Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (John Walker)

The grim tale of Godus‘s development seems to have gotten a lot grimmer. Lead developer Konrad Naszynski’s contract expired shortly after the release of Godus Wars and wasn’t renewed, 22cans confirm, and a source tells us there’s no one left working on the game.

… [visit site to read more]

Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (John Walker)

Godus Wars [official site], the second unfinished Godus game from development team 22Cans, costs 11 on Steam. And until a few moments ago, once you’d battled through the first continent of its combat-focused spin-off, to play any more of the game cost another $5. Yup, this new “free to owners of Godus” early access, severely unfinished game included surprise premium in-game purchases! Unsurprisingly, on discovering this, already angry players became even angrier, and let their feelings be known. A taken-aback 22Cans have just announced they’re removing this charge, while expressing astonishment that anyone should have minded it.

… [visit site to read more]

Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alice O'Connor)

As if one unfinished Godus game weren’t enough, Peter Molyneux’s studio 22cans have launched another. Godus Wars arrived [official site] is out on Steam Early Access today. It appears to be a combat-oriented spin-off with the fighty improvements that 22cans had billed as coming to the original Godus. Folks who bought or backed Godus get Godus Wars free, and it even comes with Godus thrown in, but I’m still not really sure why it’s a separate game.

… [visit site to read more]

Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


When is combat coming out?

Right now! With the release of Godus Wars, combat finally makes it’s full introduction into the Godus universe. Peter has always considered Godus being two games: one tranquil, peaceful and the other war-like with bloody battles taking place across the unique lands.

Have you abandoned Godus?!

Not at all! The release of Wars proves that we are still dedicated to Godus and everyone who owns or has previously purchased Godus, already has Godus Wars! Yes! Godus Wars is free for all previous Godus Kickstarter backers & owners.

How many people have been working on Godus and what are their roles?

11 people have worked on Godus Wars.

  • Peter and Konrad - Design
  • Dimitri, Gary, Ryan & Richard - Programming
  • Annah - Art
  • Ian - Audio
  • Anthony & Turner - Production
  • Martin - QA
  • Tony - GUI


What about the winner of Curiosity - Bryan Henderson?!

Bryan is featured in Godus Wars! He can be seen as an opposing deity on one of the continents.

Why Early Access?

We’re using Early Access to gather balancing feedback and gauge player reaction as we work towards a feature complete release.

Early Access will allow our users and loyal Kickstarter backers to try out and provide detailed feedback in order for us to deliver a more polished, optimised and balanced game upon release!

The release of Wars demonstrates that we are still dedicated to Godus.

Everyone who owns or has previously purchased Godus, already has Godus Wars! Yes! Godus Wars is free for all previous Godus Kickstarter backers & owners - It should auto-magically appear in your steam library, if it doesnt please let us know!


What's the plan with the Godus backer rewards at this point? When will people be receiving those?

We're continuing to work through the release of the Kickstarter backer rewards. The Art of Godus backer book was sent out to the appropriate tiers last year and the Early Access launch of Godus Wars brings with it a large collection of Godus design documents and Documentary has been completed.

What will you do with Godus Wars feedback?
We will be collecting all detailed and relevant feedback posted and while we won't be replying to all posts individually, we will be reading everything. Be sure to keep an eye on the Announcements board for Feedback updates!

What is happening to this page now that Godus Wars is out?

Now that Godus Wars & Godus are both available as one package, we will be closing the Godus Store page and removing the higher price from sale. The discussion boards will be left untouched.
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


This week we’re very happy to announce that the team has been making some good progress in regards to the combat gameplay! As you may already know, we’ve recently spent some time tuning and fixing the Warbands pathfinding. We have now reached a very good result that we want to playtest before continuing working on this. That’s why recently we moved onto a new exciting feature: Combat God Powers.

In combat, God Powers will help you change the course of the battle. You will be able to set your enemies on fire, slow them down or give your troops a bonus to maximise your chance of victory!

This novelty in how powers are used in Godus is also presented to players with a new UI visualisation. The power cards are looking more aggressive to better convey the combat theme.

Annah has been working on this for the past few days and we’re happy to show some of the new visuals today.

Rain of Purity is a power you probably already know. You’ll be able to use it in combat and its card now looks more beautiful than ever:



Another cool new power is Military Settlements. It will allow you to build a special type of structure necessary to create Warbands. Here’s how it looks:



A bunch of new exciting powers and visual improvements are part of the combat update and we will begin showing them to you very shortly.


Let us know what you think!

The Godus Team
22cans
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


"This week we are going to step back a little and take a closer look at our vision of how we see players using Warbands."

"The ever shifting terrain and the verticality provide by the many land layers makes Godus a unique landscape for battle. We really want to play on these features to provide an experience that is very different from what players might expect from a RTS title."

"Directing troops and exploiting the landscape (and even altering on the fly) in any meaningful way proved to be a very challenging feat of multi-tasking once more than half a dozen units were on the field. The decision of using Warbands grew out the desire to retain a sense of scale to conflicts without forcing the player to manually control large numbers of individual soldiers."




"We really want to encourage smart and tactical gameplay, where players are rewarded for paying careful attention to the actions of individual Warbands.To this end we have reinforced the effects of the landscape on the performance of the soldiers. Height advantage and tree cover for example have a powerful effect on the outcome of battle. Players able to exploit the landscape with clever positioning of their Warbands will have the upper hand even over far superior numbers."

"Players will also notice that veteran Warbands will become stronger (potentially a LOT stronger). The goal is to encourage and reward players to use and preserve their soldiers carefully rather than seeing them as completely disposable. We are currently experimenting with how to make these veterans visually distinct on the battlefield to reinforce their status as elite units."


Here's a a couple of new screenshots of a recent Combat build showing off some of the new military props around Settlements.

Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


"This week has seen the start of some upgrades to the movement arrow system. Up to this point we’ve been using the movement indicators from the leashing system. While those indicators are fine for moving followers about in Homeworld, they didn’t reflect troop movements accurately enough for our liking. You can see the problem below:"




"The first thing we did was take not normally seen debug navigation pathing lines which look something like this."




"And use them as a basis to draw the movement arrows to make them look like this:"




'There is some work still to be done to produce smoother, more visually appealing arrows, but they now accurately reflect navigation."

"The current leash arrow drawing system also wasn’t really designed to handle drawing and tracking movement arrows for multiple units. We polished up the system to only display movement arrows for currently selected Warbands and be able to wipe and redraw the arrows at any time."




"What’s left now is some smoothing and visual polish of the arrows. We’ve implemented a system to allow us quickly and easily replace the textures used to draw the arrows themselves and playing around with different looks have produced some rather fun results."




Also - Check out Annah's 3D printed Archer!

Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Over the coming weeks, Konrad will take us through a range of different topics as we continue progressing with Combat. First up is one of the more annoying problems the team has faced recently - a memory issue that has been causing any build to crash quickly after launching.


Konrad - Design

"Godus has seen a great many changes to its code base in the last few months. As we were expecting, at some point this would mean trouble. Recently this really caught up to us - builds were becoming so unstable that it was time to roll our sleeves up and do some serious maintenance. Just imagine how annoying it has been trying to develop game that crashes every few minutes! Unfortunately the root of many of these issues have proved to be very difficult to track down, the debugging tools we've been using so far insufficient. Richard has been tracking down and dealing with it"


Richard - Programming

"The first step towards solving memory issues of this sort is to hook up some powerful diagnostic tools. As with any game codebase, Godus is far too big and complicated for us to go through by hand finding these issues - it would take years! Instead, the tools have given us a load of data pointing towards potential issues. Lately, I've spent time sifting through this and fixing issues where necessary. We're starting to get the benefit from this as we uncover more issues, but there's still more work to be done to get to a point where we're happy with the game's stability."




Konrad - Design

"So what does this mean for Godus? Well, it's but a mere setback of course! These kinds of challenges are part and parcel of game development. We've been hard at work creating a special build of Godus to run on a specialised debugging and memory logging machine which will provide us with highly detailed data allowing us to identify the source the instabilities. While it has meant we've had to divert a significant portion of Richard's time from the development of features, it will ultimately mean a far more stable and robust game going forward."

Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Richard wanted to really go into detail about the problems and obstacles faced with the Mustering Fields implementation in the upcoming combat release.

Mustering Fields

"As Konrad mentioned in our last update, mustering fields are our solution to finding a stable spawning point for troops in the ever-changing world of Godus. In our initial implementation, troops would exit the citadel one-by-one and then get into formation at their spawn point. But how do we find a suitable spawn point?"

"The very nature of Godus makes computational geometry problems very challenging. Citadels are likely to be surrounded by lots of abodes, which means that it's difficult to find a large, empty space close by. As such, I decided to implement an algorithm that's been well-documented in acamedia to solve the largest empty sphere problem (although it's more like largest empty circle in our case, as we're only considering two dimensions)."

"The algorithm involves performing a Delaunay triangulation (computed using the Bowyer-Watson algorithm) – this provides the dual graph of a Voronoi diagram, which we can then use to find candidates for our spawning point. This implementation took me some time to pull together, but it did bring benefits. Over time, however, we started to feel that the algorithm alone couldn't quite bring us the level of robustness we wanted."

"Finding the largest empty space was great, but – again, as per the nature of Godus – it turns out that areas which are prime spaces for spawning warbands also happens to be really attractive to builders looking to set-up their new home. It wasn't uncommon that we'd select a spawn point, only for an abode to be built on it before the troops could get there."

"Another problem was that, in the basic implementation of the algorithm, all obstacles (e.g. abodes, rocks) are considered as infinitely-small points. This is a fine assumption to make when all our obstacles are of roughly the same size. However, when some obstacles are much larger (for example, in the instance of citadels), this becomes highly problematic, as illustrated by the diagram."



"These challenges aren't insurmountable – I could have modified the algortihm to take account of these factors, but whenever we get to the stage that we realise that our existing solution is starting to look inappropriate for the task, we like to sit down and discuss if there's anything else we could do instead."

"Mustering fields seemed to be the answer. The player will still be able to set a rally point for their troops, but if the player elects not to or if that point becomes invalid, we know we've got an area which will always be free of obstacles and able to accommodate a war band."

"We also had some reservations about gameplay issues created by having troops spawn individually – for example, they were very easy to spawn camp if your enemy had a warband nearby."

"The settlement compression has been one of my very favourite aspects of Godus. Procedural stuff really interests me and I always found watching my abodes slide together to create a goliath settlement to be a really satisfying feeling."



"We decided that we wanted mustering fields to be an integral part of this settlement compression. Compared to the normal abodes which participate in settlement compression, the mustering fields have certain properties which mean that a lot of special rules had to be written specifically for them:"
  • Mustering fields can only ever be on the ground floor.
  • They can never have anything above them.
  • They can never be used as the door to the settlement.
  • They must be navigable to warbands.
  • But they must not allow houses to be built on them (the concepts of navigability and eligbility for building are quite closely related).
  • They must never be entirely surrounded by other elements of the settlement.
  • They are not subdividable (other settlement elements, if they're too big to fit, will be broken down into several smaller elements – we can't do this for mustering fields).

"If you're a programmer reading this and you find yourself thinking “But that's easy – I know just how to do all that!”, you need to remember that it's not just a case of writing the functionality, but of making it work well within a very large codebase which represents several years of work and simply wasn't written with mustering fields in mind!"



"As things stand right now, we're getting closer to having a complete implementation and I'm really looking forward to when we're able to provide you with the first build of combat, so you can try it out for yourself."
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Richard wanted to really go into detail about the problems and obstacles faced with the Mustering Fields implementation in the upcoming combat release.

Mustering Fields

"As Konrad mentioned in our last update, mustering fields are our solution to finding a stable spawning point for troops in the ever-changing world of Godus. In our initial implementation, troops would exit the citadel one-by-one and then get into formation at their spawn point. But how do we find a suitable spawn point?"

"The very nature of Godus makes computational geometry problems very challenging. Citadels are likely to be surrounded by lots of abodes, which means that it's difficult to find a large, empty space close by. As such, I decided to implement an algorithm that's been well-documented in acamedia to solve the largest empty sphere problem (although it's more like largest empty circle in our case, as we're only considering two dimensions)."

"The algorithm involves performing a Delaunay triangulation (computed using the Bowyer-Watson algorithm) – this provides the dual graph of a Voronoi diagram, which we can then use to find candidates for our spawning point. This implementation took me some time to pull together, but it did bring benefits. Over time, however, we started to feel that the algorithm alone couldn't quite bring us the level of robustness we wanted."

"Finding the largest empty space was great, but – again, as per the nature of Godus – it turns out that areas which are prime spaces for spawning warbands also happen to really attractive to builders looking to set-up their new home. It wasn't uncommon that we'd select a spawn point, only for an abode to be built on it before the troops could get there."

"Another problem was that, in the basic implementation of the algorithm, all obstacles (e.g. abodes, rocks) are considered as infinitely-small points. This is a fine assumption to make when all our obstacles are of roughly the same size. However, when some obstacles are much larger (for example, in the instance of citadels), this becomes highly problematic, as illustrated by the diagram."



"These challenges aren't insurmountable – I could have modified the algortihm to take account of these factors, but whenever we get to the stage that we realise that our existing solution is starting to look inappropriate for the task, we like to sit down and discuss if there's anything else we could do instead."

"Mustering fields seemed to be the answer. The player will still be able to set a rally point for their troops, but if that player elects not to or if that point becomes invalid, we know we've got an area which will always be free of obstacles and able to accommodate a war band."

"We also had some reservations about gameplay issues created by having troops spawn individually – for example, they were very easy to spawn camp if your enemy had a warband nearby."

"The settlement compression has been one of my very favourite aspects of Godus. Procedural stuff really interests me and I always found watching my abodes slide together to create a goliath settlement to be a really satisfying feeling."



"We decided that we wanted mustering fields to be an integral part of this settlement compression. Compared to the normal abodes which participate in settlement compression, the mustering fields have certain properties which mean that a lot of special rules had to be written specifically for them:"
  • Mustering fields can only ever be on the ground floor.
  • They can never have anything above them.
  • They can never be used as the door to the settlement.
  • They must be navigable to warbands.
  • But they must not allow houses to be built on them (the concepts of navigability and eligbility for building are quite closely related).
  • They must never be entirely surrounded by other elements of the settlement.
  • They are not subdividable (other settlement elements, if they're too big to fit, will be broken down into several smaller elements – we can't do this for mustering fields).

"If you're a programmer reading this and you find yourself thinking “But that's easy – I know just how to do all that!”, you need to remember that it's not just a case of writing the functionality, but of making it work well within a very large codebase which represents several years of work and simply wasn't written with mustering fields in mind!"



"As things stand right now, we're getting closer to having a complete implementation and I'm really looking forward to when we're able to provide you with the first build of combat, so you can try it out for yourself."
...

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