This content requires the base game Unity of Command: Stalingrad Campaign on Steam in order to play.

User reviews:
Overall:
Positive (7 reviews) - 85% of the 7 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Dec 10, 2012

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Downloadable Content

This content requires the base game Unity of Command: Stalingrad Campaign on Steam in order to play.

Buy Unity of Command - Red Turn DLC

Packages that include this game

Buy Unity of Command Trilogy Bundle

Includes 3 items: Unity of Command - Black Turn DLC, Unity of Command - Red Turn DLC, Unity of Command: Stalingrad Campaign

 

About This Content

Dying days of the Stalingrad Campaign saw the Wehrmacht reeling under heavy blows. The battle of Kursk will now see them pursue an offensive agenda for one last time. Soon after, as the strategic initiative swings in favor of the Soviets, you are tasked with liberating the motherland in command of victorious Red Army forces.

Key Features


  • Gigantic Soviet campaign featuring 17 scenarios
  • Two standalone Axis scenarios including Zitadelle, the Battle of Kursk
  • Four dedicated PvP scenarios including the tightly contested Korsun Pocket
  • 39 different types of units modelled, including Panther and T-34/85 armor
  • Heavy-hitting late war specialist steps such as ISU-122 and Tiger II
  • Great for modding, with Unity of Command 1.04 featuring a scenario editor

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP
    • Processor:1.6 GHz
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • Hard Drive:150 MB HD space
    Recommended:
    • Processor:2.0 GHz
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    Minimum:
    • OS:10.6
    • Processor:1.6 GHz
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • Hard Drive:150 MB HD space
    Recommended:
    • Processor:2.0 GHz
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
Customer reviews
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Overall:
Positive (7 reviews)
Recently Posted
The Hagen
Posted: February 20
Great extension for UoC - if you enjoyed the original "Stalingrad Campaign", you will also love this one!
IMO a bit easier than the "Stalingrad Campaign" - at least I managed to achieve more "brilliant victories" than in the "Stalingrad Campaign" scenarios ... ;-)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
pethogergely2009
Posted: February 18
I really like the base game, which is a well-thought-out combination of several ideas:
- German units are individually much stronger than Russian units, but outnumbered by the Russians.
- Supply line and weather are more important factors than enemy units. If just a single very weak enemy unit gets through your lines and interrupts your supply, or if you lead your forces deep into enemy territory without making sure they have adequate supply, you lose even against very outnumbered and week forces.
- In single-player games you always play the attacking side, so you have to conquer map hexes that lie behind the enemy lines at the beginning of a scenario. This means that you constantly have to attack even if this involves losing units. Since units aren't carried over from one scenario to the other (unlike in the Panzer General/Corps games), sacrificing units in order to break through the enemy and advance toward the victory hexes is a must. If you don't attack with units that you know you will lose but that will weaken the enemy so another unit can eventually defeat it, you are unable to meet the turn limit and lose.
- The computer player always tries to exploit weak points in your frontline and break through it, or outflank you, to cut off your supply line. Other than this, the computer player is relatively passive and doesn't attack, which makes perfect sense since it already controls all victory hexes at the beginning of a scenario.
- The turn limits in the base game are set up so that the player constantly has to make progress with the offensive, otherwise even the turn limit for the simple victory is hard to achieve. But there are also two further turn limit levels. Brilliant victory means that all victory hexes must be conquered by the time limit that is specified for each, which is usually very hard to do. Decisive victory is easier, it just means that a slightly stricter turn limit must be met than for "simple" victory. Decisive and brilliant victory are hard to achieve but are often necessary in the base game because they are needed to unlock further scenarios in the campaign. If you don't meet decisive victory conditions in basically every scenario, you don't see much of the campaign. So the game strongly encourages you not simply to win, but to figure out what the weak points of the enemy are (these are basically never obvious) so you can beat them with a decisive or even brilliant victory to be able to play locked scenarios. This is probably what reviewers of the base game mean when the write that Unity of Command is a puzzle game.

This formula is unchanged in the two expansions for the game (this one and the Black Turn expansion), but scenario design at least in this expansion is poor, as if the designer(s) didn't understand what the game is about. Although the Soviets historically beat the crap out of the Germans, so they surely must have been much more powerful, the counterattack agains the Germans can't have been this easy. The Soviet campaign in the base game is quite challenging, which is probably much more realistic. The scenarios in the Red Turn expansion are so easy that it is straightforward to achieve a brilliant victory on the first try in almost every scenario.
The defenses of the enemy are partly weak because even though they start the scenario with entrenched units, the AI is for some reason not happy at all with the initial placement of the units, so it moves them around the front without attacking the player, just to have its units switch places. This makes no sense at all, keeping a unit entrenched is basically always a better defensive strategy than switching it with a unit two hexes away. Apart from not making sense, this always is very annoying since the AI takes ages to reorder its frontline in the first turn of the scenario, moving most of its units around. If the scenario designer(s) had simply placed the units in a way that the AI is more or less happy with, this would have been avoided.

So this is an uninspired and rather boring expansion to a great base game. It is very easy to beat and consequently offers next to no replay value. The Black Turn expansion, while still not nearly as good as the base game and offering few incentives to replay scenarios, is much more challenging and interesting than this one.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Njordz
Posted: May 28, 2015
Very good expansion!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Sensei Obscurion
Posted: February 5, 2015
finally a game where you can play with germans and the russians.
easy to understand but still some thinkwork is involved in it.
very playerfreindly and enjoyable.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Tweedledumb
Posted: December 30, 2014
Great expansion for the great base game.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
5 of 7 people (71%) found this review helpful
Recommended
Posted: February 5, 2015
finally a game where you can play with germans and the russians.
easy to understand but still some thinkwork is involved in it.
very playerfreindly and enjoyable.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
Posted: February 20
Great extension for UoC - if you enjoyed the original "Stalingrad Campaign", you will also love this one!
IMO a bit easier than the "Stalingrad Campaign" - at least I managed to achieve more "brilliant victories" than in the "Stalingrad Campaign" scenarios ... ;-)
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
Recommended
Posted: May 28, 2015
Very good expansion!
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4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
Recommended
Posted: December 30, 2014
Great expansion for the great base game.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
Posted: February 18
I really like the base game, which is a well-thought-out combination of several ideas:
- German units are individually much stronger than Russian units, but outnumbered by the Russians.
- Supply line and weather are more important factors than enemy units. If just a single very weak enemy unit gets through your lines and interrupts your supply, or if you lead your forces deep into enemy territory without making sure they have adequate supply, you lose even against very outnumbered and week forces.
- In single-player games you always play the attacking side, so you have to conquer map hexes that lie behind the enemy lines at the beginning of a scenario. This means that you constantly have to attack even if this involves losing units. Since units aren't carried over from one scenario to the other (unlike in the Panzer General/Corps games), sacrificing units in order to break through the enemy and advance toward the victory hexes is a must. If you don't attack with units that you know you will lose but that will weaken the enemy so another unit can eventually defeat it, you are unable to meet the turn limit and lose.
- The computer player always tries to exploit weak points in your frontline and break through it, or outflank you, to cut off your supply line. Other than this, the computer player is relatively passive and doesn't attack, which makes perfect sense since it already controls all victory hexes at the beginning of a scenario.
- The turn limits in the base game are set up so that the player constantly has to make progress with the offensive, otherwise even the turn limit for the simple victory is hard to achieve. But there are also two further turn limit levels. Brilliant victory means that all victory hexes must be conquered by the time limit that is specified for each, which is usually very hard to do. Decisive victory is easier, it just means that a slightly stricter turn limit must be met than for "simple" victory. Decisive and brilliant victory are hard to achieve but are often necessary in the base game because they are needed to unlock further scenarios in the campaign. If you don't meet decisive victory conditions in basically every scenario, you don't see much of the campaign. So the game strongly encourages you not simply to win, but to figure out what the weak points of the enemy are (these are basically never obvious) so you can beat them with a decisive or even brilliant victory to be able to play locked scenarios. This is probably what reviewers of the base game mean when the write that Unity of Command is a puzzle game.

This formula is unchanged in the two expansions for the game (this one and the Black Turn expansion), but scenario design at least in this expansion is poor, as if the designer(s) didn't understand what the game is about. Although the Soviets historically beat the crap out of the Germans, so they surely must have been much more powerful, the counterattack agains the Germans can't have been this easy. The Soviet campaign in the base game is quite challenging, which is probably much more realistic. The scenarios in the Red Turn expansion are so easy that it is straightforward to achieve a brilliant victory on the first try in almost every scenario.
The defenses of the enemy are partly weak because even though they start the scenario with entrenched units, the AI is for some reason not happy at all with the initial placement of the units, so it moves them around the front without attacking the player, just to have its units switch places. This makes no sense at all, keeping a unit entrenched is basically always a better defensive strategy than switching it with a unit two hexes away. Apart from not making sense, this always is very annoying since the AI takes ages to reorder its frontline in the first turn of the scenario, moving most of its units around. If the scenario designer(s) had simply placed the units in a way that the AI is more or less happy with, this would have been avoided.

So this is an uninspired and rather boring expansion to a great base game. It is very easy to beat and consequently offers next to no replay value. The Black Turn expansion, while still not nearly as good as the base game and offering few incentives to replay scenarios, is much more challenging and interesting than this one.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny