Community Announcements - DTG_James
What a week for Train Simulator! Not only did we release the highly anticipated Chatham Main Line, the classic Kentish link between London & the Medway Towns, but we also released our BR Blue Diesel & Electrics Pack to compliment the Chatham Main Line as if it were back in the early 1980s. For this weekend we thought we would showcase some of the highlights we’ve seen following the release of the Chatham Main Line.

Creator of popular routes such as South London and Thameslink, North Jersey Coast & New Haven and Munich to Augsburg, Garmisch and Rosenheim, Danny – DTG employee and route merger extraordinaire from the Steam Workshop – has done it again with his latest route releases that feature the merge of London-Faversham High Speed, the Sheerness Branch and of course the Chatham Main Line. This vast route comes in two versions, circa~2012 and circa~2016, both of which differ to appropriately to the era in which they are set for example; old Rochester Station is used in 2012 and the new station features in 2016, the signalling also differs with East Kent Phase 2 signalling coming into play in the most recently timed version, another notable change is the remodeling of Gravesend Station which has occurred in recent years.

Regardless of which version you prefer, the routes give you the opportunity to run from Faversham or Sheerness-on-Sea to either London Victoria (via Herne Hill or Catford) or to St. Pancras Intl via Strood. Like the Chatham Main Line, the route also includes the branch to Orpington.

You must own London-Faversham High Speed, the Sheerness Branch and the Chatham Main Line for these routes to work.

Click here for more information - http://train-simulator.com/run-the-ultimate-south-east-network/
Community Announcements - DTG_James
What a week for Train Simulator! Not only did we release the highly anticipated Chatham Main Line, the classic Kentish link between London & the Medway Towns, but we also released our BR Blue Diesel & Electrics Pack to compliment the Chatham Main Line as if it were back in the early 1980s. For this weekend we thought we would showcase some of the highlights we’ve seen following the release of the Chatham Main Line.

Creator of popular routes such as South London and Thameslink, North Jersey Coast & New Haven and Munich to Augsburg, Garmisch and Rosenheim, Danny – DTG employee and route merger extraordinaire from the Steam Workshop – has done it again with his latest route releases that feature the merge of London-Faversham High Speed, the Sheerness Branch and of course the Chatham Main Line. This vast route comes in two versions, circa~2012 and circa~2016, both of which differ to appropriately to the era in which they are set for example; old Rochester Station is used in 2012 and the new station features in 2016, the signalling also differs with East Kent Phase 2 signalling coming into play in the most recently timed version, another notable change is the remodeling of Gravesend Station which has occurred in recent years.

Regardless of which version you prefer, the routes give you the opportunity to run from Faversham or Sheerness-on-Sea to either London Victoria (via Herne Hill or Catford) or to St. Pancras Intl via Strood. Like the Chatham Main Line, the route also includes the branch to Orpington.

You must own London-Faversham High Speed, the Sheerness Branch and the Chatham Main Line for these routes to work.

Click here for more information - http://train-simulator.com/run-the-ultimate-south-east-network/
Community Announcements - DTG_James
What a week for Train Simulator! Not only did we release the highly anticipated Chatham Main Line, the classic Kentish link between London & the Medway Towns, but we also released our BR Blue Diesel & Electrics Pack to compliment the Chatham Main Line as if it were back in the early 1980s. For this weekend we thought we would showcase some of the highlights we’ve seen following the release of the Chatham Main Line.

Creator of popular routes such as South London and Thameslink, North Jersey Coast & New Haven and Munich to Augsburg, Garmisch and Rosenheim, Danny – DTG employee and route merger extraordinaire from the Steam Workshop – has done it again with his latest route releases that feature the merge of London-Faversham High Speed, the Sheerness Branch and of course the Chatham Main Line. This vast route comes in two versions, circa~2012 and circa~2016, both of which differ to appropriately to the era in which they are set for example; old Rochester Station is used in 2012 and the new station features in 2016, the signalling also differs with East Kent Phase 2 signalling coming into play in the most recently timed version, another notable change is the remodeling of Gravesend Station which has occurred in recent years.

Regardless of which version you prefer, the routes give you the opportunity to run from Faversham or Sheerness-on-Sea to either London Victoria (via Herne Hill or Catford) or to St. Pancras Intl via Strood. Like the Chatham Main Line, the route also includes the branch to Orpington.

You must own London-Faversham High Speed, the Sheerness Branch and the Chatham Main Line for these routes to work.

Click here for more information - http://train-simulator.com/run-the-ultimate-south-east-network/
Community Announcements - DTG_James
19/05/2016

http://store.steampowered.com/app/376946/

Just a stone’s throw from Dovetail Games’ HQ, the Chatham Main Line is one of the main arterial routes from central London through the heart of Kent via the Medway towns, towards the Kent Coast – and you can now discover this picturesque route in Train Simulator.

The line was originally built by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LC&DR), starting at London’s second busiest termini, London Victoria. The station originally opened in October 1860 as the eventual terminus for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway; however, two years later an expansion to the station was built for the LC&DR.

Running from London Victoria, the line passes the famous Battersea Power Station and criss-crosses lines to south London stations such as Clapham Junction. After Wandsworth Road and Clapham High Street, the line diverges through Herne Hill, West Dulwich, Penge East and Beckenham Junction; services can also take the Catford Loop Line, which passes through Denmark Hill, Peckham Rye and Catford.

The lines merge again at Shortlands and head into Kent, crossing the South Eastern Main Line (which serves other London termini such as Charing Cross or Cannon Street) and the main line between Ashford and Swanley.

Between Farningham Road and Longfield, the Chatham Main Line crosses the junction previously used by Eurostar trains from Waterloo International to pick up High Speed One. Although the line still exists, it is reserved for emergency use only by Class 395 ‘Javelins’. After crossing the River Medway, the line runs through the Medway Towns and follows the North Kent coastal towns to Faversham before splitting to either Ramsgate and Margate or Folkestone and Dover.

The line has passed between several operators in its life; at the time of sectorisation, the line was operated by Network SouthEast and transferred to Connex South Eastern after privatisation. Today the line is operated by Southeastern, part of the Govia Group, who operate Class 375s and Class 465s from the capital to the Medway Towns and the Kent Coast. Southeastern operate via two different routes, services from the Kent Coast travel to Bromley South and via the original route through Kent House and West Dulwich into Victoria, while services originating in the Medway towns frequent the Catford Loop via Denmark Hill into the terminus.

Updates to the line and rolling stock in recent years have seen Southeastern’s roster of four-car Class 375 units repainted into the company’s new dark blue livery, which at the same time some of Class 465/9s that operate out of Gillingham and Rochester are receiving an interior refresh as part of the refurbishment programme. In December 2015, a new station at Rochester was also opened to cope with modern passenger demand and longer trains operating on the route. The original station had stood since the early 1890s, with the new station sited 500m west of the original structure.

Chatham Main Line: London-Gillingham for Train Simulator recreates the 43 mile (69km) route between London Victoria and Gillingham (Kent), via Kent House and Denmark Hill, including the new Rochester Station. Also included are several EMUs representative of services seen today on the route, such as the Class 465/0 in Southeastern ‘Grey Stripe’ livery, Class 465/1 in Southeastern ‘Blue Stripe’ livery and Class 375 ( including /3, /6 and /7 variants) in Southeastern ‘Dark Blue’ livery.
Community Announcements - DTG_James
19/05/2016

http://store.steampowered.com/app/376950/

Synonymous with the most recognisable period in British Rail’s history, the ‘Rail Blue’ livery carried across BR’s roster of diesel and electric locomotives and multiple units stretched across three decades, as represented in this collection of BR Blue diesel and electric locomotives for Train Simulator.

The BR Class 09 is a class of 0-6-0 diesel locomotives originally designed for shunting and short distance freight trips along branch lines. In total, 26 of the Class were built, similar in appearance and specification to the Class 08 but with different gearing to deliver a higher top speed.

The BR Class 33, also known as ‘Type 3’ or ‘Crompton’, was built specifically for the Southern Region between 1960 and 1962. A total of 98 locomotives were built with the ability to supply new electric train heating, rather than the ubiquitous steam heating which was prevalent in BR’s passenger rolling stock. Although generally based in the southern part of the England, the locomotives were found as far north as York and South Lanarkshire during their operating lives.

The electro-diesel BR Class 73 was one of the few locomotives built by British Rail with dual power control. With an increase in electrification in the Southern Region, the Class 73 was designed to operate on the 650/750V DC third rail system, as well as on non-electrified track with its diesel engine. Between 1984 and 2005, Class 73 locomotives were used as traction on Gatwick Express services, in partnership with Class 489 Gatwick Luggage Vans as ‘push-pull services.

With electrification of the Southern Region, BR introduced a number of Electric Multiple Units (EMUs), including the BR Class 416 ‘2EPB’. Built over a three year period from 1953, the 2EPB was intended for inner suburban passenger services around London, and were in service as late as the 1980s on North London line services between Richmond and North Woolwich.

The BR Class 421 (originally ‘4CIG’ before TOPS introduction) EMUs were built at BR York Works between 1964 and 1972. The units were originally allocated to Brighton Main Line services, with a second batch allocated to services around Portsmouth, although latterly spent time across the Southern Region. The 4CIG is probably most famous for its ‘slam door’ nickname, so called as newer units with sliding or plug doors were introduced.

The Rail Blue (or Monastral Blue) livery became standard across BR’s roster from 1965 onwards. The colour was, in fact, a dark, greyish blue designed to hide dirt well, although this was often portrayed inaccurately in photographs. The colour was applied to all diesel and electric locomotives, with the exception of the ends, which were painted yellow to improve visibility to lineside workers; the livery was also applied to coaching stock and multiple units with some variations.

The first break in Rail Blue uniformity came in 1976 with the introduction of a blue/grey livery or what was known as BR Corporate Blue at the time, on InterCity 125 (HST) sets – the blue colour being carried around to the front of HST sets. This blue also incorporated a marginally darker and richer blue pigment to further hide the oily residues left by the predominant diesel emissions of locomotives at the time. However, most traction maintenance depots around the country were forced to source their paints from local suppliers. This situation resulted in different shades of both the blue and the yellow being applied to locomotives – some locomotives were almost turquoise in colour while others were almost royal blue.

By the mid-1980s, both Rail and Corporate Blue liveries had been replaced on all BR locomotives and coaching stock in favour of the newer InterCity “Red Stripe” and InterCity Executive liveries.

Also included with the pack are OBA Wagons and General Utility Vehicles (GUVs) to form freight and parcel/newspaper services hauled by the locomotives included in the BR Blue Pack.

The locomotives included in the BR Blue Pack are also Quick Drive compatible, giving you the freedom to drive them on any Quick Drive enabled route for Train Simulator, such as those available through Steam. Also included are scenarios specifically for the Chatham Main Line: London-Gillingham route (available separately and required to play these scenarios).
Community Announcements - DTG_James
19/05/2016

In response to your important feedback, today we have released an update to Train Simulator to improve the .ap archive format, details of which can be found below.

We have made improvements to the efficiency of our .ap archives within Train Simulator, this will resolve the display of non-English languages for addons packaged in the .ap archive format and resolve the issue of addons disappearing from the front end menu as a result of having too many .ap archives cached at any one time.

The Train Simulator 56.4b update will download automatically from Steam. If you have any problems/queries with regard to the update, leave a comment below or submit a ticket to our support site where our Support Team will be ready to assist.

The Train Simulator 56.4b update will be approximately 33.5 MB in size.
Community Announcements - DTG_James
To provide players with great value for money, we have teamed up with Thomson Interactive to build a collection from their routes to provide you with a variety of content all under one impressive price!

This collection includes the following:
  • WCML Trent Valley
  • Glasgow Airport Rail Link
  • West Highland Line Extension
  • European Loco & Asset Pack
Pick it up here - http://dtg.link/bBL5Y
Community Announcements - DTG_James
12/05/2016

http://store.steampowered.com/app/325976/

Set in the 1930s during the Colorado and Southern era, Clear Creek Narrow Gauge is a three-foot gauge line running from Golden to Silver Plume, Colorado. Complete with coal-fired and oil-fired versions of the B4D locomotive, plus period-appropriate passenger and freight rolling stock, and sections of dual-gauge track, Clear Creek Narrow Gauge perfectly captures this golden era of Western railroading.

Starting around 15 miles west of Denver at Golden, the line heads west through Clear Creek Canyon until it splits at Forks Creek, where there is a loco depot. The section from Golden is dual-gauge as far as Crusher, where it reverts to three-foot gauge. The branch to the mining towns of Black Hawk and Central City goes off to the north and the mainline continues west.

On the branch, the line has a double 'switch back' to gain elevation between Black Hawk and Central City. The mainline passes through Idaho Springs about eight miles west of Forks Creek, where there are many rail served mines. West of Idaho Springs, the line continues to follow Clear Creek to Georgetown. At Georgetown the steep ascent on 3.5% grades starts to Silver Plume around the famous Georgetown Loop where the line does a loop over the top of itself and a double horseshoe before arriving at Silver Plume.

The line was closed in the early 1940s but the Georgetown Loop has since reopened as a tourist railway between Georgetown and Silver Plume.

Along the route there are numerous bridges, passes and gradients of 1-in-25 or steeper, making Clear Creek Narrow Gauge an involving driving experience. The route is not signalled in the conventional sense, as in real life, train movements were controlled via a train order system using written order slips.
Community Announcements - DTG_James
Please be aware Clear Creek Narrow Gauge has released, however due to a temporary error on Steam the US exclusive version of this route has been made available to to users in all regions. This is an error and users who purchase this version outside of the US will be unable to run the content.

There are 2 versions of this content currently available:
  • Clear Creek Narrow Gauge Common Route Add-On (USA Customers Only) - Contains BNSF Branding and will not work for users outside of the US.

  • Clear Creek Narrow Gauge Common Route Add-On (Non USA Customers) - Contains all content included in "USA Customers only" pack minus BNSF branding and will run for all users outside of the US
Please do not purchase the "USA Customers Only" pack if you are based outside of the US.
Community Announcements - DTG_James
28/04/2016

http://store.steampowered.com/app/222573

The Electro-Motive GP20 was designed to satisfy the railroads’ 1960s demands for ever-more horsepower. In a production run lasting from November 1959 to April 1962, the EMD GP20 came to symbolize both the beginnings of the “second generation” of North American dieselization and the “horsepower race” of the early 1960s.

The GP20 was the first of EMD’s long line of successful “Geeps” to be turbocharged, providing the locomotive with 2,000 horsepower. A total of 260 GP20s were constructed for seven U. S. railroads – and the first buyer of the landmark locomotive was the Western Pacific.

Western Pacific’s GP20s were built with high noses (a design that had been the norm in the 1950s but would soon be replaced by a short front hood offering enhanced visibility). The units were equipped with dual controls for ease of bi-directional use, weighed 257,000 pounds, and were dressed in Western Pacific’s attractive and iconic “Zephyr” silver and orange livery.

WP utilized its GP20s system-wide use, frequently calling upon the versatile diesels to tote heavy or priority tonnage through the rugged Feather River Canyon. Most of Western Pacific’s GP20s remained in service until WP was merged into Union Pacific in 1982, and in 1985 Union Pacific donated Western Pacific 2001 – the first GP20 built – to the Feather River Rail Society and the diesel is today preserved at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum in Portola, California.

Developed by Reppo, the Western Pacific GP20 for Train Simulator features a range of advanced operating features, including authentic start-up procedures and highly realistic operating controls, and a detailed cab interior with dual, bi-directional engineer control stands.

The locomotive also is Quick Drive compatible, giving you the freedom to drive the Western Pacific GP20 High Nose on any Quick Drive enabled route for Train Simulator, such as those available through Steam. Also included are scenarios specifically for the Feather River Canyon route (available separately and required to play these scenarios).
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