greatest game in the world so thank you devs.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
sirseptin
( 147.9 hrs on record )
Pre-Release Review
Posted: June 27
Gnomoria is a fantastic managment and sandboxy game that lets you decide exactly what you want and how you will get there. Called dwarf fortress-lite by some I can see it but that is a good thing to me. The UI is SO much better than Dwarf fortress in every single way. I also feel not having things like exactly modeling of every detail of your gnomes pysche is not a negative. I like dwarf fortress but the excessive detail it to much very often.

You can make it as easy or hard as you like with monsters and how much ore the map contains and how far down it is beneath the earth. Decide if you want no monsters or have a army every time they show up. For the money you can easily lose yourself for hundreds of hours in this game. I wish I had the time to play it more, nothing like starting a awesome little kingdom and watching it grow to 20-30 gnomes strong or more. Some Quality of Life things that coud be fixed but sadly the Dev now has to do other things to make a living.

Summary, an excellent game well worth the money asked for it but it is as it is and unlikey to get more patches.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
stephen.wraith
( 13.4 hrs on record )
Posted: June 27
I like the game, and I've played it a lot, but I don't know how to open up the dev console. Can anyone help?
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Hemperor Jasjr
( 105.6 hrs on record )
Posted: June 27
Great game even after release. Not sure about the bugs people are talking about. I feel like its a good finished game and has opened up for the modder to add more to it. If you have been wanting to play Dwarf Fortress (DF) but its way to complex for you? Then I would recomend this game. I feel like i have gotten my moneys worth out of this game and then some. Yes there is no tutorial really in the game but it is not hard to learn at all. And there are many tutorials on Youtube on how to play. So if you are looking for a fun DF stile game, this is one of the best out there. Besides play DF its self.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
RunicToxicJoker
( 5.3 hrs on record )
Posted: June 26
Devs ditched it rip - go play dwarf fortress.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Arty
( 3.2 hrs on record )
Pre-Release Review
Posted: June 26
Did you really have to do the same thing that Towns' devs have done?
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
187 of 224 people (83%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Not Recommended
111.6 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: June 3
The games been abandoned, the final release is buggy and the website has been down for weeks. DO NOT BUY THIS!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
114 of 139 people (82%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
356.9 hrs on record
Posted: June 6
The Game has been Abandoned

  • Game breaking bugs
  • No instructions
  • Bad controls
  • Basic features missing after "release"

I really wanted this game to work, I put a lot of hours into it hoping it would turn out great, now it's been released with none of the major bugs fixed. Wheelbarrows don't work, gnomes will pass an unused wheelbarrow hundreds of times that I carefully placed between the Item they're picking up and the stockpile they're taking it to. Goblins can't find the door to my settlement so they bring tunnelers, this would be more of a problem, but they can't seem to find the tunnels they dig either. When goblins can get in you're screwed, soldiers won't pick up or wear armor even though I told them to retreat to get armor, gnomes like to attack one at a time and fan out instead of all attacking the same target like I selected. Production will stop waiting for applewood logs, despite specifically telling the workshop to build it with pine boards instead of applewood boards, my sawmills are set to only make pine boards because I don't have apple logs; but the game has decided it wants applewood so I have to delete and re-enter my instructions and hope. Workshop build queues are a suggestion instead of a rule, it doesn't matter that I have sticks and coal and have torches on the top of the queue, the workshop decided now was the time to make a barrel out of applewood because the last thing in my queue was pint barrels.

There are zero instructions within the game. You have to go to a wiki that's security certificate has been expired for three months. Then the info there is often out of date. The guides on the internet by other players are all old from non-relevant versions of the game.

You can navigate three menus deep or use a shortcut to the exact thing you want. If you're in the build menu you can't go to the mining menu, you have to go all the way out and then all the way back in. You can setup hotkeys for things like "mine wall" or "dig ramp down", but if you want to "dig hole" or "dig ramp up" or "dig stairs down" you would have to have a separate hotkey for each of those commands. You can't go to the dig up commands or the dig down commands you have to go through the hole menu again. There are three dig up commands and three dig down commands, but these are on different menu bars despite there being enough space on one bar. You can't mine more than one level at a time, if you want to make a mine shaft 10 layers down, you have to manually dig on each layer and hope they line up, otherwise a section of your shaft is now one square off. You should be able to click and drag on more than one layer.

You can't copy professions or their task priority, if I want to make a mason that's exactly like a miner except he does workshop tasks before mining you have to re-make the entire profession from scratch and hope you get it right. You can make a new profession in the character menu, but then you can't give that new named profession to anyone else, you would have to re-created it in the correct profession menu.

The game is out, but we still need immigrant gnomes, no new gnomes can be made in your kingdom you just have to hope you get enough new gnomes to cover from your last goblin attack. No baby gnomes. No copy and paste, Gnomes still ignore dirt piles while putting seeds in my stockpiles to just let dirt golems spawn. The problem isn't just that you don't have any control, but that the game gives you options to imply the illusion on some kind of control. I know you can't control the Gnomes directly but I said to pick up dirt piles and ignore those seeds!!!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
56 of 73 people (77%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
151.1 hrs on record
Posted: June 6
Extremely buggy. Worse than it's ever been.

Gnomes regularly fail to path right and starve to death. Gnomes regularly fail to path right and get stuck doing nothing. Pathing in general is atrocious. Gnome AI for stocking items is horrible, they will travel 200 tiles distance to grab a single item, take it 200 tiles to stock it, and repeat, when theres dozens of wheelburrows, buckets, and sacks laying around.

The game is playable... up until you get some bug seriously ♥♥♥♥ing you over. And it can ♥♥♥♥ you over massively. Akin to wasting real life days worth of played time. The only way to manage avoiding this is manually going into the save files to make backups because the game wont let you do it from the menu's.

There are a ton of other flaws, but I can't really complain about those. Their cosmetic. I could accept the cosmetic / UI issues if the base game itself would at least ♥♥♥♥ing play right, but alas, it doesn't.

TL;DR A potentially great game ruined by cripplingly damaging bugs.

RIP Gnomoria.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
28 of 42 people (67%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Not Recommended
28.6 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: June 18
Apparently abandoned. Turns out learning Dwarf Fortress is far more worthwhile.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
31 of 48 people (65%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
9.4 hrs on record
Posted: June 3
Gnomoria does little to hide its inspiration. It's an attempt at a more accessible version of the legendarily complex Dwarf Fortress. If you've been following my reviews, you probably know that I place a fair amount of value on accessibility. Adding cute graphics and a, if not modern, at least mouse controlled interface are things I'm very much in favor of.

Unfortunately, the similarly stripped-down complexity ends up losing the unique charm of its inspiration, without actually making the game friendly to those not initiated in the Dorfish ways. Like Dwarf Fortress, Gnomoria is a game about systems and trying to keep them in equilibrium. Unlike Dwarf Fortress, it has systems simple enough to solve.

That wouldn't necessarily be a problem if Gnomoria's design moved further afield. But it retains the one save per world and glacial pace. As something to set running in the background and check in on intermittently, it can bring you some entertainment. But it's too slow and too punitive, for too few interesting decisions, to pour the kind of time into that it expects.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
34 of 54 people (63%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
149.6 hrs on record
Pre-Release Review
Posted: June 12
I did love this game, but it was left unfinished and abandoned.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
17 of 27 people (63%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
390.9 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
Changing my review to a negative one since the developer decided to abandon this game and delete the dev roadmap after making it moddable.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
19 of 33 people (58%) found this review helpful
Recommended
146.6 hrs on record
Posted: June 15
Wow, so much hate since the 1.0 release.

Yes, the game is probably done with development. There is no promise of future updates. However, the game is playable and many major features were added to the game. Most of the bugs have been fixed, so I'm not sure what the others are talking about.

There are annoying quirks with pathing, gnome behavior, and interface issues. My biggest hope is that we get a 1.1 that actually fixes many of the issues. Better yet, open source it! The features that were "promised" on the road map were pie in the sky brainstorming by the developer. He should never have posted it.

I just don't understand how someone can give a negative review, but have over 100 hours in a game they most likely bought on sale for $5 or less.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
2.6 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
Ever heard of a little game called Dwarf Fortress? It cast a long shadow for a one-man ASCII project, but if you could get past the atrocious interface it was a bewilderingly deep fantasy sim. Unique projects like that tend to attract imitators, and that's where we get Gnomoria from. But don't write that off as a bad thing just yet, because there's plenty of room to fiddle with the original formula.

Gnomoria plops you in the middle of the wilderness with a band of eight stubby settlers and a few supplies. From this humble beginning it's up to you to help your little friends find food, shelter, and purpose in life. There are extensive commands to have them effect change in the world around them, including numerous digging options, room designations, workshop placements, and foraging orders. You might notice there are no direct movement or action commands, and that's because everything in this style of sim is treated like an open order. When you mark walls to be tunneled through, one of your gnomes that can mine and has nothing better to do will scoot over and start tunneling for you.

You have further control over the order system by assigning jobs to your petite populace. There are several roles like Woodsman and Miner that can be further customized with granular tasks like "hauling wood" or "stonecarving", giving you full control over the workday. Of course, your gnomes will wander off to find food or drink or catch a nap if their needs persist, but they tend to be diligent enough in their tasks to not cause any headaches.

What WILL cause you headaches is the steep learning curve in Gnomoria. I know all of this sounds simple thus far, but the amount of production systems to come to grips with is staggering. The number of workshops alone is utterly gobsmacking, including professions like bone carving and weaving. Production chains can be frustratingly complex, and the best example of this is making a single bed. A bed is made from a frame and a mattress at a carpentry workshop. The frame is made from planks cut at the sawmill from logs felled outside. The mattress is made from cloth woven by your tailor, using cotton grown on a farm and a bone needle from your bone carver obtained by slaughtering animals. Thus to make a single bed, you need four different workshops processing goods from forests, farms, and livestock.

There are helpful tooltips that will explain where to get component materials, at least, and if you have all the workshops set up then materials will be auto-queued when ordering a finished product. Little quality of life features like this help make Gnomoria easier to come to grips with, but it's still very much a game that requires a wiki. A tutorial walking you through the foundations of production would be a godsend, and it's a shame that will likely never happen.

You'll run into other difficulties like trying to dig stairs and ramps in the chunky isometric interface, or rooms not functioning and not really getting any feedback why. However, I maintain that there's enough charm and variety to keep you pushing through the rough spots. You are given impressive reign to tunnel and build as you see fit, and sprawling underground kingdoms are not out of the question. It never quite reaches the bar set by Dwarf Fortress, as you don't have a wider world to explore past your immediate map and your gnomes don't have the psychotically detailed personalities of DF inhabitants, but the accessibility goes a long way towards balancing that out. Gnomoria makes a great entry point for this particular brand of ultra-detailed sim, with enough features and polish to keep you digging for hours.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
7 of 11 people (64%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
513.9 hrs on record
Posted: June 18
Development is pretty slow but the game is good.
Has Linux support which is great and overall is a nice timesink.
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