Alan Wake

As you may have spied Andy reporting a couple of week's back, Remedy Entertainment's Alan Wake was removed from Steam on May 15 as a result of "expiring music licenses." 

As Andy notes here, the inclusion of Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, Roy Orbison, David Bowie, Depeche Mode and similar top-flight bands/musicians forced the Finnish developer to remove the game from online stores—an unfortunate occasion it celebrated with a so-called Sunset Sale, whereby the action adventure 'em up was discounted by 90 percent. 

It's now gone from Steam, however if you're yet to pick up the game Jon "Log" Blyth awarded a hearty 86 in his 2012 review, know that the Humble Store is still selling DRM-free keys for £22.99/$29.99. 

As a reseller, Humble's stock is of course in limited supply, but this still provides those who missed out last week a chance to get in on the action. Head in this direction to do so. 

Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info. 

Alan Wake - Valve
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Alan Wake - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alice O'Connor)

Remedy Entertainment’s third-person spooker Alan Wake [official site] will receive a 90% discount on Steam this weekend, right before it gets pulled from stores – possibly forever. The Max Payne creators says Alan Wake has to go because its music licenses are expiring. Pop songs play at the end of each chapter, see, which means that Alan Wake was killed by a conspiracy including Roy Orbison, Nick Cave (I’ve always said those mates of his are some real bad seeds!), and David Bowie. If you already own Alan Wake or buy now, you will still get to download and play after it’s pulled from sale. … [visit site to read more]

Alan Wake

According to a tweet by Remedy Entertainment, Finnish creator of Alan Wake, its atmospheric horror game will be "removed from stores" (including Steam) on May 15 because of "expiring music licenses."

One of my favourite things in Alan Wake is the song that plays over the end credits of each episode, including Up Jumped The Devil by Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds and In Dreams by Roy Orbison. But it seems the inclusion of these songs has forced Remedy to remove the game from Steam.

The developer is 'celebrating' this news with a so-called Sunset Sale, offering a 90% discount on the game from May 13 (10am PST) until the game vanishes for good on May 15. If you own the game it'll remain in your Steam library, so this is your last chance to grab it before it vanishes.

Alan Wake - LauriRMD
If you have not yet played Time Magazine’s 2010 Game of the Year, now is your final chance. Remedy’s Alan Wake is going offline from stores. This is due to the expiration of music license agreements for the game. Alan Wake’s American Nightmare is not affected.

For 48 hours, you can buy Alan Wake including DLCs and Alan Wake’s American Nightmare at a 90% discount on Steam.

If you already own Alan Wake – like the majority of the gaming population out there – you have nothing to worry about. The game will stay in your library and continue to work for you.
Alan Wake

Finnish studio Remedy Entertainment has been around for more than 20 years. In that time, it's managed to release Max Payne and a sequel; Alan Wake and a sequel; and, earlier this year, Quantum Break. (There's also its first game, Death Rally, which it remade in 2011, but nobody's ever heard of that one.) It's not exactly a blistering pace of development, which is why Remedy's decided to split itself into two teams, working on two separate projects at the same time!

First things first: we ll continue supporting Quantum Break, which became the 'biggest-selling new Microsoft Studios published IP this generation.' It s something we re extremely proud of, so thank you to all of our fans for making the game a success and our long-time partner Microsoft for helping us create something unique, Remedy wrote in a State of the Studio blog post.

As for the future, we have some very exciting news to share. Moving forward, we want to create more games and hopefully get them out more often. In order to achieve this, Remedy has expanded into two game development teams, the message says. For a while now already, we ve been developing a brand new Remedy game with a new partner. Our second team is working on an early concept, which will turn into another Remedy game sometime in the future.

Sadly, neither of the two projects Remedy is currently working on is a new Alan Wake game, although it added that we re exploring opportunities in other mediums to tell more Alan Wake stories. Beyond that, though, it plans to keep a lid on what it's getting up to for a good while yet.

We can t wait to show and tell you more about these new projects, but if there s anything we ve learned from the past, it s that we should have the patience to announce games when they re ready enough, Remedy said. So don t expect us take the stage at E3 or gamescom this year.

The PC Gaming Show returns to E3 on Monday June 13, featuring game announcements, updates to existing favourites, and conversation with top developers. You can find out what to expect here, and also book free tickets to attend in person at pcgamingshow.com. The PC Gaming Show will be broadcast live through twitch.tv/pcgamer from 11:30 am PT/2:30 pm ET/6:30 pm GMT, but be sure to tune in beforehand to check out The Steam Speedrun, in which one lucky winner will buy as many games as they can in three minutes.

Alan Wake

The excitement around here ratcheted up noticeably when word went out that Remedy might, maybe, be thinking about getting to work on a new Alan Wake game. The first hint was dropped by way of an application for a trademark on something called Alan Wake's Return, and the theory firmed up with the discovery of an Alan Wake's Return video in a preview of Remedy's upcoming Quantum Break.

It all seemed so clear—until Remedy Creative Director (and original Max Payne face) Sam Lake told Kotaku UK that the trademark isn't for a new game, but for the live-action television series that will appear in Quantum Break.

A big part of the trademarking process all in all is the legalities of it," Lake said. "Just making sure everything is covered." Remedy is exploring possibilities and concepting different things, he added, but lots needs to click into place for anything to happen.

And anything can happen—remember, there was a time when the original Alan Wake wasn't going to make it to the PC, nor was Quantum Break for that matter—but right now, Lake said, there's no real news about anything future Alan Wake-related." Sorry, folks.

Alan Wake

I largely stuck to the beaten path for my Quantum Break hands-on last week, which it now turns out was a terrible mistake. Polygon reports that if you decide to go wandering in the game s opening section set on a university campus, you ll eventually stumble across a student demonstration, and a tent with a flat screen TV inside, on which a trailer for Alan Wake s Return is playing.

The footage sounds like it s full of the pulp horror portentousness that was the delicious signature of Remedy s horror-flavoured game: Crashing waves… He's been gone for five years ... Spooky forest… We're just a speck of light floating in an endless ocean of darkness ... Detectives with torches, dead bodies, bloody knives, inevitably jazzy music.

Whether the trailer s existence means the game is really set for a sequel remains unclear. It could equally just be a cool piece of fan service, laced throughout Quantum Break as Remedy is wont to do for its games. However, giving credence to the idea it could be an actual sequel, we learned late last month that Remedy has filed a trademark for Alan Wake s Return. As an inveterate horror fan with a high tolerance for florid writing and Americana, I d certainly be up for it. How about you?

Alan Wake

The last we heard, an Alan Wake sequel was not on the cards. Remedy tried, built a prototype, pitched it to publishers, but no one was biting. Remedy's talks with Microsoft ended up spawning Quantum Break, which as we now know, is on its way to PC. Could something else accompany it? Remedy has now applied for the trademark 'Alan Wake's Return'.

It's not so far fetched to believe a sequel is in the works. "I would love to do that," Remedy creative director Sam Lake said when the prototype footage emerged. "It feels that time has only refined the ideas of what the sequel would be, which is great. It's almost, in some ways and on some level, that all of this extra time to think it about it has made it tastier and more exciting."

In addition, the Xbox edition of Quantum Break comes with a free copy of Alan Wake. It could just be a random act of generosity, but it might as easily lay the groundwork for, well, Alan Wake's Return.

We've got a few Alan Wake diehards on the PCG team—the conjunction of fast-paced survival horror with the meditative forests of the Pacific Northwest and the hallmarks of classic horror fiction more than makes up for the delay it endured coming to PC.

Max Payne - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Adam Smith)

Remedy (Max Payne, Alan Wake) have been making gorgeous, violent games about angry-sad men for years now. When they announced their latest, Quantum Break [official site], it was revealed as an Xbox One exclusive. Moments ago, they announced that the time-troubling action game will also be coming to PCs. As long as those PCs are running Windows 10. There’s a proper trailer below, along with a newly released live action thing.

… [visit site to read more]

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