Don't Starve - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alice O'Connor)

You summer holiday to a tropical city populated by aristocratic ambulant ham, I’m sorry to say, must become a winter vacation. Don’t Starve developers Klei Entertainment this week announced that they have delayed the launch of its Hamlet expansion from June to December 2018, saying “we’re not quite where we want Hamlet to be yet.” Which is fair enough: better late than rubbo. In the meantime, you can see more of the possibilities and problems of posh pigpeople in Hamlet’s new E3 trailer. (more…)

Don't Starve

At the PC Gaming Show today, Klei showed off a gameplay trailer for Don't Starve's next expansion, Hamlet. Check that out above.

"In Don’t Starve: Hamlet, Wilson discovers a lost town of aristocratic Pigmen nestled within a foreboding tropical jungle," says Klei. "Reacquaint to city life with pig shops, houses, new items, biomes and more, or delve into the ancient pig ruins and try your hand at treasure hunting in this new single player expansion."

Find out more on the Steam DLC page. Don't Starve: Hamlet will be out December 2018.

Mark of the Ninja

Update: Another batch of top-shelf indies have made their way into GOG's sale, including quite a few horror games. Here are some of the best: 

Original story follows. At the time of writing, all deals included in the original story are still live.  

Original story:

A bunch of good indie games are cheap on GOG right now. Nearest I can tell, there's no discernible pattern or schedule to these deals, but the discounts are steep and the games are great, so no complaints can be made. Here are some of the standouts: 

Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.  

Don't Starve - Klei-JoeW

Ahoy, traveler! Can you hear that ocean calling your name?

We're happy to announce the Home Sea Home content update has washed up on the shores of Don't Starve: Shipwrecked. Light your way with new luminescent Rainbow Jellies, befriend some mischievous Ballphin pals, or just kick your feet up in your base on the waves and enjoy that cool sea breeze.

World
  • Crocodogs. Will hound you at land and sea.
  • Ballphin followers and the Ballphin Den.
  • Roe. New food item. Stocks the fish farm.
  • Cormorants. New sea bird. Source of Roe.
  • Tar Slick. Pools of crude oil bubbling on the surface of the water.
  • Tar. New resource.
  • 3 new variety of tropical fish.
  • Rainbow Jellyfish. 
  • Coral Nubbin. Replant coral after it's mined.
  • Ox will produce offspring.
New Craftables
  • Buoyant Chiminea and Sea Lab . Make your base at sea.
  • Sea Yard. Keeps your ship repaired on the water.
  • Tar Extractor. Gets Tar from Tar Slick.
  • Tar Suit. Temporary protection from wetness.
  • Tar patch. A sticky situation.    
  • Oil Lamp. Quick lightsource for land and sea.    
  • Fish Farms. Grow food on the water.
  • Encrusted Boat.
  • Quackering Ram. New craftable for the Quacken Beak.
  • Sea wall. Water craftable wall. Blocks waves.
  • Tropical Bouillabaisse. New recipe with new tropical fish. 
  • Caviar. New recipe with Roe
Bug Fixes
  • Support added for fullscreen mode on Windows XP.
  • Fixed a but that caused an occasional crash when loading minions.
  • Fixed a bug where crafted items would come out wet.
  • Coral reef’s grow time reloads properly now.
  • Growables can now advance multiple states when off screen instead of one maximum.
  • The player won’t pop about when planting elephant cacti now, so they can’t sometimes get stuck between them.
  • Some trawlnets shouldn’t remain forever now.
  • The surfboard won’t kick off flotsam while in the player’s inventory.
  • Fixed a freeze at the key binding screen.
  • Fix for an animation bug on plantables being picked while windy.
  • Fat Packim will revert back to regular Packim properly now.
  • Flup spawner won’t block building placement now.
  • Fixed a missing texture for Snakeskin rug turf on the minimap
  • Fixed a duplication bug when using the orange amulet.
  • Fixed Iron Wind missing animation.
  • Fixed Dumbrella color bug.
  • Fixed a rare crash with the telescope
  • Lobsters won’t burn underwater.

[GAME HOTFIX] 243469 - 11/24/2017
  • Fixed missing animation on Beefalo and Monkeys in vanila Don’t Starve
  • Fixed an issue with being unable to hammer coral for it’s nubbins.
  • Fixed an issue when unequipping boat items from a different boat than the players.

[GAME HOTFIX] 243968 - 11/28/2017
  • Home Sea Home update name present on the main menu
  • Crocodogs won’t spawn when turned off in the world gen options
  • Fixed missing animation with Baby Beefalo in Vanilla Don’t Starve
  • Fixed missing animation with the mosquito in DS and ROG.
  • Fixed a problem with the Corcodog warning bark.

[GAME HOTFIX] 245789 - 12/08/2017
  • Fixed some controller bugs and a graphic problem with shadow creatures in Linux and OSX
  • Fixed pirate hat birds in vanilla DS
  • Hammer can now be stored in chests using a controller
  • Closing and opening the craft menu with a controller will now return to the same menu category.
  • Fixed the crafting menu missing text in Vanilla and ROG Shipwrecked compatible worlds.
  • Fixed an issue with the shadow creature art in OSX and Linux

[GAME HOTFIX] 246228 - 12/11/2017
  • Fixed missing walls in Vanilla DS

[GAME HOTFIX] 246924 - 12/15/2017

Fixes the issue of old cave and volcano worlds being reused. Also fixes a couple ballphin bugs.
  • Fixed a bug that would reuse old cave and volcano maps after the player's game had ended.
  • Fixed a bug that allowed some ballphins to spawn on land
  • Fixed a bug where an invisible object (ballphin pod manager) could block building.
Don't Starve - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alice O'Connor)

If you’ve got the hang of not starving with your pals in multiplayer survival sandbox Don’t Starve Together, it’s time for a new challenge: not getting kicked to bits in a gladiatorial arena together. Don’t Starve Together has launched the first of its new time-limited events, a trip into a fiery world to fight the Battlemaster’s army. Still, maybe you’ll get to drink your own spilt blood, eat your own smashed-off limbs, and die sated.

Klei Entertainment are holding a big sale this weekend too, including their own (Invisible Inc, Mark of the Ninja…) as well as those they’ve published (Darkest Dungeon, Crypt of the NecroDancer…). Good video games.

(more…)

Don't Starve

An extraordinary collection of indie games is currently discounted on Steam as part of developer Klei Entertainment's weekend sale. Naturally, Klei's greatest hits are all discounted, but notably so are a few games that they had a hand in or just really like. The sale runs through 10 a.m. Pacific (1 p.m Eastern) Monday, November 13.

The star of the sale is easily the Best of Klei Bundle. At 77 percent off, the $20 bundle gets you Don't Starve and both its Reign of Giants and Shipwrecked DLCs; Don't Starve Together, for which Klei is currently running the free Forge event; Mark of the Ninja and its Special Edition DLC; as well as Invisible Inc. and its Contingency Plan DLC. 

They're all great, and all available individually, but the bundle discount is definitely the better deal. But if you've got a hankering for Don't Starve in particular, check out the $13 Don't Starve Mega Pack.  

Shank and Shank 2, two of Klei's earliest games, are both $2.50 at 75 percent off. Likewise, Eets Munchies, Klei's 2014 puzzler, is under $2 at 75 percent off.

You'll also find a few games that aren't Klei's. Developer Brace Yourself Games' Crypt of the NecroDancer is $3 at 80 percent off, and Red Hook Studio's Darkest Dungeon is $10 at 60 percent off. Additionally, Slick Entertainment's Viking Squad is $7.50 at 50 percent off. 

This has been a strong week for indie sales. Of the 500-plus games discounted in this week's Steam sale, violent indie darlings Hotline Miami and They Bleed Pixels are clear standouts. There's also publisher Degica's Steam sale, which includes RPG Maker and the criminally overlooked adventure game OneShot. Like Klei's sale, both run through Monday, November 13. 

Dungeons of Dredmor

When we debuted our list of the best indie games in 2017, we said, "Consider this the beginning of a conversation, rather than the final word." We wanted the list to spark discussion among our readers and also to be something we continued thinking about. Great new indie games are arriving every month—by the time we published it Divinity: Original Sin 2 was already becoming a favorite among our writers. There were also plenty of games we voted for that narrowly missed out on the top 25, but which we thought deserved a mention regardless.

That's why we're updating our collection of the best indie games, and will continue to do so a few times a year from now on. The original 25 are still there if you page down, but at the top you'll find some personal favorites that missed out before, and the new hotness. This is supposed to be a list of the best indie games to play right now after all, and these are the games we recommend today. 

Into the Breach

Released: 2018 | Developer: Subset Games

Jody: Turn-based games don't always respect your time—opponents who take forever, entire turns where nothing happens, animations that feel like everyone's wading through stew. Into the Breach does not waste your time, which is apt because it's about time travel.

In the future giant bugs crawl out of the ground and ravage the world, and our only hope are mech pilots from an even more distant future who travel back to save us. As a band of three pilots in vehicles that would make cool toys, you're humanity's last hope. Fortunately, you can see what the bugs plan one turn ahead, and can dodge out of their way so they attack each other or dodge into their way to protect a building full of civilians they were about to demolish. It's a mech vs. monster dance-off.

And it's conveniently bite-sized. Maps are small, load fast, and only have to be protected for a few turns, so it feels worthwhile even if you've only got minutes. With hours to spare you can play a full run, save the day, then take your favorite pilot and leap back into a different timeline to do it all again.

Enter the Gungeon

Released: 2016 | Developer: Dodge Roll

Shaun: Enter the Gungeon is an arcade roguelite about shooting bullets with bullets. In other words, the enemies are ammunition. As one of four distinct characters, you'll dodge-roll, kick furniture and, most importantly, destroy bullets with bullets. There are hundreds of distinct weapons, ranging from a bow and arrow through to guns that shoot actual bees.

Enter the Gungeon exists in an absurdly busy genre: each week I write about a new roguelite. But Enter the Gungeon is special because not only does it nail the essentials (shooting, movement, sheer variety of weapons and items), but it also doesn't complicate things too much. Other arcade-centric roguelites like Flinthook and Rogue Legacy have had a good go at mixing compelling action with a simplified approach to the genre, and while each are great they end up feeling repetitive: like a jumble of the same rooms. But it's the weaponry that keeps Enter the Gungeon fresh. It's also really charming, somewhat against the odds.

Austin: I'd also like to add that there's a gun that shoots guns that shoot bullets.  

Frostpunk

Released: 2018 | Developer: 11 Bit Studios

Chris: It feels strange to play a city-builder that's not open-ended and doesn't let you tinker with your city forever. Also strange is that no matter how efficiently you design your city, your residents may kick your ass out of it due to events that take place elsewhere. But that Frostpunk does things differently is one of the things that makes it great.

Frostpunk is both grim and beautiful, a blend of survival and crisis management that leaves you facing tough choices, sometimes unthinkable ones, as you attempt to build a city that will protect your residents from a world gone cold. You're not just trying to keep them warm and fed, but keep them hopeful, and that's no simple matter when the only thing more bleak than the present is the future. In addition to building, gathering resources, and sending expeditions into the frozen world, you have to grapple with passing laws that may save your citizens' lives but at the same time may erode their freedom. There's rarely a moment that's free of tension and worry, and rarely a choice that isn't second-guessed.

Don't Starve / Don't Starve Together

Released: 2013 / 2016 | Developer: Klei

Jody: Klei's 2013 survival game is a playable Edward Gorey book where you'll probably get eaten by dogs or starve during the long winter—a possibility the name does warn you about, to be fair—while learning how the ecosystem of its unusual world works. You discover the importance of the wild beefalo herd, and the value of dealing with the Pig King. 

And then you do it again, with friends.

The survival games that followed Don't Starve filled their servers with desperate lummoxes all flailing at trees and rocks and each other. Don't Starve Together made multiplayer survival into something that's not as easy to make memes of, but a lot more fun. Sure, you can play it competitively but it's best as a co-operative village simulator where you start by pooling your rocks to make a firepit and eventually you're taking down bosses then crafting statues to commemorate your victory in the town square.

Celeste

Released: 2018 | Developer: Matt Makes Games

Shaun: Celeste is a tough 2D platformer with a 16-bit retro aesthetic. If I had a pixel for every time I’ve written about a game with those descriptors, I’d maybe have enough to render Crysis. So what makes Celeste special? The reasons are many and varied: firstly, it carries itself differently to other deliberately hard platformers like Super Meat Boy and N++. Studio Matt Makes Games wants everyone to finish this game, not just Kaizo Mario World speedrunners, so its pacing is careful and its attitude encouraging. While protagonist Madeline doesn’t have the most novel moveset in a platformer (she can grab certain walls and dash through the air), the action is precise, smooth, and unusually, you’ll actually care about her journey. 

Perhaps the variety is what really elevates Celeste: this is a game with set pieces that aren’t just saved for the boss battles, and while it is fundamentally a series of platform challenge rooms, it does feel like you’re navigating a world (in this case, the mountain Celeste). Not since Shovel Knight have we had a game that manages to cater for players who might not enjoy the irreverent, punishing veneer of most modern twitch platformers.

Rain World

Released: 2017 | Developer: Videocult

Shaun: You're going to hate Rain World if you approach it with the wrong attitude. Firstly, it looks like a platformer, but it's not: it's a punishing survival game. The first hour or so spent in the game also lacks promise: the controls are slightly fiddly because (by necessity—this is a survival game) they aren't as intuitive as most 2D games. You have to learn them (Rain World is all about learning, but you'll still sometimes get unlucky).

Once you surmount these prickly beginnings, Rain World is remarkable. You play as a slugcat one tier above the bottom of the food chain, and you must negotiate a labyrinthine and hideously broken open world in order to survive. Rain World is cryptic, uncompromising, and once given the chance one of the tensest and most atmospheric 2D games I've ever played. If you must make it easier, there have since been options added to the game to allow that. But I wouldn't if I were you. Rain World is determined to wrest empowerment from the player, determined to eschew any shred of the power fantasy so dominant in its medium. And yet it is logical, it's not "unfair", it’s not "poorly designed". It just doesn’t care about you.

Divinity: Original Sin 2

Released: 2017 | Developer: Larian Studios

Jody: My party includes a skeleton who has mastered poison magic, a dwarf pirate, and a fire-breathing lizard prince. By the end of the game, one of them will be a god. 

Plenty of developers have resurrected the bones of the isometric RPG and added modern skin to it, but only a couple of those games really work as both reminders of the old days and great RPGs worth recommending to people who don't have nostalgia goggles near at hand. 

Divinity: Original Sin 2 takes the traditional map-hopping fantasy quest structure and adds a mindbending array of abilities to fill multiple hotbars, sidequests that feel like tonal breaks from the storyline but also seem like they matter on their own, and a degree of characterization we expect from big-budget RPGs. Every party member has their own thing going on, their own plot to follow and life to live, and can replace your character if they die. They can even be selected to take the lead in conversations, although saying hi to people as the skeleton without a disguise on will raise some eyebrows.

Wes: Original Sin 2 has great writing, clever and creative quests, and strong characters with arcs that span a near-hundred hour quest, all substantial improvements over the first game, which was already a hell of an RPG. What I really love about Original Sin 2 is that anytime you ask yourself the question "Can I do this?" you probably can. Savescum to your heart's content to see what happens when you kill an NPC, or sneak somewhere you aren't supposed to be, or figure out how to jump over a wall instead of solving a puzzle. Larian built an insanely open-ended RPG that encourages you to play however the hell you want, and then had the audacity to put a great story and combat system in it, too. 

Devil Daggers

Released: 2016 | Developer: Sorath 

Jody: A one-level first-person shooter where the level is a hellish arena, and the enemies are skulls and flying snakes and other escapees from heavy metal album art. Devil Daggers takes the speed and circle-strafing of Quake and distills it into one perfect minute, or longer if you're better at it than I am. It almost takes longer to describe than it does to play—almost. 

Steamworld Dig 2

Released: 2017 | Developer: Image & Form 

Austin: SteamWorld Dig 2 is a 2D Metroidvania-style platformer about digging tunnels in a fully destructible world. You collect resources, haul them up to the surface, upgrade your gear, and dive back down. As you rack up upgrades, from your pickaxe to gadgets like the grappling hook, jackhammer and steam-powered grenade launcher, you unlock new areas to explore and new ways to explore them. 

It's this magical mix of Metroidvania exploration and the resource collecting that makes survival games so cathartic, and it works because it lets you go at your own pace. You don't just go a little deeper each time you upgrade your stuff; you get a little more adventurous. You start to experiment with different gadgets and use them in new ways, and this changes the way you dig tunnels, which act like scaffolding for getting around levels. And no matter what you do, you're always making progress. Everything feeds into everything else, so you're constantly motivated to dive deeper and discover new temples to ransack. 

Subnautica

Released: 2018 | Developer: Unknown Worlds

Jody: Depending how you feel about diving, Subnautica can be either a wonderful opportunity to explore an alien aquarium or a straight-up horrorshow. Even with the survival stuff turned off so you don't have to regularly grab fish and eat them as you swim past, its depths contain claustrophobic tunnels and beasts big enough to swallow you whole. The thing is, Subnautica works as both a tense survival game about making it day by day in a hostile alien ocean and a way to drift around meeting strange sea creatures (and eating them).

The list continues on page two.

Gone Home

Released: 2013 | Developer: Fullbright

Shaun: Video games aren’t always about mowing down aliens and nazis and trolls in fantasy/sci-fi/post-apocalyptic settings. But most of the time they are. Gone Home wasn’t the first meditative, narrative-driven game, but it arrived at a time when people were more receptive to their possibilities than ever before. Crucial to Gone Home’s success is that, rather than resting on the delivery tactics of film, Fullbright uses the more tactile nature of the videogame medium. Sure, it’s interactive in the sense that you’re wandering through a home and discovering its inhabitants’ stories, but it also asks of the player that they mull over the lives that they’re eavesdropping on. While there are plenty of “walking simulators” nowadays, Gone Home endures because the story it tells is enduringly affecting and important.

Proteus

Released: 2013 | Developer: David Kanaga

Jody: I like walking simulators, and I use the term affectionately, but sometimes I find it hard to get caught up in their stories. They can feel anticlimactic. Proteus doesn't because its story is one I tell myself. It dumps me on a procedurally generated island and lets me explore, climbing hills and chasing frogs. There is another story in it though, in the sense that there's a sequence of events that you can experience, but it's a subtle one. (I'll give you a hint: it involves the standing stones.) If you want it there's a build-up and climax there, but even without that the relaxing strolls over its islands gave me all the satisfaction I needed.

Papers, Please

Released: 2013 | Developer: Lucas Pope

Jody: Games are amazing at letting you experience someone else's life. To pick an extreme example, just like the wriggly controls of Snake Pass give you an insight into what it would be like to be a snake, the rubber stamps and bureaucracy of Papers, Please make you feel like a border guard under a totalitarian regime.Morality's a thing games don't often do well, but by letting you master increasingly complex regulations—Papers, Please has a great difficulty curve, which indie games sometimes struggle with—it gives you power over the hapless citizens who line up to present their documentation. It motivates you to judge them harshly because if you don't, the pay you need to support your family will be docked, but also because the detective work of uncovering fraud is shockingly fun. You discover a contradiction in someone's papers and feel great, then realize what that will mean for the human on the other side of the counter trying to get home and feel awful. Yeah, it's a game about paperwork, but it's so intense that when I was rewarded for my paper-pushing by being given the key to the gun cabinet I wanted to hand it back. I wanted to tell a video game I wasn't interested in its gun.

Austin: I still remember one of the many would-be citizens I turned away in Papers, Please—the old man who repeatedly submits ridiculously inaccurate papers. Sometimes his ID shows the wrong gender or expiration date, sometimes he even has a photo of someone else on ‘his’ passport. His errors get more and more obvious and egregious, but his cheery attitude never changes. Every time I turned him away, he’d just smile and say he’d be back, like I was a server at his favorite local restaurant. Papers, Please is a game about hard choices, but nothing in it made me feel guiltier than denying that old man so many times. 

N++

Released: 2016 | Developer: Metanet Software

Shaun: During my first ecstatic weeks spent with N++, I thought it might be the last platformer I’d ever need to play. The slippery, floaty physics are so expertly tuned, and the level design so varied (despite having upwards of 5,000) that I thought it could keep me busy forever. And while I’ve played probably dozens of different platformers since, N++ is the only one I feel compelled to regularly return to.

Even when you’re not winning, N++ just feels good, and its focus on precision and reflexes isn’t as potentially frustrating as it can be in, for example, Super Meat Boy. The whole game has a zen-like quality, from its austere minimalistic art style through to the experimental electronic soundtrack (one of the few, in a platformer, that I’ve never turned the volume down on). This is simply the best pure platformer you can get on PC, a museum-worthy distillation of the genre’s strengths.

West of Loathing

Released: 2017 | Developer: Asymmetric Publications

Chris: West of Loathing is just so wonderfully jam-packed with humor, clever writing, and charming characters that it's hard to stop playing even when you've finished the main story, solved all of the (sometimes quite devious) puzzles, and collected every hat (there are more than 50) in the game. Everywhere you turn there's some little bit of descriptive text that will make you smile, chuckle, or laugh, even the the settings menu. It's one of the only games that drove me to explore not for loot or experience, but for words.

Crypt of the Necrodancer

Released: 2015 | Developer: Brace Yourself Games

Bo: Crypt of the Necrodancer is a rhythm-based roguelike—a DDR-dungeon crawler, if you will. A head-scratching combination, to be sure, but that's exactly what it is. Dance your way through pixelated depths to the beat of an awesome, rhythmically complex soundtrack. Stay on beat to slay the dungeon's dancing denizens, and don't forget to spend some time with the opera-singing shopkeeper. 

Evan: Definitely give the metal version of the soundtrack by YouTuber FamilyJules (composed by Danny Baranowsky) a listen. It's right up there with the Doom 2016 soundtrack. 

Bastion

Released: 2011 | Developer: Supergiant Games

Jody: There's no game I've had better luck recommending to people than Bastion. Everybody loves its narration and its music, which would be cool independently but become truly outstanding because of how they're integrated. You think you're hearing a beautiful soundtrack and then you discover the musician in the level you're exploring. You think the narrator is a guy with a deep voice telling a story and then he reacts to how you play.

Bastion is an action RPG about a ruined sky-city that rebuilds itself under your feet, nothing beyond the screen existing until you walk toward it. Instead of playing inventory Tetris you choose two weapons from a growing catalogue, and are rewarded for choosing strange pairings with narration snippets and radically altered play. And if you don't like the combat then go into the options and pick a different control scheme. I'm not normally the kind of critic to sing the praises of an options menu but you can turn Bastion into Diablo if you want. Come on, that's awesome.

Her Story

Released: 2015 | Developer: Sam Barlow

Jody: I used to watch an English cop show called The Bill. Back when it was good they'd sometimes dedicate half an episode to an interrogation, a guest star stamping their mark on the show. That's Her Story, only instead of cops it's you, years after the recorded interview, searching through video clips by entering keywords. Her Story plays out in those videos and that search bar, but it's also played on note paper you inevitably fill with conspiracy scribbles like Charlie from It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. I didn't bother making notes during Fez (I probably should have), but for Her Story I scrawled pages. 

It spread even further after that, into an argument with friends about what really happened which I remain convinced I'm right about. Maybe I got obsessed? It's one of a handful of games I 100-percented on Steam and I don't regret it.

Wes: In tech, skeuomorphic design—making your music player in the form of a cassette tape, for example—is now quaint and frowned upon. But it's a rarely used concept in games, and Her Story uses it to great effect. I'd go so far to say that its dusty CRT computer interface is the best marriage of aesthetic and game design in anything I've ever played. It's immersive in a subtle, well-earned way that makes Her Story enrapturing from its first few moments.

Dungeons of Dredmor

Released: 2011 | Developer: Gaslamp Games

Chris: I'm not typically one for turn-based games, and roguelike RPGs often break my heart when I'm forced to start over from scratch, but Dungeons of Dredmor immediately drew me in with its style and comedy. I've never won a game, never beat or even met Lord Dredmor, never even gotten more than a few levels deep. It's still a joy to play for its writing, humor and surprisingly deep and amusing lore.

Evan: The absurdity goes so far to soften the blows of its difficulty. You can build a Vampire Communist who wields Egyptian Magic, Fungal Arts, or Emomancy to fight hordes of weird robots, carrots, genies, and whatever the hell diggles are.

Austin: I keep coming back to Dungeons of Dredmor because it’s a gamble I don’t mind losing. I’ve never beaten Dredmor either, but generating a random character and pushing the usefulness of absurd skills like Fleshsmithing, Killer Vegan and Paranormal Investigator is always a thrill, even when I die on the first or second floor. It’s a system that rewards inventiveness. You can manually select your skills, but rolling the die and making the best of random skills is far more satisfying, and like the optional but actually totally necessary permadeath, makes every round feel genuinely different.

Lovely Planet

Released: 2014 | Developer: QuickTequila

Shaun: You don’t need blood and exploding heads in a first-person shooter. Case in point: Lovely Planet, a first-person shooter where you run increasingly complex gauntlets while shooting cute pastel shapes in a floating pastel land. But how, you ask. How can a game about shooting cute pastel shapes (that don’t bleed!) be fun? Because this is basically a platformer—a more-ish precision-oriented runner combining the fluidity of a Quake speedrun with the one-more-try quick respawn loop of Super Meat Boy. 

DEFCON

Released: 2006 | Developer: Introversion Software

Tyler: DEFCON is one of those games I could play forever. It's a simple, morbid real-time strategy game in which global nuclear war is inevitable and 'winning' means losing fewer people than everyone else. In the early stages it's about placing missile silos (which double as missile defense systems), airfields, radar stations, and fleets of submarines, battleships, and aircraft carriers. As the war turns hot, the only option is to manage losses and inflict your own genocide, to make paranoid alliances and break them with bombs—ignoring that the fallout will kill everyone anyway. The brutality is rendered with War Games-style vectors, turning cities to dots and people to casualty numbers, emulating the calculated viciousness of modern drone wars.

Oikospiel

Released: 2017 | Developer: David Kanaga

James: Oikospiel is a dog opera game about dogs making an opera game. I think. Here’s the plot synopsis according to developer, composer, everything-er David Kanaga: “The Oikospielen Opera is developing an epic global-gaming festival called THE GEOSPIEL, scheduled for the year 2100. The opera's employees, organized by the Union of Animal Workers, are trying to integrate the game dev dogs of Koch Games into their group, but these loyal pups love their jobs and boss Donkey Koch too much! Will there be Unity, or will Multiplicity prevail?” 

It’s as strange as it sounds, and it sounds strange—literally—too. With a soundtrack that mimics its frenzied landscapes, Oikospiel is a touching, psychedelic trip through videogame history with a meaningful message about labor.

The Stanley Parable

Released: 2011 / 2013 | Developer: Galactic Cafe, William Pugh, Davey Wreden

Shaun: Are you playing the game, or is the game playing you? So much of our agency in modern games is illusory, or, more gratingly, reductive and binary. Are you going to go the nice path or the bad-arse path? The Stanley Parable is a meta-critique of gaming as a medium, but it’s also a trojan horse existential crisis (and we all love having those). When we don’t take the critical path, the one prescribed to us, what could possibly go wrong? And given the actual opportunity to do so—given the opportunity to deliberately stray from what a game (or The Stanley Parable’s narrator) is telling us to do, is there any point in playing the game at all? Hmmm. Makes you think.

Jody: First time I played The Stanley Parable I did everything I was told to. Knowing it would be meta-commentary, I rebelled by not rebelling. That’s a dumb way to experience The Stanley Parable for the first time. Don’t do that. Sabotage it, go the wrong way, hide in a closet and refuse to leave. It’s a better game if you break the rules other games have taught you rather than the first rule of The Stanley Parable, which is: don’t do what you’re told.

SOMA

Released: 2015 | Developer: Frictional Games

Shaun: Survival horror too often devolves into repetitive efforts to fend off undead with unwieldy weaponry, but Soma is different. There’s no combat on this underwater research facility, and enemy encounters are few and far between. Most of the time you’re just looking at stuff, but that’s ok in the hands of studio Frictional. They manage to wring an overwhelming sense of dread and despair from a mere dark corridor, not to mention the sprawling sub-aquatic outdoor areas peppered throughout. And the ending of Soma—even if you’re usually ambivalent towards low action horror—is worth the trip alone. It may be more contemplative and less jump scare-oriented than Amnesia, but it’s all the better for it.

James: I’d even recommend those typically averse to horror give SOMA a try. Install the teasingly named “Wuss Mode” mod from the Steam Workshop to make the monsters harmless without losing much horror in the process. Sure, you won’t have to hide, but that doesn’t make their appearance and origins any less terrifying. 

Thumper

Released: 2016 | Developer: Drool

Shaun: Thumper is like an ugly, loathsome, despair-inducing industrial techno song come to life. And that's a very good thing. In our Top 100 Evan described it as "a documentary about the path you take to heaven or hell when you die" which is just about the most alluring description for a video game I've ever read. Yes, it's a tough, precision-oriented rhythm game, but it's a precision-oriented rhythm game that feels like a collaboration between Gaspar Noe and Laibach.

The list concludes over the page.

Nidhogg 2

Released: 2017 | Developer: Messhof Games

Bo: I'm a sucker for local multiplayer games, and Nidhogg is one of the best. Somewhat of a cross between fencing and tug-of-war, Nidhogg's 1v1 matches play out over the course of many brief but violent clashes, resulting in a tense back-and-forth that's every bit a battle of wits as it is one of skill. And like all good local multiplayer games, it's easy to pick up and play but has a well of strategic depth that makes it difficult to master.

The recently-released Nidhogg 2 builds on its predecessor with a new grotesque claymation art style as well as a handful of new weapon types that mix combat up just enough to make things exciting without hampering the original's simplistic greatness. The result is a fantastic fighter we keep coming back to—especially if an office bet needs to be settled. 

Fez

Released: 2012 | Developer: Polytron Corp 

Shaun: Fez accumulates more poignancy with age. It’s a puzzle platformer tightly stuck between two dimensions, and harried by each of them. The protagonist is tasked with investigating and hopefully fixing the scourge of a newly arrived third dimension in a happily two-dimensional world, and this could read, from a fairly one-dimensional point of view, as an indictment on progress, a kind of luddite’s journey. 

But as time passes—as the world becomes more overtly hostile—Fez’s innocent take on the loss of innocence rings true. As time passes, each of us will realise that certain uncomfortable truths have always lingered just out of our sight, waiting to pounce. And others will persevere, dig deeper (whether wisely or otherwise), for conspiracies and better buried secrets (and boy does Fez have secrets). Fez is a game about the hidden regions of our world that are always there, always mysterious, usually forbidding. It’s a beautiful and serene and sad game, but also, as an aside, really fun to play too. Fez is timeless in the way it can convey a wealth of emotion and contemplation through its systems alone.

Wes: After its fairly simple introductory hours, every discovery and deduction I made in Fez felt like a hard earned victory, or the unraveling of an impossibly complex puzzle. I love the sensation of "this can't possibly be the solution" in a videogame, only to discover that my crazy hypothesis was correct. That's what Fez is all about. And I love how clearly you can feel the immense amount of thought and polish that went into it; it feels every bit the intricate, perfectly tuned puzzle someone spent half a decade slotting together, piece by piece, until everything was just so.

Night in the Woods

Released: 2017 | Developer: Infinite Fall

Shaun: Some of the most noteworthy indies from the last decade have been adventure games, but it took until 2017 for one of the highlights, Night in the Woods, to emerge. As endearing feline Mae Borowski, you’re returning to the sleepy rural town of your childhood after an unsuccessful college stint. The town is on the decline, and so too, it seems, is Mae’s future. Things haven’t quite turned out the way she (or her family) had hoped, and much of Night in the Woods is about dealing with this mild disappointment. Exploring the township of Possum Springs is a joy in itself, but it’s the way Night in the Woods weaves a universal coming of age tale around an otherwise straightforward puzzle-laden adventure game that is remarkable. 

Kentucky Route Zero

Released: 2013-ongoing | Developer: Cardboard Computer

Jody: I wanted to wait. I wanted all five episodes of Kentucky Route Zero to be complete before I climbed into it and drove off. That's how I played The Walking Dead, and rumbling through that in one week contributed to its effect. I caved in and played Kentucky Route Zero though because a poet recommended it to me, and that's not something that happens every day. It’s obvious why she thought I had to try it, unfinished as it was (and still is). Kentucky Route Zero’s writing is gorgeous, ornamental but also able to get right at the meat of a thing. It's there when someone calls an office bureaucracy "the paperclip labyrinth" or describes topology as "the science of continuous space".

Kentucky Route Zero is an adventure game of the modern kind, where decisions and dialogue rather than puzzles pace your progress. It's about finding a lost highway, but it quickly buries you in a kind of American mythology where mystery roads are the least strange thing. I'd hate to spoil what you'll find, but if you get in an elevator, see a button that says "third floor (bears)" and aren't tempted to press it, then I don't even know you.

Though it feels like being in a novel, Kentucky Route Zero pays homage to games. That explanation of topology takes place in "a twisty maze of passages", a reference to the classic text game Colossal Cave Adventure. So is the fact that the first item you pick up is a lamp. Some of the earliest PC games were about manipulating words because that was all they had. Kentucky Route Zero is about manipulating words because that's a fascinating thing to do. It's hard to explain why encountering its word-hoard has such a potent effect, but I'm just a journalist. They should have sent a poet.

Stardew Valley

Released: 2016 | Developer: Eric Barone

Bo: There are few games that delight me in the way that Stardew Valley does. I grew up loving the Harvest Moon series, and Stardew takes that formula and applies it to the PC space. Stardew strips away many of Nintendo's puritanical hangups—same-sex marriage and sexual innuendo aren't taboo inclusions, for example—but maintains the charm of tilling fields, planting seeds, and growing crops. There's also a vibrant town to get to know, mines to explore, and tons and tons of fish to fish. I've spent more than 80 hours in Stardew Valley, and I'm looking forward to my next trip to the country. 

James: Do you see me now, dad? You didn’t think my mayonnaise dreams would get me anywhere and look at me now.

Jody: Thank goodness I am not the only person making bank off mayonnaise. The quality eggs provided by my hens, Chickity and Nug, are the secret of my success.

Undertale

Released: 2015 | Developer: Toby Fox

Wes: A friend and I played Undertale in a single sitting. It first inspires curiosity at its quirkiness, then determination to solve its challenging combat without taking the easy way out, then admiration for the delivery of its jokes and the tight meshing of themes and RPG mechanics twisted sideways. Comparisons to Super Nintendo RPG Earthbound, while apt, don't do Undertale justice: it's incredibly smart in how it thinks about the way we play videogames and challenges and surprises with new ideas at every step.

It's a game I genuinely think everyone should play. You'll either appreciate the humor, or the challenge, or the freedom to play through in many different ways, or the painstaking one-off moments, or the ways creator Toby Fox bent engine Game Maker to his will, or the prospect of a "true" ending to earn. It looks simple, but there's so much under the surface.

Kerbal Space Program

Released: 2015 | Developer: Squad

Chris: Whether you're seriously into the science and simulation, or just looking for some fun sending adorable astronauts into space (or watching their rockets explode before they get there), Kerbal is a near-perfect physics sandbox. One of the reasons it's such a joy to play is that there's immense satisfaction in the successes, like the first time you reach orbit, or land on the Mun, or safely bring your astronauts home from a mission, but there's also pleasure to be had (as well as lessons to be learned) from your failures.

KSP is both easy and immensely challenging: rockets can be snapped together quickly, and tweaked or rebuilt in mere moments, but conquering the solar system requires precision and know-how. Its charming looks and its detailed physics simulation make it a game for just about anyone, from casual rocket tinkerers to passionate rocket scientists.

Hollow Knight

Released: 2017 | Developer: Team Cherry

Wes: The best Metroidvania in years, perhaps because developers Team Cherry didn't explicitly set out to make a game in the image of Metroid. They were making a 2D action game, sure, set in a gorgeous hand-drawn decaying bug civilization, but they were mainly concerned with building out an intricate and interesting world, and the rest followed. "The rest," in this case, is a game that feels fantastic to play, with a character who moves exactly as you want and a weapon that hits with a fast and brutal crack. Combat and traversal stay rooted in the basics of jump, dodge, hit, never scaling too far beyond the capabilities you have from the very beginning. It always favors skill over power-ups.

Hollow Knight rarely tells you where to go or what to do, making palpable the satisfaction and wonder of discovering new parts of the world and new abilities. And it just keeps going. The world is huge, more detailed than you ever expect it to be, and suddenly you're two dozen hours deep and wondering how much you still have to find. The Super Nintendo had Super Metroid; PlayStation had Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Hollow Knight may not be spoken of in the same breath, just yet, but before long I think its place in that lineage will be clear: the PC had Hollow Knight.

Darkest Dungeon

Released: 2016 | Developer: Red Hook Studios

Shaun: Ah, dread. It’s what you generally try to avoid in an RPG rogue-like: you want to try to mitigate dread, manage it out of existence. But dread is Darkest Dungeon’s default state. In vague terms it’s a dungeon crawler, but the dungeons aren’t miraculously swept chasms with the odd cobweb and exhumed grave—they’re dank and gross. Add to that, the need to manage your entourage’s sanity (not easy in a game that takes some small inspiration from Lovecraft) and you have an RPG that rarely offers respite. That could sound punishing, but Darkest Dungeon’s mood, and the way that you can invest your emotions in its variables, rather than just your brain and its ability to parse bigger and better numbers, makes for a gripping and bleak RPG.

Evan: I love how martial, not magical, most of the character archetypes are. Apart from the Vestal, there aren't true spellcasters—Darkest Dungeon is acted out in blood, iron, poison, bones, and crossbow bolts. That grounds the game as a whole and adds to its grittiness. The fights that play out, with the help of great 2D camera effects and sound design, feel physical and jarring as a result. It also creates good contrast with DD's monsters, a gang of blood-sucking, spore-sneezing, tentacle-having, spinal column-collecting abominations.

Spelunky

Released: 2008, 2013 | Developer: Mossmouth

Shaun: The first time I played Spelunky I deleted it off my hard drive within ten minutes. Then, later, at the behest of then-PC Gamer scribe Graham Smith’s review, I begrudgingly reinstalled it. I can still remember what hooked me this second time: I picked up a gold mask, a rumble filled the air, and then a massive boulder collapsed through the ceiling and crushed a nearby vendor to death. I laughed, it was funny, I woke my partner up. That’s when I became addicted to Spelunky. 

A lot has been written about the beauty of Spelunky’s interlocking systems, its propensity for creating stories, and its tough-but-fair difficulty. That’s all been said and written a hundred times before, and while Spelunky is still a relatively new game in the wide scheme of things, it feels like a classic. I often boot it up just to be inside of it, just to soak up its mood. It’s weird to seek the comfort of familiarity in a game that’s always throwing curveballs, but aside from the glory of its systems and stories, Spelunky is a really beautiful, heartwarming game. It also was the first to demonstrate to me, personally, that a small game that originated as freeware could contain so much: so many stories, so many events, so many countless, frankly embarrassing, hours.

Evan: I'm gonna use this opportunity to share this great cover of the Mines theme.

Wes: Even years later, Spelunky's spot on this list is well deserved. The way its hero and items and traps and enemies and random generation interact with one another is still peerless. Just as brilliant, though, is Spelunky's daily challenge, the perfect combination of old school arcade leaderboard and infinitely replayable randomized roguelike. The daily challenge added structure and permanence to a genre that prided itself on not having any, and it works; it's become a must-have feature in any similar roguelike ever since.

Don't Starve

Fans of not starving will be pleased to hear that Don't Starve developer Klei Entertainment has unveiled new single-player DLC called Don't Starve: Hamlet. There's also a free content update for Don't Starve: Shipwrecked that's now in beta testing, and a series of new events for Don't Starve Together that will get underway in November with a six-player co-op challenge called The Forge. 

First on the list is Don't Starve: Hamlet, in which the intrepid hero Wilson stumbles upon a lost town of aristocratic Pigmen and decides to pay a visit. "Reacquaint to city life with pig shops, houses, new items, biomes and more, or delve into the ancient pig ruins and try your hand at treasure hunting in this new single player expansion," the Steam page says. As DLC it requires the original Don't Starve, and it's expected to be out sometime in the first half of 2018. 

Don't Starve Together: The Forge will be the first in a series of time-limited game modes "that create a new way to play with the cast of Don’t Starve," Klei explained. "They serve as a way to mix up the experience, allowing us to try crazy new things without breaking the core game. Events are free for everyone who owns DST to play and will be coming in November." 

The Forge will feature new creatures and bosses with their own unique attack patterns, new character traits and combat bonuses, and of course new weapons, armor, items, and combat abilities. Event-specific skins will be up for grabs, and the skin system is being changed up as well: They'll drop far more frequently than they have previously, and if you end up with duplicates you'll be able to scrap them at a new trader, and then craft something else. As well as earning them in-game, players will also have the option to buy a single Warrior Skin Set for $3, or the full collection for $13. Like other skins, they're purely cosmetic, but "purchase of the Warrior Set will help us fund further content and events like this one." 

"We hope that with this mechanism, we can both continue creating great free content while also supporting the development team," Klei wrote. "In addition, this method of funding allows us to provide content to all our players, instead of splitting the player community if we implemented it with a DLC paywall." 

And finally, the free Don't Starve: Shipwrecked content update is available now in a separate beta branch on Steam. Instructions for switching to it are available here, the password is "shipwreckedbeta," and as always when it comes to beta stuff, bear in mind that things could go wrong so dive in at your own risk. There's no word on when it will go fully live that I can see, but here's what it does: 

World:

  • Crockodogs. Will hound you at land and sea.
  • Ballphin followers and the Ballphin Den.
  • Roe. New food item. Stocks the fish farm.
  • Cormorants. New sea bird. Source of Roe.
  • Tar Slick. Pools of crude oil bubbling on the surface of the water.
  • Tar. New resource.
  • 3 new variety of tropical fish.
  • Rainbow Jellyfish.
  • Coral Nubbin. Replant coral after it's mined.
  • Ox will produce offspring.

New Craftables

  • Galley and Sea Lab. Make your base at sea.
  • Sea Yard. Keeps your ship repaired on the water.
  • Tar Extractor. Gets Tar from Tar Slick.
  • Tar Suit. Temporary protection from wetness.
  • Tar patch. A sticky situation.
  • Oil Lamp. Quick lightsource for land and sea.
  • Fish Farms. Grow food on the water.
  • Encrusted Boat.
  • Quackering Ram. New craftable for the Quacken Beak.
  • Sea wall. Water craftable wall. Blocks waves.
  • Tropical Bouillabaisse. New recipe with new tropical fish.
  • Caviar. New recipe with Roe
Don't Starve - Klei-JoeW

Hello everyone!

We’ve been a bit quiet about Don’t Starve in the last few months, but we’ve been hard at work. Today I’d like to announce a few new things that we’ve been working on:

Don’t Starve: Hamlet

The first thing to announce is that we’ve been working on another Don’t Starve singleplayer DLC! Wilson has found the portal to the origins of the Pigmen, and he’s off to explore their civilization. There may be some bushwhacking and tomb raiding involved, too.

Hamlet will be available in Q1/Q2 2018. More information will be shown as we get closer to launch.

You can check out the store page for screenshots and wishlist it here.
http://store.steampowered.com/app/712640/Dont_Starve_Hamlet
Don’t Starve: Shipwrecked Content Update
We have a little surprise for you: Shipwrecked is getting more content! We have added the following to the game as a free update.

In order to test these changes, we’ve put it into a Steam branch called “beta” with the password “shipwreckedbeta”, which is available now. Here are instructions on how to access the beta: http://support.kleientertainment.com/customer/portal/articles/2873712

World
  • Crockodogs. Will hound you at land and sea.
  • Ballphin followers and the Ballphin Den.
  • Roe. New food item. Stocks the fish farm.
  • Cormorants. New sea bird. Source of Roe.
  • Tar Slick. Pools of crude oil bubbling on the surface of the water.
  • Tar. New resource.
  • 3 new variety of tropical fish.
  • Rainbow Jellyfish. 
  • Coral Nubbin. Replant coral after it's mined.
  • Ox will produce offspring.
New Craftables
  • Galley and Sea Lab . Make your base at sea.
  • Sea Yard. Keeps your ship repaired on the water.
  • Tar Extractor. Gets Tar from Tar Slick.
  • Tar Suit. Temporary protection from wetness.
  • Tar patch. A sticky situation.    
  • Oil Lamp. Quick lightsource for land and sea.    
  • Fish Farms. Grow food on the water.
  • Encrusted Boat.
  • Quackering Ram. New craftable for the Quacken Beak.
  • Sea wall. Water craftable wall. Blocks waves.
  • Tropical Bouillabaisse. New recipe with new tropical fish. 
  • Caviar. New recipe with Roe


Don’t Starve Together: The Forge

In addition to the singleplayer DLC, we are also announcing that we are working on a series of events for Don’t Starve Together. DST events are limited-time play modes that create a new way to play with the cast of Don’t Starve. They serve as a way to mix up the experience, allowing us to try crazy new things without breaking the core game. Events are free for everyone who owns DST to play and will be coming in November.

With the Ancient Gateway activated our survivors now find themselves trapped in a hostile world of fire and battle. They’ll need to team up to defeat the Battlemaster’s army and his champion, the Grand Forge Boarrior, if they have any hopes of returning home. Here’s what’s in store in Don’t Starve’s first event, The Forge:

  • 6-player co-op challenge, where the goal is to try and defeat the Grand Forge Boarrior in an arena. The only way to survive will be to work together.
  • New creatures and bosses with their own attack patterns.
  • New character traits for all characters, each with their own bonuses during combat.
  • New weapons, armor, items, and combat abilities to help you survive the onslaught.

Players who participate in the event will also be eligible to earn event specific skins. For the skin system, we are doing several changes:
  • Far more skins will drop for players than ever before (by a factor of 4x or more!)
  • There’s a new trader in town! If you get duplicates, you will be able to break them down to scrap and craft them into event items.
  • The event features event-time skin drops, including the Warrior Skin Set, putting each character in grizzled gladiator-wear.
  • In addition to the chance of receiving them as drops, players will have the option to purchase a single character’s Warrior Skin Set for $2.99, or the entire Warrior Skin Set collection for $12.99.
  • The nature of the skins themselves will not change, they are still purely cosmetic and optional. However, purchase of the Warrior Set will help us fund further content and events like this one.
  • We hope that with this mechanism, we can both continue creating great free content while also supporting the development team. In addition, this method of funding allows us to provide content to all our players, instead of splitting the player community if we implemented it with a DLC paywall.
This is just the first of many experiments we intend to run, and we would love your feedback! We have many ideas for events, and we would love to know what you would liketo see. 

And more!
Besides events, we will also continue working on Quality of Life improvements and bug fixes. 

And finally, a new challenger has arrived in Don’t Starve Together, and she is coming to all platforms and is available on Steam now!

Armed with her indomitable spirit and trusty mending tape, Winona seems to have been plucked straight off the factory line and dropped into the world of Don’t Starve for something or someone’s unfathomable amusement. There may be more to her arrival than it appears, however, as more than a few eyes will be watching the next move of the newest survivor…

Whew, that’s it! Once again, thank you for your support of our games! 

F.A.Q.

When is Hamlet coming?
We estimate Q1/Q2 next year, but as always, we’ll keep working until we feel it’s ready!

Why not sell DLC for Don’t Starve Together instead of skins?
DST is a multiplayer game, and we decided that we want everyone to be able to play, instead of splitting the community. We hope that in this way, we can continue to develop updates for the game while allowing everyone to enjoy it.

When is The Forge being released?
We are aiming to release it this November.

Are the events coming to console?
The events are going to launch first on PC, but we are looking into bringing them to other platforms at a later date.
Uplink

Most patch notes are boring. Fixed a bug that stopped a menu from opening properly. D.Va's Defense Matrix doesn't last as long. Wukong's attack speed is 10 percent slower. That's the usual stuff, chronicling important but dull balance changes across years of a game's life. And then there are patch notes like this: "Added cat butchery." "Made all undead respectful of one another." "Tigerman does not have ears."

That's the good stuff.

Those are the kinds of wonderfully crazy patch notes Dwarf Fortress has given us over the years. Determined to top the absurdity of Dwarf Fortress's bizarre changelogs, I put on my deerstalker, grabbed my magnifying glass, and set out to find the strangest patch notes in the history of PC gaming. These absurdities are the result. 

Rimworld

Alpha 12

  • Colonists will visit graves of dead colonists for a joy activity. 

Alpha 16

  • New alert: Unhappy nudity 

Alpha 17

  • Raiders will no longer compulsively attack doors. 

---

Conan Exiles

Patch 15.2.2017

  • Rhinos should no longer try to walk through players 

Patch 15.2.2017

  • Emus now give less XP 

Patch 23.02.2017

  • Players can no longer use chairs to travel great distances 

Update 24

  • Imps, ostriches and other non-humanoids no longer go bonkers if you hit them with a truncheon 

Update 25

  • Seeing dead people can now lead to great rewards 

Update 28

  • Fixed a small issue where a player in some instances could walk underwater. 

--- 

Rust

Update 149

  • Bucket no longer hostile to peacekeepers 

Update 152

  • Pumpkins only have 1 season (instead of 7) 

August 28, 2014

  • Bald inmate digging grows hair bug fixed 

---  

Terraria

1.2.0.2

  • The game will no longer look for the square root of zero. 

1.2.1

  • Mice can no longer spawn in hell 

1.2.3

  • Red Stucco no longer spreads corruption. 

---  

The Sims 4

02/04/2016

  • Sims carving pumpkins or working at a woodworking table will no longer ignore Sims who die near them. 

02/04/2016

  • Babies will no longer send text messages congratulating your Sims on their marriage, engagement, or pregnancy. 

01/12/2017

  • Confident children will no longer get a whim to practice pick-up lines. 

05/25/2017

  • Babies will no longer change skin tone when they are picked up. 

---  

Don't Starve

January 29th 2013

  • Darts and poop won't magically accumulate at the world origin. 

October 1st 2013

  • You can no longer trade with sleeping pigs. 

November 19th 2013

  • You can properly deploy or murder captured butterflies 

---  

Ark: Survival Evolved

254.9

  • Beers can no longer be eaten by Dinos 

---  

The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion

1.2

  • Taking items from dead owned creatures is no longer a crime 

--- 

World of Warcraft

1.3.0

  • The quest NPC Khan Jehn no longer becomes confused and unresponsive 

1.4.0

  • Roast Raptor now has an more appropriate inventory sound 

2.1.0

  • Fixed an error where some characters appeared to be drinking while standing up 

2.4.0

  • Zapetta will no longer become confused about whether the zeppelin in Orgrimmar is arriving or leaving 

3.1.0

  • Yaaarrrr! now has a detailed tooltip 

--- 

Uplink

1.314 

  • Fixed : Dead or jailed people don't answer their phones 

1.35 

  • Fixed : LAN Spoof progress graphic overflow 
  • Fixed : Time freezing and unclickable buttons on computers running for several weeks

--- 

Everquest

July 10, 2001 

  • Reevaluated the values of the various fish fillets 

--- 

August 15, 2001 

  • The Giant Tree Flayer is now Large instead of Tiny 

December 6, 2001 

  • Fixed a bug that was preventing characters from being bald 

--- 

Two Worlds 2

1.4

  • Horse behaviour - improved 

--- 

Battlefield 1942

1.2 

  • Bots do not jump in and out of vehicles anymore 

--- 

Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic

1.02 

  • Dead party members will no longer show up later in the game. What with thembeing dead and all 

--- 

Black and White

1.1 

  • The word "Death" no longer said when villagers die of old age
  • Creature doesn't become constipated if you punish him for pooing 

--- 

No One Lives Forever 2

1.3 

  • Fixed problems with camera rotation after slipping on a banana 

--- 

Hitman: Codename 47

Patch 1 

  • Dancer in "Gunrunner's Paradise" is no longer confused by dead bodies 
...

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