Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Richard wanted to really go into detail about the problems and obstacles faced with the Mustering Fields implementation in the upcoming combat release.

Mustering Fields

"As Konrad mentioned in our last update, mustering fields are our solution to finding a stable spawning point for troops in the ever-changing world of Godus. In our initial implementation, troops would exit the citadel one-by-one and then get into formation at their spawn point. But how do we find a suitable spawn point?"

"The very nature of Godus makes computational geometry problems very challenging. Citadels are likely to be surrounded by lots of abodes, which means that it's difficult to find a large, empty space close by. As such, I decided to implement an algorithm that's been well-documented in acamedia to solve the largest empty sphere problem (although it's more like largest empty circle in our case, as we're only considering two dimensions)."

"The algorithm involves performing a Delaunay triangulation (computed using the Bowyer-Watson algorithm) – this provides the dual graph of a Voronoi diagram, which we can then use to find candidates for our spawning point. This implementation took me some time to pull together, but it did bring benefits. Over time, however, we started to feel that the algorithm alone couldn't quite bring us the level of robustness we wanted."

"Finding the largest empty space was great, but – again, as per the nature of Godus – it turns out that areas which are prime spaces for spawning warbands also happens to be really attractive to builders looking to set-up their new home. It wasn't uncommon that we'd select a spawn point, only for an abode to be built on it before the troops could get there."

"Another problem was that, in the basic implementation of the algorithm, all obstacles (e.g. abodes, rocks) are considered as infinitely-small points. This is a fine assumption to make when all our obstacles are of roughly the same size. However, when some obstacles are much larger (for example, in the instance of citadels), this becomes highly problematic, as illustrated by the diagram."



"These challenges aren't insurmountable – I could have modified the algortihm to take account of these factors, but whenever we get to the stage that we realise that our existing solution is starting to look inappropriate for the task, we like to sit down and discuss if there's anything else we could do instead."

"Mustering fields seemed to be the answer. The player will still be able to set a rally point for their troops, but if the player elects not to or if that point becomes invalid, we know we've got an area which will always be free of obstacles and able to accommodate a war band."

"We also had some reservations about gameplay issues created by having troops spawn individually – for example, they were very easy to spawn camp if your enemy had a warband nearby."

"The settlement compression has been one of my very favourite aspects of Godus. Procedural stuff really interests me and I always found watching my abodes slide together to create a goliath settlement to be a really satisfying feeling."



"We decided that we wanted mustering fields to be an integral part of this settlement compression. Compared to the normal abodes which participate in settlement compression, the mustering fields have certain properties which mean that a lot of special rules had to be written specifically for them:"
  • Mustering fields can only ever be on the ground floor.
  • They can never have anything above them.
  • They can never be used as the door to the settlement.
  • They must be navigable to warbands.
  • But they must not allow houses to be built on them (the concepts of navigability and eligbility for building are quite closely related).
  • They must never be entirely surrounded by other elements of the settlement.
  • They are not subdividable (other settlement elements, if they're too big to fit, will be broken down into several smaller elements – we can't do this for mustering fields).

"If you're a programmer reading this and you find yourself thinking “But that's easy – I know just how to do all that!”, you need to remember that it's not just a case of writing the functionality, but of making it work well within a very large codebase which represents several years of work and simply wasn't written with mustering fields in mind!"



"As things stand right now, we're getting closer to having a complete implementation and I'm really looking forward to when we're able to provide you with the first build of combat, so you can try it out for yourself."
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Richard wanted to really go into detail about the problems and obstacles faced with the Mustering Fields implementation in the upcoming combat release.

Mustering Fields

"As Konrad mentioned in our last update, mustering fields are our solution to finding a stable spawning point for troops in the ever-changing world of Godus. In our initial implementation, troops would exit the citadel one-by-one and then get into formation at their spawn point. But how do we find a suitable spawn point?"

"The very nature of Godus makes computational geometry problems very challenging. Citadels are likely to be surrounded by lots of abodes, which means that it's difficult to find a large, empty space close by. As such, I decided to implement an algorithm that's been well-documented in acamedia to solve the largest empty sphere problem (although it's more like largest empty circle in our case, as we're only considering two dimensions)."

"The algorithm involves performing a Delaunay triangulation (computed using the Bowyer-Watson algorithm) – this provides the dual graph of a Voronoi diagram, which we can then use to find candidates for our spawning point. This implementation took me some time to pull together, but it did bring benefits. Over time, however, we started to feel that the algorithm alone couldn't quite bring us the level of robustness we wanted."

"Finding the largest empty space was great, but – again, as per the nature of Godus – it turns out that areas which are prime spaces for spawning warbands also happen to really attractive to builders looking to set-up their new home. It wasn't uncommon that we'd select a spawn point, only for an abode to be built on it before the troops could get there."

"Another problem was that, in the basic implementation of the algorithm, all obstacles (e.g. abodes, rocks) are considered as infinitely-small points. This is a fine assumption to make when all our obstacles are of roughly the same size. However, when some obstacles are much larger (for example, in the instance of citadels), this becomes highly problematic, as illustrated by the diagram."



"These challenges aren't insurmountable – I could have modified the algortihm to take account of these factors, but whenever we get to the stage that we realise that our existing solution is starting to look inappropriate for the task, we like to sit down and discuss if there's anything else we could do instead."

"Mustering fields seemed to be the answer. The player will still be able to set a rally point for their troops, but if that player elects not to or if that point becomes invalid, we know we've got an area which will always be free of obstacles and able to accommodate a war band."

"We also had some reservations about gameplay issues created by having troops spawn individually – for example, they were very easy to spawn camp if your enemy had a warband nearby."

"The settlement compression has been one of my very favourite aspects of Godus. Procedural stuff really interests me and I always found watching my abodes slide together to create a goliath settlement to be a really satisfying feeling."



"We decided that we wanted mustering fields to be an integral part of this settlement compression. Compared to the normal abodes which participate in settlement compression, the mustering fields have certain properties which mean that a lot of special rules had to be written specifically for them:"
  • Mustering fields can only ever be on the ground floor.
  • They can never have anything above them.
  • They can never be used as the door to the settlement.
  • They must be navigable to warbands.
  • But they must not allow houses to be built on them (the concepts of navigability and eligbility for building are quite closely related).
  • They must never be entirely surrounded by other elements of the settlement.
  • They are not subdividable (other settlement elements, if they're too big to fit, will be broken down into several smaller elements – we can't do this for mustering fields).

"If you're a programmer reading this and you find yourself thinking “But that's easy – I know just how to do all that!”, you need to remember that it's not just a case of writing the functionality, but of making it work well within a very large codebase which represents several years of work and simply wasn't written with mustering fields in mind!"



"As things stand right now, we're getting closer to having a complete implementation and I'm really looking forward to when we're able to provide you with the first build of combat, so you can try it out for yourself."
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Update Time!

This time Anthony (Producer) has a look at one of the bigger challenges the team faced recently with combat development. Annah also showcases a few more bits of art & unit design.

Production - Anthony's Words

"After several months of intensive work, the result we reached with the Warbands pathfinding system is closer than ever to what we envisioned for the game. Let’s look back at the challenges we faced."

"As you already know, we really want to have fluid and responsive Warbands in the game. A pathfinding system already exists in Godus, but we needed to rewrite considerable parts of it to make it compliant with the combat system and our ambitions. "

"For example, we no longer only want your followers to access shrines or new lands to conquer, we want them to be able to reach pretty much any point of the map and react correctly to the sculpting you or the AI might do on the map. One thing we don’t want, is frustrate you because your Warbands did not reach a point, for no real reasons, resulting in a battle loss. Visually speaking, we want them to stay in formation as much as possible to convey a real sense of military discipline. Again, no matter what is happening on the map, you should feel like you’re controlling armies."


"There is still work left to do to reach our objective, but hopefully this gives you an idea about the kind of experience we want to create for you, and we hope you will love it."




Programming - Ryan's Words

Ryan previously mentioned about the AI Pathfinding in a previous update but at that stage the size of the task wasn't quite known.

"The pathfinding system, written by Dimitri, was designed for navigating followers from point A to B as the crow flies. Sometimes this can fail because of sculpting issues or invalid leashing. In Godus, followers adhere to a queue to allow a set amount of followers to move at any one time to increase performance."

"However, with our Combat Warbands, each member must have priority over this system to allow for fluid gameplay and a smooth combat experience. Each warband has it’s own navigation system object that calculates the paths that it is being ordered to move to. Given that Warbands can have many members, the navigation object must be aware of the states of each of its members, where they are in terms of the path laid out for them, if a member has come into any problems and ensuring they stay together along this dynamic world."

"To do this, I have had the assistance of Dimitri who knows the system best, he's worked with me to figure out any edge cases and issues that could arise from this. We have had to do some significant work on this to allow the Warband to be more intuitive when it comes to navigation."

"For example, if a Warband has been told to move to a specific position but that position is in the water, we will travel as close as we can and then cancel the move order and await further instructions or attack anything within our range. We want players to feel like they can safely send a Warband to a position even if its illegal and they’ll try and work something out."




Art & Design - Mustering Fields

We thought it might be a good idea for Annah to show off a little of what she has been working on but before that it's probably best Konrad actually details what Mustering Fields actually are..

"Mustering fields were developed with the aim of solving two distinct problems with the way warbands are generated from citadels. Firstly we needed a stable space for a warband to appear. The ever changing terrain of Godus caused a lot of problems for the navigation system when a spot chosen for a warband to generate became invalid during the process, such as a new abode appearing in their chosen spot. Without it you were never quite sure where a warband would try to get to as it spawned."

"Secondly, having individual soldiers stream out of the citadel as the warband was generating took a long time especially with larger warbands. During this time before the warband got into formation, all the soldiers were vulnerable and could not be commanded. They could all be easily mowed down 1 by 1 by enemy warbands without being able to respond. This problem was especially prominent in large bases where a soldier would have to travel quite far before finding a large enough space to generate their initial formation."

"Having mustering fields part of citadels ensures warbands always have a valid location to form and allows us to generate the entire warband instantly right next to the citadel without it looking like they popped out of thin air en mass."







Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Following on from {LINK REMOVED}last week's update, Godus programmer's Richard & Ryan delve deeper in to the artificial intelligence and warband pathfinding currently being tweaked during the current development sprint and there’s also a round up from Producer Anthony

Commander AI

Richard has found time to go through just what the Commander AI is, in a bit more detail than before.

"Something we haven't talked much about is the “Commander AI” - this is the enemy god, the entity plotting and conniving to bring your fledgling society to its knees. Because of its huge scope, the Commander AI is something we'll be evolving and iterating on quite frequently as we proceed with our combat work. For now, however, let's talk about how the AI will want to start a game."


Commander AI - Before

"Citadels (the new name for military settlements) are key to combat. Having bigger citadels means you can have bigger warbands and more of them, giving you a substantial combat advantage. To make large citadels though, you need a lot of free space. As such, the AI will do its best to quickly clear rocks and trees and flatten land."

"Like you though, the AI has limited belief, so it has has to constantly weigh up whether it's more cost-effective for it to sculpt a piece of land, spending belief now to gain much more belief from any abodes built on it in the long-term. Or if it should instead use that belief on god powers, to try to cripple you in the early game."

"Nothing's as simple as it seems though. Experienced Godus players will be considering a lot of things as they sculpt. Will this sculpt make it easier for enemy warbands to get in attack range of my citadel? Or will it isolate my builders, preventing them from making more abodes? These are the sort of pitfalls that it's really easy for the AI to fall into, particularly in an extremely malleable world such as that of Godus, where the environment can be changed not only by the AI, but by the player as well."


Commander AI - After

"Our ultimate aim is to provide the player with an AI which is highly flexible and capable of providing both an enjoyable experience for new players and challenging & exciting gameplay for Godus veterans, over a long period of time. Getting the AI to this stage has been really enjoyable, so I'm looking forward to having more to tell and show you as we progress."


Pathfinding AI

Programming coder, Ryan spills the beans on the warband pathfinding found within the game.

"Pathfinding already exists in Godus and the followers often find themselves navigating through the world thanks to the pre-existing system. For combat, we’ve had to slightly redesign that system to allow for warbands to move in groups as they navigate across the maps on the player or the enemies command."



"Like a real army, the warbands move in formations by keeping together as they move across the maps and bunching together to traverse obstacles such as rocks, abodes and the terrain. Therefore, players will get an understanding that the warband should be considered one unit but that each of the members of that unit are individual soldiers following a single command."


Anthony's Sprint Review



“This sprint allowed us to fix some critical issues in the warbands pathfinding system. They can now stay in formation most of the time when moving on the map which is clearly the kind of result we wanted to achieve."

"The objective now is to make them move naturally and react dynamically to any change in the map (sculpting or AI actions). As one of the fundamentals actions in Combat, we’ll make sure to spend as much time as necessary on warbands movements: fun is clearly not an option when it comes to this kind of mechanics.”


Next Time

Next time we'll be looking at giving you a unique insight into our next development sprint!

As an added bonus, Annah has updated the combat art we previously released to reflect the progress made on the archer models.

Thanks
22cans



Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Last week we posted {LINK REMOVED}Annah's Combat Art Progress Update and that was well received with fans and the community. This week Konrad has found the time to speak about the design elements of combat.


Early Combat Design

"My original goal was to integrate combat into Homeworld and Weyworld, but after watching groups of soldiers slug it out in Homeworld in an early build of the combat implementation, it became immediately obvious a number of things were very off. Great care had been taken to create a peaceful Zen like atmosphere in Godus. Everything from the pacing, the visuals and the music and sound effect had been tailored towards this goal. And now these bloodthirsty warriors were ruining it all."

Another consideration was when to introduce combat, what role it would play and how. After all, we really want to create engaging wars. The structure and layout of Homeworld simply wasn’t very condusive to introducing combat in a big way. Weyworld was better, but still not ideal and I didn’t want players to have to wait that long to get stuck into battles. Homeworld takes a long time to play through after all. A good solution would be to create a whole new world designed with combat in mind from the ground up allowing us to showcase how this can be more like wars than just combat in the most impactful way while retaining the tranquil gameplay in Homeworld.


Example combat map

So the decision was made to introduce combat in a brand new world. We’ve been experimenting with world size and pacing and right now we’re finding combat works much better on smaller, more concise worlds. The pace of building and expansion (basically all the non-combat stuff) felt much too slow for a combat world, so we’ve also been experimenting with streamlining and speeding up that part of the gameplay. We want players to get stuck into combat quickly without being bogged down too long in extensive village building and sculpting.


Example combat map


Looking at the Graphical User Interface

We had to make some extensive changes to the control scheme and GUI to accommodate the needs of combat mechanics too. While leashing was a fine way of getting followers about in Homeworld, it proved too slow and imprecise for ordering troops about. We added controls for moving selected Warbands anywhere or having them attack any target with a single click, more akin to what players would expect from an RTS game.

In the last update you saw the changes to the GUI. The banners are a great multipurpose feedback and control tool. At a glance you can see how many Warbands you have, what type of soldier they are, what kind of shape they are in and what they are currently doing. Not only that, but clicking one will centre your screen directly on the Warband allowing for fast navigation of the map to where it counts.




Of course, the new GUI features are taking up the space previously occupied by the Timeline button and unlocked cards display. The GUI change, different method of moving followers and various other mechanics adjustments are all contributing to making a combat world very different to Homeworld and Weyworld. Combat is rapidly evolving into an entirely separate mode altogether. The great advantage of this is that by keeping the gameplay experience of Homeworld and combat separate, we don’t have to try to squeeze everything into a single mode and make large GUI, tone and gameplay compromises. We already have systems and the precedent of delivering a different game mode within Godus (Voyages) and it’s becoming more and more attractive to deliver a combat experience in a similar manner.





Next Week - Programming


Anthony - Producer

Production time! Next week we'll have the finalisation of this combat sprint and a similarly in-depth look at the programming side of development with Richard.



"I've been stripping the tasks into JIRA for the next sprint and planning the finalisation week for this one. Next week, along with Richard's Programming Update, I'll share the contents of our next sprint plan and a small review of this one."

Thanks and catch up soon
22cans team!
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Following on from {LINK REMOVED}last week's update, Godus artist, Annah takes you through a few of the art elements being worked on during the current development sprint and a few words from Konrad.

Skinning & Modelling

"The Warbands are initially consisting of a small army of archers, so I thought it would be fun to give them a ‘Robin Hood’ style outfit and hat, with a quiver on their backs. "

"Their uniform colours (blue, red etc) denote whether their allegiance is to you or an enemy, and will help identify them in the field."

"However, after some in-game testing, we’ve realised that they needed to be modified slightly. Currently their build is very similar to a follower so it is quite hard to distinguish between each character (especially when you are zoomed far out, which is the popular viewpoint in when in combat.)"




"I’ve been bulking them up a bit, upgrading their costume, creating some female versions (because equal opportunities), and give their hats some more definition, among other things."

"The ‘skinning’ is the process of attaching the model to a rig, which has animations assigned to it. In Godus, we tend to use just a couple of rigs and I have to make sure the model is correctly skinned to these otherwise you can get some very strange character movements in game!"



Creating Warband Banners

"Warband banners appear when you create a warband through your military settlement."

"You move these around the map to navigate your warband. These banners need to show your colour, as well as the colour of the warband (something I’ll touch on in the GUI design below), be able to stack, animate, scale and potentially be carried by a member of the warband. The player banners also need to be easily distinguished from the enemy banners."



"At the moment the simplest way to show this is through a band of colour along the top that denotes your team colour, and the bottom colour displaying the warbands colour. The enemy banners are a different shape, and all one colour. Symbols on the banners may be added at a later date."



Combat UI - A Word from Konrad

Before Annah goes into detail regarding the user interface for combat, Konrad wanted to make sure people realise how much combat has changed and progressed from the Godus Alpha.



"While combat isn't new to Godus, some of our backers have experienced a crude, basic iteration of it in our early Alpha. At that time it really hadn't been the focus for development that it is now. This new combat implementation brought about some interesting changes and problems."

"The Alpha combat did not mesh well with the tone and feel of Godus. We experimented with introducing military settlements into Homeward & Weyword and the result was deemed very unsatisfactory, feeling very much out of place and shoehorned in."

“Over the last few months I’ve been experimenting with different worlds for combat to take place in. It’s changing the feel of what we have but for the better, I think."


Combat UI - Back to Annah!

"We needed a way of being able to select and view the warbands easily, as well as seeing their current status, even if they were not on screen."

"This involved rearranging the GUI a bit to allow for a strip of warband banners along the top. Initially, you will only be able to see the very bottom of a banner, but as soon as you are able to create a warband then it drops down slightly to notify you can do so through your Military Settlement."




"Each banner will display the colour of the warband (which is the same as the field warband banner), the warband rank (in stars along the top), an animated character that will represent whatever the warband is doing at that moment (i.e. running in a particular direction, standing still, or fighting), and the number at the base tells you how many there are in the warband. "

"When a warband's health begins to deteriorate, the banner becomes more and more ragged. When they are close to being wiped out, they'll be virtually ruined. Clicking on a top banner will take you to that warband, highlighted by a ring on the ground and potentially a line from the banner for the war band."




"We’ve moved the card button to the bottom left, so we can install a warning button. This spiky circle will tell you if a settlement, abode or warband is under attack, and clicking on it will take you directly to the problem area."

The GUI is always subject to change throughout implementation and testing as we discover the best ways for combat navigation.

Next Week

The next progress update will focus on the Design elements of this sprint. Konrad will give everyone a unique look into creating the artificial intelligence and level design structure. Here's a reminder of the sprint plan:



Thanks and catch up soon,
22cans team!
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Hello everyone!

Sorry for the period of quiet lately, we've had an exceedingly busy few weeks. In case you haven't heard we've had a number of new people join our band of creatives here at 22cans, including our new CEO - Simon Phillips!



We've managed to pull Simon away from his busy day to say hello:

“Hi, Simon here. It’s been an incredibly exciting and an incredibly busy few weeks here at 22cans. I’ve recently joined the company as CEO and part of that role includes looking at all the ongoing ways we can work smarter, more dynamically and produce better results."

Within this we solidified our company mission statement and that is ‘To create world changing ideas’, something that I genuinely believe we can do with the incredible talent we have in the studio. Godus is still very much part of our plans and will continue to be developed with the support of our, rather passionate, community."

"I hope to interact with the community as much as time allows and look forward to the team bringing high quality, meaningful updates on progress."


You can read more about Simon's arrival and the rest of the new staff on Develop Online

Right, what's been happening on Godus recently?

Well today we're starting something new, fresh, snazzy with the way we deliver information to our community and players! (That's you!)

Producer Anthony - another of the new 22cans members - has laid out our Sprint plan for Combat over the next few weeks and going forward we'll be giving you and idea of what we'll be working and how we're doing it.

A sprint is a period of time, usually one to three weeks, where the development team are all focused on completing specific elements. We use sprints internally to set reachable goals and targets to further the often tricky development cycle.

In Sprint 1, we'll be looking at the work done by the programmers, artists and designers. Here's our plan for the next three weeks.




Anthony - Producer

"In this sprint the team is busy working on the archers units. As one of the brand new addition to combat in Godus, it is really important that controlling and killing of these characters feel awesome. The team has been hard at work to make sure the basic combat interactions feel just right when put into players’ hands: from improving the pathfinding to iterating on the archers 3D models, this first sprint will all be about what players will see and manipulate when combating in Godus."

Over the coming week's we'll be sharing insights from the Art, Programming & Design team about their Sprint progression, challenges and impressions. Next week we'll be featuring Annah's upcoming artwork.

Thanks and catch up soon,
22cans team!
Community Announcements - sphillips
TEST
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


Thanks Pavle!

At the end of the month, Godus programmer Pavle has decided to move on to other things. Pavle has been known around the studio for his messy desk, passionate nature and love of Jaegerbombs.

Pavle has also been involved with our Kickstarter 'Making of' Documentary which is getting the finishing touches ironed out right now. Keep an eye out for more Documentary news in the coming weeks.

We wish him all the best with all his future endeavours.


We asked Pavle to have his own say about his time at 22cans:

"22cans was my first job, ever."

"I got an internship here after one year of university at the Instituto Superior Técnico in sunny Portugal because of an off-the-cuff e-mail I sent Peter Molyneux. In that e-mail I explained that I, while I was completely unexperienced and mostly uneducated, I was passionate about making amazing games and I was willing to work for very little money."

"I never expected anyone to even read that e-mail."

"Peter had just put up the address on a couple of articles about 22cans and I expected him to be getting flooded with correspondence, but he forwarded me to Tim Rance, who got me on a couple of skype calls with himself and the team (22cans had around 6 people at this time). Based on these calls the people at 22cans flew me over to Guildford and changed my life."


Pavle, Jack & Paul during development of Curiosity

"Through the madness of Curiosity I learned how to work really hard while still having an amazing time. At the same time I learned how to live by myself. With the Kickstarter campaign I was amazed by the support of people from around the world, and then with Godus I learned, and I'm still learning, how much a product needs to evolve to become great, and how much work that takes."

"Leaving has been a very hard decision but I'm comforted by the fact that I'll remain in touch with all the friends I've made here and Godus is left in the incredibly capable hands of Richard, Ryan and the rest of 22cans."

"My three years at 22cans were the most formative, interesting, amazing years of my life. I leave owing a tremendous debt of gratitude to everyone at 22cans that has taught me something or just helped me survive these secretly amazing grey English winters."

"I'll still be working as hard as I can these next 2 weeks but I might spend my last day hiding in the kitchen, reminiscing of the good times."





Meet Ryan

We have a new addition to the Godus programming team - Say hello to Ryan!

Tell us about yourself, Ryan!

"So.. My name is Ryan and I'm currently interning at 22cans as part of my course at Goldsmiths University. Before that, I studied Computer Science and previously worked for a design company as a creative technologist."

"I wanted to work for 22cans because I really enjoyed curiosity and Godus and I thought that it'd be great to be a part of the talented team at 22cans."


Ryan is currently working on our Combat Warbands - Creating a navigation system that allows the warband to navigate to their paths whilst staying in formation to give a more realistic feel to them. Neat!
Community Announcements - Midnight Bacon


What's been happening this week?

This week the team have working hard at polishing off a Combat build for an internal preview that, if successful, will be pushed to our Opt-In testing branch early next week! Most of the initial time consuming groundwork has been implemented and the team are now focusing on challenging artificial intelligence, tricky GUI elements and Annah's awesome art assets.

Thanks Jack!

As you may have heard, Jack Attridge - one of the original Godus co-designers left the 22cans team this week. He's off to start his own gaming venture after years of mentoring from Peter Molyneux and the rest of the team. Before Jack left, he was in charge of finishing off the 22cans Documentary mentioned in our Kickstarter.

Keep an eye out for this in the near future!

Good Luck Jack!



Fancy New Godus Combat Art!

Annah has created two new bits of Godus artwork and they're combat themed! He's a little glimpse at the sort of destruction that you can come to expect from the combat found in the final version.



Wallpaper One - Click here for 1080p Resolution Wallpaper!

Wallpaper One - Click here for 4K Resolution Wallpaper!



Click here for Full Sized Wallpaper! Wallpaper Two


Godus Opt-In Developer Builds

With all this talk of Godus Combat and Opt-In builds, we thought it might be time to remind the community about how to access our often buggy but feature packed Developer Builds! Please remember that these builds are meant for testing and might include all kinds of bugs that haven't been swatted by Martin yet!

Now is the perfect opportunity to dive in to Opt-In!

How to Opt In to Developer Builds

If you'd like to participate in our regular developer builds, just follow the easy instructions below.
  • Go to your Steam Library
  • Right click on GODUS and select "Properties"
  • Click on the "Betas" tab
  • Enter your beta access code, which is ‘22canstester'
  • Click "Check Code"
  • Click on the dropdown menu and make sure “releasetest” is selected
  • Hit "Close" and you're all set

At this point it's probably a good time to mention that players should create a back up of their Godus save games. In the event of a nasty bug, they'll be able to revert back with minimal problems!

Just follow the steps below:
  • Right click on Godus in your steam library
  • Select "Properties"
  • Go across to the "LOCAL FILES" tab
  • Select "Browse Local Files
  • Find the folder starting with "prf1" and make a copy somewhere save
  • Then to reload your old save if something goes wrong simply copy the contents from the OLD prf older into the NEW folder prf folder and when you next load the game it should be back to your old world.



Konrad's Korner

This week Konrad returned from his travels around Japan. After guzzling many of the sweets and goodies he brought back, we managed to ask him a few questions from community members regarding Combat!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7pjVrdxULA

Recent Bug Fixes

Martin is constantly inundated from the community with bugs found within Godus. Here's a recent list of ones Martin has squashed.
    ​​
  • The game crashes after relaunching the game while on any tutorial
    ​​
  • The game keeps on crashing when the user builds the first abode then relaunches the game
    ​​
  • User is unable to proceed to 'Weyworld' after unlocking and sailing the 'Ark' on 'Homeworld'
    ​​
  • The game randomly hitches while playing through the game
    ​​
  • The land under some Settlements reverts to its initial land formation after the user plays again on Weyworld
    ​​
  • Upgrading the 'Farming Settlement' will change the 'Settlement Size' value for 'Mining Settlement' and 'Builder Settlement' info modal on the 'Timiline' UI
    ​​
  • The description of the Shrine of Stamina ( Stronger Followers ) on the Timeline UI is incorrect
    ​​
  • Astari festival started after conquering Astari Village
    ​​
  • Various Translation Errors
    ​​
  • The value / text displayed on the Super Boost card description is incorrect

Friday GIF!

Here's a look at Richard's AI in motion! Here the computer AI is creating, squishing and evolving their follower lands. You can see that Richard isn't actually controlling it as the mouse pointer is completely stationary!



See you next week & keep sculpting!
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