Train Simulator - DTG_James
19/10/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/500212

The Southern Railway’s 2-HAL, a once-classic on the commuter scene, makes a comeback in this detailed add-on for Train Simulator!

Derived from the 2-BIL EMUs of the Southern Railway, the 2-HAL fleet was built with the purpose of populating the spate of newly-electrified main lines in Kent – from London Victoria and Charing Cross to Gillingham and Maidstone. The electrification project was monumental, and would transform the Chatham Main, North Kent and Medway Valley lines into how they more-or-less stand today.

As the railways were modernised, engineers at Eastleigh and Lancing Works began to produce a fleet of 76 brand new electric multiple units. The on-order fleet for the Southern Railway was of similar specification to the older 2-BIL, the most significant change was half as many toilets (Bi–Lavatory/Half Lavatory), however differences in construction lead to quite a different aesthetic for the new units.

The construction of the 2-HALs beat the electrification project, and so the new fleet was ran-in on the Southern Railway’s central section – running suburban services out of London Victoria – until Kent’s modernisation was complete. 2-HALs would finally arrive in Kent, more specifically the Chatham Main Line, in July 1939, and get to work on commuter services to Maidstone and Gillingham.

Services formed of 2-HAL sets, typically in 8 or 10-car formation (8/10-HAL), would depart London Victoria and split at the relocated Swanley station, with each half bound for Gillingham and Maidstone respectively, before performing the opposite operation on the journey back up to the capital. 2-HALs would also work the North Kent “metro” services, them too splitting at Strood and serving Gillingham and Maidstone out of London Charing Cross & Cannon Street.

Perhaps the most prestigious working that the 2-HALs partook was long distance services from Gillingham to Portsmouth, these weekend excursions were mainly put in place for naval personnel but could also accommodate regular passengers. The popularity of the 2-HALs was so just, that a second batch was fulfilled at the outbreak of war.

The Second World War was harsh on the 2-HALs, but none were totally destroyed, instead they would survive beyond the conflict and eventually wind up on the Brighton Main Line in the advent of the 1955 Kent Coast electrification scheme. The final passenger work for the 2-HALs, which had now been officially re-classified as the BR Class 402, was on the Coastway routes out of Brighton.

Some Class 402s were re-purposed as parcel stock, but all services ceased in 1971. Throughout the next several years, the entire fleet would be sold for scrap, none survived into preservation. The 2-HALs’ story has spanned decades, and a new chapter is opened as this Kentish classic is ready to enjoy in Train Simulator!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
12/10/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/376944/Train_Simulator_The_Alaska_Railroad_Anchorage__Seward_Route_AddOn/

One of North America’s most majestic, challenging, and famous contemporary railroad lines comes to Train Simulator with the Alaska Railroad – Seward to Anchorage route!

The Train Simulator Alaska Railroad – Seward to Anchorage route includes the Alaska Railroad’s line from Anchorage via Portage to Seward (114 route miles) as well as the important ARR line from Portage to Whittier, Alaska (12 route miles). And as an engineer on this extraordinary modern route, you’ll take the throttle of the Alaska Railroad’s powerful Electro-Motive SD70MACs and versatile GP38-2s, both of which are included with the route.

The Alaska Railroad – Seward to Anchorage route offers a superb variety of operating challenges and realistic experiences, ranging from lugging massive unit coal trains and manifests over the Kenai Mountains to yard and lineside industry switching duties at Anchorage to handling port switching jobs at Seward and Whittier.

Another fascinating aspect of operations on the Alaska Railroad is the railroad’s reliance on Direct Traffic Control (“DTC”) given that a majority of the route is not equipped with lineside signals (the areas around Anchorage and Whittier Tunnel being the exceptions). ARR’s use of Direct Traffic Control involves dispatchers providing, via radio transmission, permission for trains to operate within assigned DTC blocks. The Alaska Railroad – Seward to Anchorage route authentically re-creates ARR’s block system and DTC operations as well as the CTC-governed signaling around Anchorage and Whittier.

Along with the ARR Electro-Motive SD70MAC and EMD GP38-2, the Alaska Railroad – Seward to Anchorage route provides a variety of authentic and useful freight equipment, including flatbed container car, covered hoppers, center-beam flatcar, 4-chute coal hopper, timber flat, stack car, piggyback flat, boxcar, tank car, and ARR extended-vision cupola caboose. And this remarkable Train Simulator route also features a selection of nine career scenarios.

Experience the allure of Alaskan railroading, with the Train Simulator Alaska Railroad – Seward to Anchorage route!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
12/10/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/562398/Train_Simulator_GWR_Large_Prairies_Steam_Loco_AddOn/

The distinctive and incredible GWR Large Prairies comes to Train Simulator to fulfil a multitude of steam-era roles, courtesy of Partner Programme developer Victory Works.

In general, a “Prairie” steam locomotive is any that sits upon a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement, and particularly in tank locomotive form proved a very popular design worldwide. On British soil, the Southern Railway would be the only example of the “Big Four” to not produce Prairie locomotives in its lifetime.

The Great Western Railway however would dote on their 2-6-2T ‘tank’ locomotives for secondary and more rural duties. Some of the earliest examples were rather light, and were suitably called the ‘Small Prairies’; however, larger variants would also be produced, primarily for suburban commuter operations but initially for general use too. First appearing in 1903, these are the ‘Large Prairies’.

The first of many Large Prairies appeared in 1903 as GWR No. 99, a prototype design from Churchward that would become the basis for a production fleet of 39 ‘3100 Class’ tank locomotives. At heart, the 3100 Class was a mixed-traffic locomotive, and would be the start of a “workhorse” fleet for GWR and be found across the network throughout their lifetimes.

Differences between the prototype and production 3100s were next to none, only the tank shape was altered to improve visibility. Naturally, changes were implemented over time to improve the class, including altered weight distribution and a larger coal bunker; these changes warranted a fleet-wide reclassification, and so was introduced the 5100 Class, as most would now stay until withdrawal.

A handful of 5100 Class locomotives received further modifications in the late 1930s and were once again given new numbers. This move took place to bolster another fleet of Large Prairies, a fleet which was introduced earlier in the decade and itself derived from yet another production batch.

In the late 1920s, Churchward’s successor, Collett, sought to update the original 3100 Class design and have a large fleet built to fulfil local, suburban passenger roles. In fact, it was Collett’s development that resulted in the 3100 Class becoming the 5100 Class, all while a new batch of 5101 Class locomotives were produced to the same standard. Whereas only 40 of the original were built, Swindon Works would deliver 140 members of 5101 Class between 1929 and 1949.

Together, the 5100s and 5101s dominated traffic in all corners of the Great Western network, quickly growing and becoming a regular sight on all kinds of trains right up the end of the Second World War. Post-conflict, a rise in road usage and the introduction of diesel traction took its toll on the Large Prairies’ duties, seeing them take on new life as mainline support engines; providing backup as pilots and bankers on the more troublesome sections of the GWR such as the South Devon Banks, or the Severn Tunnel.

While prolific, the Large Prairies still only represent a portion of the entire fleet. A further 70 locomotives are still to be accounted for. These come in the form of the 6100 Class, another of Collett’s finest and built specifically for commuter services out of London Paddington.

The “Networkers” of their day, the 6100 Class was introduced in 1931 as a development of the 5101, and was based at Old Oak Common, Slough, Reading, and elsewhere. Being prominent in the passenger scene, enthusiasts quickly took to the class and nicknamed them ‘Tanner One-ers’, a call to their 61xx numbering and some currency of the day, a sixpence and a penny.

Much like the other Large Prairies’ story, a future of diesel forced the 6100s into other positions, but not before the fleet was joined by a previously mentioned extra batch of locomotives; may the 5100 Class re-enter centre stage.

It was the 6100 fleet that was reinforced by a modified micro fleet of 5100s; the latter was rebuilt with smaller driving and pony truck wheels, and received a boiler pressure increase (a common Large Prairie modification). 10 rebuilt 5100 Class locomotives were renumbered into the 8100 Class, and were destined to work alongside the 6100s, supposedly providing extra acceleration characteristics owing to their smaller wheels.

All GWR Large Prairie locomotives survived until the end of steam, by which point many of them were still in good shape, despite the oldest examples working beyond their 6th decade. Unfortunately, very few avoided the cutters’ torch after the steam-era’s final chapter. None of the 5100 or 8100 made it into the epilogue, it was a spot only reserved for 10 5101s and a lone 6100. Even then, only 4 out of the 11 are operational. Well, technically 5 see heritage service, but one was rebuilt into a 4300 Class tender locomotive. The rest are awaiting overhaul, apart from 6106 which is on static display at Didcot.

Fantastically, Victory Works has translated the GWR Large Prairies into Train Simulator, and the pack contains a bumper collection which Includes the 5100, 5101, 6100 and 8100 classes in GWR Green and British Railways Black liveries, complete with selectable era-appropriate logos, optional parts and fittings and a large variety of detail throughout!

The Tanner One-ers, the Large Prairies, a Great Western classic is yours to master in Train Simulator!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
05/10/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/621925/Train_Simulator_Hidaka_Main_Line_Tomakomai__HidakaMombetsu_Route_AddOn/

The wonderfully scenic Hokkaido region, by Partner Programme developer Union Workshop, brings the coastal Hidaka Main Line to life!

In 1913, the Tomakomai Light Railway opened a 2 ft 6 in gauge rail line between Tomakomai and Tomikawa, running along the south coast of Hokkaido, Japan’s second largest island. Additionally, there was also a line between Tomikawa and Shizunai, operated by the Hidaka Takushoku Railway.

In 1927, both railway companies were nationalised to form the Hidaka Line, and from 1929 until 1931, the now-unitary coastal route was re-laid using the more commonly used 3 ft 6 in “Cape” gauge. Further developments would continue, such as the extension of the line to Hidaka-mitsuishi in 1933 and the eventual terminus at Samani in 1937.

The Hidaka Main Line was first and foremost a passenger route, linking the nearby towns and communities together with both local, rapid, and even regional services. Every May, a special ‘tourist train’ was timetabled as a through connection with the Chitose Line.

The line was never a bustling one, it was not that sort of railway and it needn’t be, single diesel railcars formed the backbone of the Hidaka Main Line – including the bespoke KiHa 130 Series. The small fleet of 11 KiHa 130 DMUs were built to replace the older KiHa 40s, and started work on the Hidaka Main Line in 1988.

While the passenger life on the KiHa 130s was a peaceful one, the job of the driver was two-fold; not only did they have to drive the services, they were also in charge of selling tickets and the passengers’ welfare. Called the ‘one-man train’, working the Hidaka Main Line is the ultimate example of Driver Only Operation!

While capable of transporting the handful of passengers, and keeping to timetable, the KiHa 130 fleet was short-lived. Accelerated wear and tear from the salty, coastal, corrosive atmosphere, took its toll on the 130s, and before long they were not up to scratch. The irony being, that when the KiHa 130 fleet was forced into early retirement between 2000 and 2001, it was the KiHa 40s that once again took charge.

In its heyday, the Hidaka Main Line stretched across over 146 km of coastline, however that all changed in 2015 when a storm, and later a tornado, devastated the line; severing it beyond Atsuga. To put a stopper on disruption, JR Hokkaido put a bus service in place between Mukawa and Samani, with the railway now only active between Mukawa and Tomakomai. With passenger numbers so low in the first place, any thought of repairing the line and reinstating a full service has been abandoned.

While a shadow of its former self, the line still offers spectacular Japanese coastal views, sedate operations through fields of green, and a peaceful ambience as you trundle by. Union Workshop brings the Hidaka Main Line to Train Simulator as it is today, starting at Tomakomai and ending at Hidaka-mombetsu, not far from where the line is severed. In a mix-of-era approach, they are also reviving the KiHa 130 DMU, and driving this tiny railcar will be a most unique experience for even the well-practised of drivers!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
28/09/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/562373/Train_Simulator_Gatwick_Express_BR_Class_460_Juniper_EMU_AddOn/

The phenomenal BR Class 460, to exquisitely detailed Pro Range standard, brings the most authentic representation of Gatwick Express services yet for Train Simulator, courtesy of Partner Programme developer, Master Key Simulations!

A new millennium meant a whole new generation of services, and National Express were keen to procure a fleet of modern EMUs to replace the Class 73, Class 488 & Class 489 stock of their Gatwick Express services.

Alstom’s Juniper family had already been ordered in the UK and was under construction as the Class 334, for SPT/ScotRail, and the Class 458 for South West Trains. The Juniper line was also chosen for the new Gatwick Express stock, 64 carriages forming 8 8-car EMUs that were dedicated to non-stop express services packed with passengers and luggage. The new trains were designated the Class 460, and were built at Washwood Heath in Birmingham between 1999 and 2001.

The first Class 460 was delivered in 2000, and unlike many other EMUs of the day, featured a stylish, streamlined nose which improved efficiency at the Class 460s’ top speed of 100 mph. It was this sloping cab end that earned the class its nickname “Darth Vader”, owing to the similarity between the nose and the famed sci-fi villains’ helmet.

The 8-car trains were formed of a Driving Motor Luggage First Open, Trailer Open First Lavatory, Trailer Composite Open, Motor Standard Open, Motor Standard Open, Trailer Standard Open, Motor Standard Open, and Driving Motor Standard Open. THE ‘DMFLO’ was arranged at the London-end of every consist, as luggage was unloaded off the Gatwick Express and onto flights from the London-end of Gatwick Airport station.

Under National Express, the Class 460 fleet operated exclusively, and regularly, on non-stop services to Gatwick Airport and back. When the Gatwick Express franchise was absorbed into the South-Central franchise however, and Southern took over both ‘GatEx’ services and gained the Class 460 fleet, the branding remained but the 460s would also operate limited stop expresses between London and Brighton.

It would be the extension of services to Brighton that sparked the ‘end’ of the Class 460. Popularity meant that more stock was required, and Southern opted to lease the fleet of Class 442 ‘Wessex’ EMUs, previously withdrawn by South West Trains, for such services. After refurbishment, the Class 442s grew more favourable over the newer Class 460s, seating a handful more passengers and keeping to the timetable. The Class 442s would entirely replace the Class 460s by 2013.

Being part of the Juniper family, the Class 460 EMUs bared much technical resemblance to South West Trains’ Class 458 EMUs, and so to increase capacity on Reading and Windsor services, the Class 460s were split up, refurbished, and added to the 30 4-car Class 458s to form 36 5-car Class 458/5s. The distinct nose of the Class 460 was lost in favour of Class 450 compatibility, and their express-destined traction motors were downgraded to a much more suburban 75 mph.

Technically gone, yet still with us, the Class 460 was something of an icon for modern Southern Region travel. The Gatwick Express has always stood out among the crowd, be that with unique trains or striking liveries; and now, millennial operations are yours to command, in this exquisite reproduction of the BR Class 460 for Train Simulator!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
08/09/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/562378/Train_Simulator_Wutachtalbahn_Lauchringen__Immendingen_Route_AddOn/

Clinging to the Swiss border, the Wutach Valley Railway is perhaps the most unique and splendid in all of Germany. Packed with higher and lower speed running, stunning scenery and spectacular viaducts, the Wutachtalbahn, complete with fantastic steam action, is yours to experience in this stunning add-on for Train Simulator!

Despite plans for a railway to run south of the Black Forest that were drawn up as early as the 1860s, the Franco-Prussian war twisted Germany’s hand into building a strategic railway that could support military traffic, and remain on the local side of the Swiss border. Such a railway would give Germany a key advantage over any retaliatory strikes, allowing a swift delivery of supplies throughout Baden-Württemberg.

The line would diverge off the Black Forest Railway to Konstanz at Immendingen, and take a general south-westerly descent towards Lauchringen, where it joined with the Upper Rhine Railway. Either side of the line proved little construction or operational challenges; track layout was conventional, and line speeds were on par and other standard rural railways. A problem however did lie within the planned route’s central section.

Trains would need to fall roughly 250m in 9 km between Blumburg and Weizen, but with military, heavy military traffic the key focus of the entire line, gradients were not to exceed 1:100, and the connection was impossible through normal means. Instead engineers devised a similar strategy as seen on many mountain railways, they crossed the valley with multiple hairpin turns, grand viaducts and a complete 360° loop encased in a tunnel, a unique example of such a structure in Germany.

The line finally opened in the 1890s, and was home to mainly passenger traffic when its purpose as a military line needn’t be fulfilled. The winding nature of the central section saw the line adopt the nickname Sauschwänzlebahn (pigtail line), and its popularity among travelers was two-faced; yes, the scenery on offer was fantastic, but it came at a price, fares were calculated by route distance, and the pigtail took over 26 km to travel about 9 km.

The line was actually built with the provision of track-doubling in mind, but the line never proved busy enough to warrant such an upgrade. In fact, after the Second World War, the line’s use began to decline and passenger services began to fade away, until they were stopped in 1974 (with freight continuing up the southern section until 2001). Despite it all, the line’s lifespan would not be spent just yet.

In 1976, a voluntary organisation came together in an effort to re-open the line as a museum for steam locomotives, and the line’s popularity quickly grew as a tourist attraction. The preserved line drew such a crowd in fact, that the northern section of the line was also introduced as part of the ‘3er-Ringzug’, a passenger network linking the local areas of southern Germany together.

With the Wutachtalbahn, you can try something truly unique within Germany, operating along a heritage railway on the footplate of steam-era traction, all while taking in the spectacular sights!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
01/09/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/621920/Train_Simulator_Western_Hydraulics_Pack_AddOn/

Recount the iconic and distinctive hydraulics in this bumper package for Train Simulator featuring BR Class 35, BR Class 42 and BR Class 52 locomotives as they were in their heyday. This conversion kit for the Riviera Line in the Fifties: Exeter - Kingswear Route Add-On (available as a separate purchase) permits authentic operations on the route to the much-loved transitional diesel era.

Between 1961 and 1964, a total of 101 ‘D7000’ series locomotives were produced for the Western Region of British Railways. The D7000s worked out of Old Oak Common, Cardiff Canton and Bristol Bath Road, and with their 1700hp Bristol-Siddely/Maybach MD870 engines producing a maximum tractive effort of 46,600 lbf, could effectively handle secondary passenger and freight at speeds upwards of 90mph.

Much like most British Railways locomotives, the D7000s started life in BR Green livery, but some were soon seen in BR Blue before the entire fleet was untimely withdrawn from service. Unlike other classes however, the early Green guises were much more elaborate on the D7000s, featuring a Brunswick and light green body, medium grey roof, white window surrounds and on later iterations, yellow warning panels. Although never renumbered, the D7000 fleet was reclassified under TOPS as the BR Class 35, and they were nicknamed the “Hymek”.

Between 1958 and 1964, a total of 38 locomotives were built for express passenger services on BR’s Western Region, numbered in the series of D800 to D832 and from D866 to D870. These were allocated to Old Oak Common, Newton Abbot, Plymouth Laira and Bristol Bath Road, from where they headed trains such as the Cornish Riviera Express and the Bristolian. Unlike the D7000, the locomotives featured two Maybach MD650 engines providing a combined output up to 2270hp, so despite the similar top speed of 90mph, the ‘Warship’ Class 42 (as they would later be known) could haul significantly heavier loads.

Again, these locomotives started life in BR Green, although not as vibrant as the D7000’s variation, however the Western Region soon turned controversial as they adopted maroon as their new standard colour and applied it to the Class 42. By 1966, BR Blue started to appear on the fleet. Whereas the D7000s were not named, each Class 42 was, and all but two were named after Royal Navy vessels, and the fleet was known as the “Warship” diesels. As locomotives were re-liveried post-1968, the ‘D’ prefix was dropped from the number, and despite being reclassified as BR Class 42 under TOPS, this was not reflected in reality.

Between 1961 and 1964, a total of 74 ‘D1000’ series locomotives were constructed to relieve the D800s of the Western Region top-link expresses, for which they were underpowered. When new, the D1000s were allocated to Old Oak Common, Plymouth Laira, Bristol Bath Road, Cardiff Canton and Landore, however as Class 50s, and later the HST took their place, they were all based at Laira. Much like the D800s, the D1000s were fitted with two engines, but the Maybach MD655 was utilised, and a pair of them could produce a staggering 2700hp.

The D1000s were also subject to the likes of BR Maroon and BR Blue, however they were also seen in more unique liveries such as BR Desert Sand a trial in testing for a new standard colour for locomotives of BR. Interestingly, there has been debate over what type of blue was used on some D1000s; early reports stated a ‘chromatic blue’ was used, giving the locos a metallic sheen. Some enthusiasts accept that this is merely an early camera anomaly, and that no such blue was ever implemented. Every D1000 locomotive was named ‘Western…’ and a single word such as ‘Champion’, and so they were known as the “Western” class. Under TOPS, the D1000s became the BR Class 52, but were never renumbered as such before withdrawal.

For Train Simulator, the Western Hydraulic Pack brings the Hymeks, Warships (Class 42 only) and Westerns to life, as they were in operational service. Additionally, multiple liveries are present, and so are nameplates, a lot of nameplates!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
25/08/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/562386/Train_Simulator_New_Haven_E33_Loco_AddOn/

Built by General Electric in the 1950s to haul coal for the Virginian Railway, a group of 3,300-horsepower ignitron rectifier electrics were purchased second-hand in 1963 by the New Haven Railroad to haul tonnage between New York City and New Haven, Connecticut. Now, these powerful electrics – designated EF-4s by the NYNH&H – are ready for Train Simulator duty.

The ignitron rectifier electrics (often called GE E-33s) were purchased by the New Haven to restore electric freight operations on the railroad’s New Haven – New York City route. Weighing in at 394,000 and provided 98,500 lbs. of tractive effort, the road-switcher-style electrics were assigned road numbers 300-310 and dressed in a flashy New Haven vermillion, white, and black livery. On the NYNH&H, the six-axle (C-C) GE locomotives assumed virtually all mainline freight operations across the railroad’s electrified territory, working between Cedar Hill Yard in New Haven, Oak Point Yard in the Bronx, and Brooklyn’s Bay Ridge Yard. Although they had been constructed as heavy haulers, the electrics were also capable of quick running, being geared for a 65-mph top speed. By virtually all accounts, the EF-4s served the New Haven well and were a welcomed assignment by the road crews. Following the New Haven’s merger into Penn Central, the electrics served PC and eventually Conrail before being retired in 1981.

Created in extraordinary detail by Partner Programme developer Reppo, the NYNH&H EF-4 for Train Simulator faithfully recaptures the features and operating characteristics of this distinctive electric locomotive. The EF-4 is provided in both “running” and “cold and dark” variations, the latter featuring a realistic, multi-step start-up process. To provide period-appropriate equipment to accompany the EF-4, the pack also includes a 40-foot New Haven boxcar in familiar orange livery, NYNH&H’s classic NE-5 steel cupola caboose, and, for AI use, a New Haven Electro-Motive GP9. And the pack also includes four career scenarios for the NEC: New York – New Haven route which represents much of the ex-New Haven mainline trackage over which the distinctive and iconic rectifier electrics operated.
Train Simulator - DTG_James
17/08/2017

http://store.steampowered.com/app/621870/

Following the success of the incredible Albula Line, Thomson Interactive brings to life the scenic and vital Arosa Line for Train Simulator. Including even more nail-biting grades, a whole new set of unique challenges and a fresh, stunning perspective of the Alpine landscape.



This 25-km long line, which winds its way from Chur, the oldest town in Switzerland, all the way to Arosa, a Summer and Winter tourist resort, opened in December 1914 to both passengers and freight. Surprisingly, the distance between the two towns is less than 14 km, the route however gained its length from a multitude of hairpin turns which helped it climb over the 1,100m that separates the two communities.



Not only hairpins, but the Arosa Line (originally known as the Chur-Arosa-Bahn) features many tunnels and viaducts, including the Langwieser Viaduct, a pioneering reinforced concrete structure that spans the Plessur River with the single-track Arosa Line atop. The site today is of national significance, and in the winter months, Christmas lights are hung from the viaduct so it can be seen for miles after dusk. Given all the twists, turns and structures, it takes about an hour to traverse this breath-taking line.



While a standard route nonetheless, the approach, and of course departure from Chur is most unique. Over 2km of the track outside Chur’s main station runs through the streets of the town itself, this is known as the Chur stadtbahn (town railway), and requires extra vigilance as you share track with road traffic and pedestrians.



With Arosa being a tourist resort all year round, the line sees a lot of passenger traffic, but a significant amount of freight is also transported between the two towns. Mixed trains are a common occurrence on the Swiss railway network, so having to haul a little extra load is to be expected. Uniquely, it is not just locomotives that do the hauling, the local electric multiple units will also carry extra passenger coaches, as well as freight, along this incredible railway.



The latest EMU to be put to work along the Arosa Line is the RhB ABe 8/12 Allegra, this 3-car unit was introduced in 2009 and is designed to handle the steepest grades of the RhB railway network, such as those found between Chur and Arosa. The Allegra offers unmatched views for first class passengers, where windows can provide a driver’s eye view of the mountains, and is easily accessible with a low floored centre coach.



Not only does the Allegra perform as expected, it exceeded all measures in December 2009 when a not-in-service unit set a new metre gauge speed record, clocking in at 139 km/h. A total of 15 Allegra ABe 8/12’s operate in Switzerland, and all of them are named after famed Swiss men, including Friedrich Hennings, chairman of construction for the Albula Line, and Willem Jan Holsboer, a founder of the Rhaetian Railway (RhB).



Thomson Interactive has designed the new Allegra to be compatible with their dynamic pantograph height feature developed for the Albula Line and adopted for the Arosa Line. Cab features include pantograph selection, passenger information display control, traction speed control and a whole host of other dynamic features.
All of this, and more, is yours to experience in Thomson Interactive’s beautiful Arosa Line!
Train Simulator - DTG_James
In response to your important feedback on a variety of add-ons available for Train Simulator 2017, we have today released an update for the BR Class 150/1 DMU.

Here’s a list of what has been addressed:
  • Completely rewritten throttle physics to match prototype
  • Completely reworked brake performance to match prototype
  • Fixed an issue with the headlights
  • Fixed an issue with a number of missing audio assignments
  • Added bonus “Ex-Silverlink” London Overground Livery
If you own the BR Class 150/1, the update will download automatically from Steam. If you have any problems/queries with regard to the update, leave a comment below or submit a ticket to our support site where our Support Team will be ready to assist.

If you do not yet own the BR Class 150/1, why not? It’s perfect for not only Great Western territory, but also now the popular North London and Goblin Lines route! Pick it up and experience classic Sprinter action!

The BR Class 150/1 update will be approximately 130 MB in size.
...

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