Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Imagine leading a rebellion against an invading force – as a teenager, no less – then remaining a rallying symbol for your people hundreds of years after the fact. Lautaro, revered among the people of Chile as the Toqui (a war chief or literally translated, “axe-bearer”), defied Spanish Conquistadors, escaped enslavement and cemented his legacy while facing overwhelming odds.

Long before his first encounters with the Spanish (who had trouble pronouncing the native tongue) Lautaro was actually known as Leftraru, or "Swift Hawk" in the Mapuche language. Lautaro lead a relatively quiet early life until the Spanish aggressively colonized Chile at the expense of the indigenous people. With every Spanish fort built, Mapuche territory got pushed further. Eventually, the local populace started pushing back. Lautaro, the son of a Mapuche chief, was captured by the Spanish.

Managing to escape roughly three years later, Lautaro finally did return to the Mapuche.  A council of war declared that Lautaro would serve as vice-Toqui to a powerful warrior known as Caupolican and together, they led an assault on the Spanish forts scattered across their territory.

Today, Lautaro is among the most famous military leaders in Chilean history, considered by many to be the nation's first true General in light of his battlefield tactics. The overwhelming forces of the Spanish did little to slow Lautaro's determination, and his efforts spurred a period of resistance that lasted for nearly three centuries after his passing.



UNIQUE UNIT – MALON RAIDER
The 16th Century brought a Spanish invasion to what is now southern Chile. It also brought horses, which the Mapuche were unfamiliar with before encountering the conquistadors. Their presence on the battlefield forced the Mapuche to adjust their tactics. Partly due to Lautaro’s time enslaved to the Spanish, the Mapuche quickly learned how to use horses, turning one of the greatest Spanish advantages against them. The mounted malón raiders—so named for their retributive attacks on invaders—would launch quick raids to harass an enemy, before leading a responding enemy into an ambush. As a result, this unique Renaissance Era unit gets combat bonuses when fighting near friendly territory and pillaging costs less movement.



UNIQUE STRUCTURE – CHEMAMULL
The Mapuche erected great wooden tombstones to remember their dead. These chemamull are carved from a single log and placed beside a person’s tomb. These “people of wood” stand as tall as a person, crafted as recognizably male or female figures with arms crossed over their bodies.

The Mapuche built these wooden statues to protect the spirits of their loved ones. They believed each statue guarded its tomb and helped to reunite a spirit with its ancestors. Not only do these structures provide culture equal to 75% of a tile’s appeal, later in the game, the Mapuche benefit from a tourism boon thanks to chemamull.

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY – SWIFT HAWK
True to his name, Lautaro (originally “Leftraru” in Mapuche which translates to “Swift Hawk”) found ways to probe and exploit weaknesses in the Spanish Conquistadors’ cavalry. As such, defeating an enemy unit in their own territory decreases the Loyalty of the owning city.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY - TOQUI
As a war chief, Lautaro successfully took the fight to a superior force by rallying the Mapuche people. You’ll get a bonus while combatting civilizations already in a Golden Age. All units trained in cities with an established Governor gain more experience in combat.

Lautaro is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Born among the Scottish aristocracy, Robert the Bruce is best remembered for his stalwart leadership of Scotland during the nation’s war for independence with England in the late 13th century. Robert successfully claimed the throne of Scotland and led his people to victory over the oppressive rule of England. 

Although the details of his early life are uncertain, Robert was born into a line of Scottish nobility and by the time he was 18 years old, Robert was already entangled in the elaborate web of politics surrounding the rule of Scotland.

Following the death of their queen in 1290, Scotland entered an interregnum or gap in governance. Edward I, King of England (known famously as Longshanks), was asked to choose her successor. When he selected John Balliol as the rightful heir in 1292 (over Robert the Bruce’s grandfather), both Robert and his father refused to accept the decision.

Rather than support the newly-crowned King John, the Bruces sided with Longshanks – the English king that chose John in the first place. This found the Bruce family at odds with many of their countryman.

Hearing of an alliance between the Scots and French in 1296, England invaded and dethroned King John – once again, leaving Scotland without a true monarch. Robert finally broke from his father's wishes and sought to align himself with those seeking to revolt. However, it wasn't until 1298 after once again siding with Longshanks at the Battle of Falkirk that Robert truly broke from the English king. After seeing his fellow countrymen defeated, including Sir William Wallace, the time had come for change. When Wallace ceded the title of Guardian of Scotland, Robert was named his successor.

Following a series of purported agreements and broken promises over the future of the Scottish throne, in 1306 Robert met with John Comyn, nephew to prior King John. Comyn was another strong claimant to the throne and potential rival to Robert. The details of their meeting are still debated to this day, but what is known for certain is that at some point the two came to blows and Comyn was killed by Robert. Less than two months later, Robert was named King of Scots by his fellow noblemen.

As King, Robert led Scotland in a prolonged conflict against England that persisted not only through the reign of Edward Longshanks but also that of his son, Edward II. For nearly eight years, Scotland and England volleyed for control of the nation, culminating in the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. By some accounts Robert's forces were outnumbered three to one, yet through clever tactics the Scottish emerged victorious. Suffering thousands of casualties, the battle was an utter humiliation for England and King Edward. With momentum on his side, Robert now pushed back the English in their own lands as well as their territories in Ireland.

When the Pope finally recognized Robert as the true king and sole ruler of Scotland in 1324, England's claims to the country were all but over. By 1327, the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton officially marked the end of what eventually came to be known as the First War of Scottish Independence.

Although he lived to see his homeland free of English rule, on June 7th, 1329, Robert died at the age of 54. Despite the political conflicts that plagued the Bruce family during his formative years, Robert rose to the call of his people, finally shaking off the threat of England after more than a decade of turmoil.



UNIQUE UNIT – HIGHLANDER
The feared and respected Scottish Highlanders were ferocious on the battlefield. In fact, some scholars say that even the Vikings knew to avoid the nation. Starting in the sixteenth century, though, highlanders began trading in their bows for gunpowder firearms. By the 1700s, the Scottish highlands were in constant conflict, be it rebels, criminals or warring clans. King George I ordered the formation of what would be called “The Black Watch”, to help keep the peace. They served so well that by 1739 they were formed into His Majesty’s 42nd Regiment and shipped out to North America. Replacing the Ranger in Civilization VI, this strong recon unit gains a Combat Strength bonus fighting on hill and forest terrain.



UNIQUE STRUCTURE – GOLF COURSE
The true origins of golf remain debated, dating back to the Chinese, Persians and Romans, but we trace the modern game of golf to 15th-century Scotland. One of the earliest written records comes from James II's Act of Parliament of 6 March 1457, which banned golf and football. The reason: It was an unwelcome distraction to learning archery at a time when military training was compulsory for males over 12.

This once-banned pastime provides a number of bonuses for Scotland in Civilization VI. A Golf Course provides additional Amenity, Gold and Culture if placed adjacent to a City Center. It also provides additional Culture when located near an Entertainment Complex. Later in the game, it yields additional Tourism and Housing bonuses. Golf Course tiles can’t be swapped or placed in the Desert and Desert Hills.

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY – BANNOCKBURN
The Battle of Bannockburn was a turning point in the Scot’s fight for independence from England. Estimates vary, but the English force – at least 50% larger than what the Bruce army was able to muster – suffered huge casualties. As a result, Scottish led raids into English territories. This translates into some war bonuses for the Scottish. Robert the Bruce can declare a War of Liberation after gaining the Defensive Tactics Civic. You also gain bonus Production and additional movement during a War of Liberation.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY – SCOTTISH ENLIGHTENMENT
The 18th and 19th century marked a period of great scientific and intellectual achievements for the Scottish people. Discoveries in the sciences, math, literature – to Adam Smith’s “The Wealth of Nations,” which became the foundational economic theory that had immediate impacts for England back then and the modern world, today. Happy Cities receive additional Science and Production. They also generate a Great Scientist point per campus and a Great Engineer point per Industrial Zone.

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Robert the Bruce is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Learn the details of all of the new features being added to Civilization VI in this extensive gameplay preview of the Rise and Fall expansion.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug

What makes an ideal monarch? Is it someone wise and diplomatic? A forward-thinking patron of the arts or a stalwart defender of the realm? Few live up to that standard, but you can count Tamar – ruler of Georgia at the height of its golden age – among them.

Born around 1160 (dates of her birth vary) to King George III and Queen Burdukhan, Tamar would be in for an early fight to keep her crown. The nobles of the court preferred her cousin, Prince Demna, to be next in line of succession and by the time she was 17, a minor rebellion broke out. Those nobles were summarily crushed by King George III.

Tamar was proclaimed heir and co-ruler by her father shortly after that rebellion. When George III died in 1184, Tamar assumed the throne of a fractured Georgia. Compromises needed to be made and Tamar was pressured into accepting the nobles’ choice for her husband: The Rus prince Yuri.

The two were wed in 1185, but the marriage didn’t last. Yuri led Georgian forces to victory in battle, but he was a coarse and unpleasant person, causing all sorts of problems for the royal court. So she filed to divorce him on grounds of drunkenness and immorality. This was monumental considering the era: the monarch of a fervently Christian nation, divorcing her husband and then receiving permission to re-marry from the church? That just didn’t happen back then.

As Tamar left Yuri, Georgia saw the greatest expansion of its domain begin. The Georgians fought against the neighboring Muslim sultanates, aided by exceptional generals (including the new king consort, David Soslan) and conquered them. Nearby kingdoms became vassals and protectorates. Georgian nobles stopped scheming, then began rallying to her banners. Georgians even founded the Empire of Trebizond, injecting themselves into the powers of the Middle East. 

Tamar became the frequent target of marriage proposals after Yuri. After all, she was an eligible queen of a prosperous kingdom. One story tells of how the Sultan of Rum declared war on Georgia, stating he would have Tamar "as a Muslim bride or a Christian concubine." The diplomat sent to deliver this message was summarily punched in the face by a Georgian courtier.

Tamar, always pious, is said to have prayed at the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, then addressed her troops from the steps of the church. Inspired by her piety, the Georgians crushed the Sultan’s forces.

Tamar was also a strong patron of the arts. She bolstered trade and commerce, and minted coins bearing her monogram and titles. Laws were codified. Churches and cathedrals were built. Georgian culture developed as a strong and lively blend of Byzantine Christianity and Persian-inspired ideas.

Tamar is said to have died in 1213, but her grave remains a mystery. Some say she was buried in a monastery, to prevent desecration. Others claim her remains were secreted to the Holy Land, for burial near the Holy Sepulcher.

She came to power in a divided kingdom, and left it larger, more powerful, and sure of its cultural identity. She is canonized as a saint in the Eastern Orthodox faith, and a national symbol for Georgians even today.


UNIQUE UNIT: KHEVSURETI
The warriors from Georgia’s Khevsureti territory maintained their traditions for countless generations. (Until the early 20th Century, they continued to fight with weapons and armor more suited to medieval times.) These fierce Georgians dressed in chainmail and carried swords, axes, and small, black bucklers adorned with crosses for nighttime raids—due to the shield’s color, the warriors were practically invisible in the moonlight. It should come as no surprise that this warrior order gets a Combat Strength bonus, but they also suffer no movement penalties on hilly terrain. Though tradition was their watchword, they did adapt with the times, incorporating firearms as their importance on the battlefield became unmistakable.


UNIQUE STRUCTURE: TSIKHE
Sitting high over the countryside, situated in the hills and rocky cliffs, the Georgian fortresses – or tsikhe – stand guard. A tsikhe features high curtain walls with either rounded or triangular merlons (the solid part of the “cut outs” on the wall used as defensive structures).

The Georgian fortresses were particularly difficult to assault due to their position on the high ground. Unique to the Georgians, it raises the strength of your outer defenses to the highest level while at a lower production cost than Renaissance Walls.

Although this type of fortress existed during the time of Alexander the Great, the Georgians employed them effectively through the 17th Century. And even today, they are a big tourism draw. Once you advance to the Conservation Civic with Georgia, you will be able to benefit from that tourism as well.

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY: GLORY OF THE WORLD, KINGDOM AND FAITH
Tamar can declare a Protectorate War after gaining the Theology Civic. Considering Tamar’s upbringing – and how she was known to inspire her troops before battle, they gain bonus Faith for a limited time after declaring a Protectorate War. In addition, Georgia gains bonuses as they continue to deliver the word of God. An Envoy sent to a city-state of your majority religion counts as two.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY: STRENGTH IN UNITY
Out of a time of relative instability for Georgia, Tamar helped give purpose and unite her people. Honor her achievements through Pride Moments. When making a Dedication at the beginning of a Golden Age, receive its Normal Age bonus towards improving Era Score, in addition to its Golden Age bonus.

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Tamar is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug

Poundmaker (Pitikwahanapiwiyin) was chief during a time of crisis for the Cree. Deeply committed to both peace with the Canadian government and the preservation of his people, he negotiated impossible choices, only to be wrongly accused and tried for treason.

Poundmaker was a highly skilled bison caller – a man who drew bison into pounds – and greatly respected among his people. After all, bison calling had a great practical and spiritual importance to the nation. However, he was also recognized as an outstanding orator and went on to become a great leader.

In 1873, Poundmaker was adopted by the Blackfoot leader Crowfoot at the age of 31. Crowfoot had initiated a peace between the Cree and Blackfoot, bringing to an end an era of bitter wars and feuds. Poundmaker was given the name Wolf Thin Legs (Makoyikohin), and for the next few years lived with the Blackfoot. This greatly elevated his status with both the Cree and the Blackfoot.

Three years later, the Cree were deeply involved in a treaty negotiation with the Canadian government. Poundmaker emerged as a leading skeptic of the treaty, objecting to some of the terms being dictated. He pushed for the inclusion of a famine clause, as well as assistance for the Cree in learning farming and trades. By all accounts, despite his earlier misgivings about the reservations and his reluctance to enter one, Poundmaker made every effort to learn to plough and farm to become self-sufficient, rather than rely on government rations.

In 1881, Poundmaker served as an interpreter and guide for the Governor-General from Battleford to Calgary. The viceregal party was impressed with their guide’s nonviolent philosophy and cultural knowledge. He publicly encouraged his band to remain peaceful during this trip.

This commitment to peace was shortly tested, though. In 1883, short supplies to the reservations and a reduction of the staff of the Indian Department, as well as the terrible winter of 1883-1884 led to starvation and desperation. By June 1884, war bands under young warrior leaders had begun to gather, and many groups, including ones led by the Cree leader Big Bear, assembled on Poundmaker’s reservation for a Thirst Dance ceremony to discuss the situation.

Tensions increased over the next couple years with increasing skirmishes between the Cree and government forces. Then, on the morning of 2 May 1885, Lieutenant-Colonel Otter attacked Poundmaker’s camp, believing Poundmaker to be in rebellion. After a sharp skirmish, Otter and his men were forced to retreat. Poundmaker intervened to prevent the Cree and Stony warriors from pursuing the retreating troops, thus preventing further bloodshed. Poundmaker again intervened when his band captured a column of supplies intended for government forces, preventing the warriors from murdering the wagon drivers.

Upon entering the nearby fort to calm the situation, Poundmaker and his followers were arrested and charged with treason against the government. Sentenced to three years in prison, he was paroled after a year at Stony Mountain Penitentiary. The year in prison had ruined him, physically and mentally, and he died shortly afterwards of a pulmonary hemorrhage, while visiting his adoptive father Crowfoot, on the Blackfoot reservation.

Poundmaker’s historical reputation was restored after his death. His commitment to a lasting, just peace between the Cree and the government was born of foresight and dignity. During his life he had served as a personal agent of peace to end war between First Nations. He had negotiated in good faith and attempted to strike a conciliatory approach with the Canadian government. His legacy is now honored among both the Cree and Canadians today.


UNIQUE UNIT: OKIHTCITAW
Roughly translating to “warrior,” the okihtcitaw had a much more important role within Cree society than merely serving as combatants. The sons of chiefs, they protected the tribe when it traveled and kept order when it settled. They also policed buffalo hunts to ensure that no one hunter began before any other. They make for excellent scouts as well, serving as an early, strong reconnaissance unit. The Cree considered these seasoned warriors incredibly brave and skilled in combat, a step above their peers—often charismatic and clever, allowing them to serve as effective leaders in times of war and peace. That’s why they start with one free promotion.


UNIQUE STRUCTURE: MEKEWAP
Made from birch bark, the mekewap was a long-term shelter for the Cree intended to lodge many people. The Cree carefully laid out the wood into a dome shape, then wrapped wooden strips around the shelter. They then wove the strips together for warmth, further securing it from the elements. This careful construction prevented rain from permeating the shelter.

The mekewap were not portable, but thankfully, they were relatively easy and quick to build. Because it’s relative easy construct and design, the mekewap gives an early advantage to the Cree. When placed near Bonus or Luxury resources, the Cree get Production, Resources, Food and Gold benefits.

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY: FAVORABLE TERMS
Poundmaker’s goals of living in peace with surrounding tribes – and governments – benefits all his allies. All Alliance types provide shared visibility. However, Poundmaker also directly benefits with bonus food and gold from establishing trade routes.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY: NIHITHAW
Depending upon the community, the Cree identify themselves with several different names. Among them, the Nihithaw (or “Woodland Cree”). They had an extensive network of fur trade. As the Cree people explore, they start with an extra trade route and an opportunity to gain control of nearby unclaimed tiles.

Poundmaker is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Master strategist.  Respected diplomat. Honored student. Chandragupta Maurya of India was all of those things and became legend amongst his people because of it. In his time, he toppled a corrupt empire, then succeeded in pushing the boundaries of his kingdom and worked to better the lives of his subjects. Then he voluntarily walked away from it all.

Born sometime in the 3rd Century BCE, Chandragupta’s early life remains somewhat of a mystery. Though some accounts speak of his connection to a family with a noble warrior tradition, other accounts claim he was born a commoner, orphaned at an early age. Regardless, Chandragupta earned a reputation as a clever and charismatic man – so much so that the great Chanakya mentored him. Thanks to the legendary politician and philosopher, Chandragupta received a crash course in politics, the arts, and military tactics.

Ever the masterful strategist, Chanakya had a plan: he hoped his pupil could challenge the Nanda dynasty, a government widely perceived as corrupt. Chandragupta proved worthy of his tutor’s confidence, for he soon raised an army. By 322 BCE he overthrew the Nanda, installed himself as ruler of the kingdom of Magadha, and established the Mauryan dynasty.

Chandragupta next turned to the lands held by the successor-states of Macedon. Although Alexander the Great had perished before Chandragupta’s ascent to the throne, his conquest of the Indus valley needed to be addressed. Chandragupta kept extending his kingdom until he pressed against the newly-formed Seleucid Empire. The Seleucid-Mauryan War, lasting from 305 to 303 BCE, would end with Seleucus ceding Macedon’s Indian satrapies to the Mauryan king. To show there were no hard feelings, and knowing Seleucus cared more about his successor state rivals to his west and south, Chandragupta gifted 500 war elephants to the basileus.

Chandragupta’s empire extended all the way from modern day Afghanistan to southern India. Yet conquest was not Chandragupta’s only strength. Throughout his reign, Chandragupta proved himself a canny ruler who cared for his people. He built roads, irrigation systems, and expanded trade routes to improve the lives of his people. He was also clever enough to ensure the loyalty of his soldiers by providing them finery and servants in their garrisons.

Chandragupta met the sage Bhadrabahu near the end of his life, who taught him the precepts of Jainism, a religion promoting spiritual enlightenment and nonviolence through ascetic living. Following this new code, Chandragupta abdicated his throne to his son, Bindusara. He sought enlightenment, going on a pilgrimage to a cave in southern India. There he meditated until his death, fulfilling his ultimate goal of spiritual purity by giving up literally everything—his throne, kingdom, riches, and even food.

Chandragupta’s death was not the end of his dynasty, though. The Mauryan Empire would last another century. Inspired by his actions, Chandragupta’s successors—especially his grandson, Ashoka—followed his combined examples of expansion and spiritual enlightenment.
 
UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY: ARTHASHASTRA
This ancient Sanskrit treatise is often translated as “The science of politics,” Arthashastra covers much more ground. It’s the Indian framework for how to conduct statecraft, but also economic policy and military strategy. Credited to Chanakya – Chandragupta’s mentor – this is a template for the Mauryan dynasty.  Take advantage of these lessons as you declare a War of Territorial Expansion. You will gain Movement and Combat Strength bonuses as you march into battle.

Chandragupta is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Genghis Khan once demanded two Tug (“Spirit”) Banners: One made of white horse hide for times of peace, and another of black horse hide for all the other times. Upon his death, his soul was alleged to live on in the black banner. This is how the feared “Universal Ruler” of the Mongol Empire lived – and died.

At his birth in 1162 CE, legends tell of a boy clenching a blood clot at birth – a sign that he would one day be a great leader. Born Borjigin Temujin (the later translates as “blacksmith”), scholars say he was named after a captured tribal chieftain as a taunt. At 9, he was betrothed to marry Borte, the daughter of the neighboring Konkirat tribe’s chieftain. Within a year, the boy would be ostracized by his tribe, his father assassinated by the Tartars and by 16 he would kill his half-brother. All the while, his mother Hoelun coached Temujin in statesmanship, influencing allies and controlling enemies.

Temujin began amassing troops in his 20s. It started with his brothers as a fighting unit going on raids of their own. He would gradually build his army until it became a feared 20,000-strong force. Next, he'd go on to defeat the Tartars and exhibit the brutality he would become known for in avenging his father. It didn’t stop there. He ordered the death of every Tartar male above three feet tall.

By 1206, Temujin united the tribes of the steppes. This is when he received the title 'Genghis Khan'. He then proceeded to issue the Yassa, a collection of divine laws governing everything from property to marriage to civil service designating its execution to his second son, Chagatai.

The Yassa would do away with the common causes of tribal warfare, banning the kidnapping of wives and doing away with inherited titles. It also granted religious tolerance to his followers (as long as they recognized Genghis Khan as the final authority).

As he lay dying in his 60s, it has been said that Genghis Khan asked to be buried in secret with his six cats, hoping their purrs would guide him to the afterlife. Legend has it that the funeral escort killed anyone and anything that crossed their path to conceal his final resting place. After the tomb was completed, soldiers had 1,000 horses trample any evidence of his burial site and to this day, it remains hidden. Khan’s black spirit flag continued waving as his third son, Ogedei, would inherit and expand an empire stretching from the Caspian Sea in the west all the way to the East Sea.



UNIQUE UNIT: KESHIG
The Mongolian Keshig (loosely translated as “The Favored” or “The Blessed”) were the elite imperial guard of the Great Khan. Split up into daytime (Torguud) and nighttime (Khevtuul) based troops, these mounted warriors were originally comprised of Genghis Khan’s most loyal fighters. The Keshig were well-equipped, using their composite bows and mobility to harry opponents from a distance. As horse archers, they were second to none. The Keshig served as bodyguards and they are the perfect escort for slower-moving civilian and support units – and can get them to travel at a faster movement rate.


 
UNIQUE IMPROVEMENT: ORDU
“Ordu” means “palace tent.” However, an ordu was something much more than just a simple tent—it was the center of the tribe for the nomadic Mongolians.

An ordu served as the mobile headquarters and main encampment for the Khan and his warriors. Though built for travel, it had style, from simple decorations to carefully sewn patterns. The ordu moved with the Khan and his warriors as they went on campaign, ensuring they always felt at home no matter where they traveled. That’s why ordus grant a movement bonus to light and heavy cavalry.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY: ÖRTOO
Because the Mongol hordes were so quick, the messengers had to be even quicker. The Örtoo served as a supply route system widely used by Genghis Khan and the Khans to follow him. These relay stations provided support for messengers to help speed up the delivery of intelligence information. Think of it as a combat-focused trading route, so take advantage of the Örtoo ability to get a boost in Combat Strength and Diplomatic Visibility over your opponents.

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY: MONGOL HORDE
Genghis Khan’s feared Mongol Horde – and his reputation for utterly destroying enemies – made him legend. With Genghis Khan’s unique ability, all Mongolian cavalry class units gain a combat bonus and a chance to capture enemy cavalry class units to further grow his horde.

Genghis Khan returns in Civilization VI: Rise and Fall. There are a total of nine leaders and eight civilizations coming when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Imagine knowing at four years old that you’re next in line to lead the Dutch. That’s exactly what happened for Queen Wilhelmina, whose rule of the Netherlands began when she turned 18. Queen Wilhelmina saw the dawn of the 20th century, the economic collapse of the 1930s and led through both World Wars.

Her nearly 58-year reign is often remembered for her role maintaining Dutch neutrality during World War I and inspiring the Dutch resistance during World War II. Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom described the young Wilhelmina as pretty, polite, and intelligent, but Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany could attest to her wry wit. During a meeting prior to World War I, the Kaiser commented that his guards were “seven feet tall,” while Queen Wilhelmina’s were “only shoulder high.” She elegantly responded, “Quite true, Your Majesty, your guards are seven feet tall, but when we open our dikes, the water is ten feet deep!” The Netherlands maintained neutrality for the duration of World War I thanks to negotiations with the German Emperor—perhaps he remembered her threat. Despite Dutch neutrality, Wilhelmina supported a strong defense policy throughout the Great War.

The Dutch, well known for their trading, were blockaded by Allied forces by the close of WWI despite their claims of neutrality. Amidst all this, and around the wreckage of the world economy, Wilhelmina’s prudent investments would see her become one of the wealthiest people in the world. At least until Germany invaded the Netherlands on May 10th, 1940.

Queen Wilhelmina declared a “flaming protest” at the attacks on her territory. She fled the Netherlands, taking refuge in England and sending her family to Canada for the war’s duration. Her departure was a calculated rather than cowardly move— if she remained, her people would assume collaboration. Wilhelmina’s departure declared her resistance. Her government-in-exile remained in London until the war’s end, and she encouraged occupied territories to remain strong on Radio Oranje. Spurred on by her words, the Dutch resistance fought on until her return in 1945. 


 
UNIQUE UNIT: DE ZEVEN PROVINCIEN
The Dutch-built De Zeven Provinciën (“The Seven Provinces”)-class ships were not only devastating to enemy ships, but could lay siege to harbor cities. These powerful ships of the line were nearly half the length of a football field (either variety), armed with a minimum of 80 guns spread across two gun decks. They served as the naval backbone of multiple battles in the Anglo-Dutch wars—battles nobody expected a mercantile power to win. Nevertheless, these ships proved the Dutch could hold their own against other (presumably) mightier naval powers.



UNIQUE IMPROVEMENT: POLDER
The Dutch are respected not just for their trade empire, but for their ingenuity as well. Polders are low-lying land tracts encircled by dikes. The only way water enters the area is through manually operated devices. They result in land reclamation efforts, creating flood plains separated from the sea and drainable marshes. While there are obvious benefits like extra land to grow food and increased production, Polders also served a military purpose. As Wilhelmina alluded to Kaiser Wilhelm II, opening the sluice gates at high tide and sealing them at low tide created an inaccessible swamp the German army couldn’t cross during WWI.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY: GROTE RIVIEREN
Literally translated – “Great Rivers” refers to waterways that have been a natural dividing line across the Netherlands. These rivers formed the boundaries between states and even served as a way to mark the edges of empires. The navigable rivers and canals built around them were the foundation upon which the Dutch built their culture – and massive mercantile fleets. That’s why the Netherlands gain major adjacency bonuses for Campuses, Theater Squares and Industrial Zones if near a river. 

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY: RADIO ORANJE
 Wilhelmina broadcast a voice of resistance for the Dutch during WW II – “Radio Oranje” – inspiring her people from afar. Since the Dutch are world-renown for their trade routes and merchant ships, put them to good use with Wilhelmina’s ability. After establishing trades routes to and from foreign cities, you’ll gain Culture bonuses.

Wilhelmina is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases on February 8, 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Long before Seondeok was crowned Queen of Silla (now Korea), legends tell of her being incredibly clever. That insightfulness made her a diplomat to be respected and a strategist to be feared.

With no male successors, Seondeok became the rightful heir after King Jinpyeong’s death in 632. This lead to infighting and some outright rebellions – the notion of having a Queen instead of a King didn’t sit well with some factions.

One revolt leader claimed that a falling star signaled Seondeok wasn’t fit to lead. That it was a sign of the end of her reign. The Queen’s solution: Fly a burning kite high in the night sky to signal that the star is back in its place.   

All the while, she still set about major projects to improve the lives of the Sillan people. Welfare policies were put in place to help the most impoverished citizens. She invested heavily in education, allowing knowledge in the arts and sciences to flourish during her rule. Seondeok commissioned the Cheomseongdae, an astronomical observatory to be built in Silla’s capital. It’s no wonder that Seondeok’s big in-game bonus is for science. And while Buddhism was already the state’s religion, she integrated it further into society, refurbished old temples and broke ground on many new ones.

The Queen did all this during her 15-year reign while also fending off neighboring kingdoms. It was through her ability to balance shrewd diplomacy with threats of force when needed that she even accomplished what some would think impossible: Forging an unlikely alliance with Tang Dynasty China.

Seondeok not only managed to get China to support Silla militarily, she also rejected stepping down for them to rule in her stead. While she didn’t live to see it, Seondeok put pieces in motion to let Silla thrive by pitting neighboring kingdoms against each other…and getting one step closer to a united Korea.



UNIQUE DISTRICT: SEOWON
Replacing the Campus district, the Seowon is home to many academic endeavors. Built into the hills, they functioned as both Confucian shrines and scenic preparatory schools in 16th Century Korea. Seonbi (intellectual aristocracy during the Joseon Dynasty) sympathized with the commoners’ plights and this philosophy found its way into the Seowons – attended largely by aristocratic children. These academies became ideal places to discuss politics and explore new ideas regarding Neo-Confucianism, Korea’s contemporary culture and government.



UNIQUE UNIT: HWACHA
The hwacha is an unassuming two-wheeled cart, but this mobile ballista was deadly in the defense of Korea. A hwacha could launch a hundred rocket arrows against distant targets in seconds. Or, with a changeable module, fire off 200 Chongtong bullets.

Hwachas are considered to have turned the tide of the Imjin War. From 1592 – 1598, hwacha were widely used to aid in repelling Japanese invasions – roughly 50 units deployed in Hanseong (modern day Seoul) and another 80 along the northern borders. The most telling victory came during the Battle of Haengju where Korean soldiers beat back a force ten times its size thanks to 40 hwachas.

UNIQUE CIV ABILITY: THREE KINGDOMS
Korea’s unique ability is called “Three Kingdoms” and to make the most of it, be sure to build mines and farms adjacent to a Seowon. Mines receive bonus science and farms will yield bonus food from this placement.

UNIQUE LEADER ABILITY: HWARANG
Seondeok improved the lives of her subjects through education. Take advantage of that with Hwarang. It grants players a bonus to both science and culture in all cities with an established governor.

Seondeok is one of the nine new leaders coming with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall when the expansion releases in early 2018.

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Sid Meier’s Civilization® VI - 2kschug


Civilizations are not set in stone. You can’t just do all the hard work in the beginning then expect your culture to stand the test of time, unchallenged. It’s not like that in the real world – or in Civilization games. The expansion we’re announcing today, Civilization VI: Rise and Fall, adds new dynamic layers onto the game you’ve already been enjoying. On February 8th 2018, you will lead nations to golden ages. You will watch others buckle under their own weight. You will earn – or lose – the loyalty of your people. The question is, “How will you be remembered?”

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I’m Anton Strenger, Lead Designer for Civilization VI: Rise and Fall, and today we’re revealing some of the big changes coming with this huge Civilization VI expansion. The biggest, over-arching goal: dynamic empires. Civilizations will rise and fall through the course of the game (as you probably figured out from the title). Borders will ebb and flow. Cities will change their loyalties.

As a secondary goal, Civilization VI: Rise and Fall includes more storytelling elements – Historic Moments – that highlight the interesting turning points in your civilizations. These events happen every time you play, making playthroughs unique, while also giving them meaning in the mechanics.

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GOLDEN – AND DARK – AGES ARE COMING
Golden and Dark Ages are among the new events that can shift the course of your game’s history. They are significant, but temporary, changes to a civilization that last for an Era. They will open up new opportunities for players to change their strategies, and change the state of the game between the player and their rivals. Having a Golden Age affords huge bonuses to Loyalty and other game systems, but makes earning future Golden Ages slightly more difficult.

Having a Dark Age hurts Loyalty in your cities and makes you vulnerable, but gives you an opportunity to earn a future Golden Age more easily. It also allows the use of special Dark Age policies and opens the door for an even more powerful Heroic Age. Think of it this way: While a Golden Age provides one Dedication bonus (a powerful Golden Age effect), being in a Heroic Age lets the player earn three Dedication bonuses (making it sort of a “triple” Golden Age).

In the Civilization VI base game, we have the idea of a “player era” – how far a player has advanced on their tech or civics tree. In this expansion, systems are very much tied to the idea of the “game era,” which is determined by individual player advancement and a few other behind-the-scenes adjustments. Think of these game eras like chapters in a book. Each has its own arc, and its own small ending, but leaves you wanting to discover the rest of the story by continuing to the next chapter. When you enter a new game era you may earn a Golden Age or a Dark Age. Which one you get is determined by your Era Score in the previous game era, a score that is increased by fulfilling certain objectives.

So while your neighbor may have been in a Golden Age last era, they may enter a Dark Age this era, opening up an opportunity for you to change your strategy. The key effect of Golden and Dark Ages: they change the Loyalty of a player’s cities. As Ages change and weak spots are exposed in empires, cities can declare independence and even change hands to new owners.



EARNING LOYALTY
The stakes of the new Loyalty system are huge because, at the extremes, it can flip control of entire cities to different players without military force. Low Loyalty in a city puts it at risk of rebelling and becoming a Free City. That, in turn, makes it a juicy target for other players looking to expand their own empire. Keeping your cities loyal not only keeps it on your side, but also emanates its Loyalty as a kind of “peer pressure” to other cities nearby. You could even sway cities from other civilizations to join you.

In previous Civilization games, there were ways to “Culture Flip” another player’s city without military intervention. We felt it was time to reexamine this non-militaristic way to change borders, and expand territory.

Loyalty also changes the landscape and strategy around the map as the game continues. What could have been an unchanging border between two civilizations in the base game becomes a contentious battleground of loyalties in the expansion, especially when Golden Ages or Dark Ages are involved.

Golden Ages and Dark Ages are a kind of loyalty bomb. In the best-case scenarios, triggering a Golden Age makes all of your citizens a little bit more loyal. Also, other cities nearby see the appeal of that civilization and may waver in their Loyalty to their current owner. The quickest and most direct way to boost Loyalty, though, is to send a Governor to the city.

GOVERNORS RULE
In previous versions of Civilization, “governor” often referred to the AI behavior you could set for a city to act on your behalf. In this expansion, though, they are the opposite. Sending a Governor to a city is a way for the player to make an active decision about the development of one of their cities, and grow in a specific direction. Much like how districts operate in the base game, Governors are a way to specialize your cities. The difference: Governors have their own set of unique powerful bonuses and can move between controlled cities.

During a game, players can earn up to seven Governors. Each Governor has a different skill tree of promotions. We bent a lot of existing game rules to give them the power to make a difference in your cities.

Here’s how it works: You earn points (Governor Titles) through gameplay. Then you must choose whether to spend those points on appointing a new Governor or promoting an existing one. How you choose to manage your Governors will impact your overall strategy. Go wide by covering more cities, or go tall by promoting only a few powerful governors.

As for the Governors themselves, they have unique personalities – even before you start choosing which ones to upgrade. Some thrive in taking an already established city to the next level, building Wonders and powering up trade routes. Others are more suited to new cities that are constructing their first districts and claiming their first bits of land. One can be a savior during a city siege, and can make or break a city’s defense against a powerful attacking army. Though normally Governors can only work in your own cities, there is one that can be assigned to city-states, affecting the Envoys you have there. That said, none of the Governors are easily distilled into a single function.



ENHANCING YOUR ALLIANCES
Alliances within Civilization VI already offered a lot, but this expansion adds more nuance. Alliances in the base game often boiled down to a sort of guarantee that the other player would not interfere with your strategy by attacking you, but only rarely did it offer tangible benefits. So for Civilization: Rise and Fall we added more tangible incentives to Alliances. We’re encouraging players to band together for mutual benefit rather than merely non-interference. We’re also giving players more active and flavorful choices to make. Alliances now have a type – Research, Military, Economic, Cultural, or Religious – that determines their benefits. Moreover, as the Alliance continues, the Alliance itself levels up and unlocks more powerful bonuses. This encourages players to think in the long term and to invest in diplomacy.

Let me give you an example of how an Alliance can evolve over time, specifically a Research Alliance. At Level 1, both allies receive Science bonuses to their Trade Routes. But as the Alliance develops, powerful and unique effects come into play. At Level 2, both allies still receive their Science bonuses, but also receive 1 Tech Boost at a regular interval. Level 3 is all of the above, plus bonus Science when researching the same Technology, or a Technology your ally had already researched. These alliances are powerful enough that players are restricted to just one Alliance of each type at a time. But you and your Alliance partner can agree to change the type of your Alliance later in the game.

EMERGENCY SITUATIONS
Emergencies are new with Civilization VI: Rise and Fall. Most Emergencies get triggered when one player gets a significant lead or advantage in an area. Converting a Holy City to a different religion, or using a nuclear weapon, for example. When triggered, the game determines which other players can join in an Emergency against the target and each player can choose to join or pass. Joining can give permanent benefits, but only if the players are able to complete an Emergency-specific objective against the target in time, otherwise the target gets a benefit instead.

They are a sort of checks-and-balances system. You see, there is a delicate balance to strike – making the game more dynamic and also ensuring it stays fair for players who have developed a strong lead. We’re adding challenges to players who’d get so far ahead of others that the game stagnated towards victory for them. We also did not want to artificially rubberband them down. Emergencies become a great way to attack this game-pacing problem. It also reveals the dynamic world stage for players that have more isolationist play styles. As Emergencies come up, they can be involved with them one way or another.

RETELLING YOUR HISTORY
Fans of Civilization know that each game plays out in its own way, with its own unique story. With Civilization VI: Rise and Fall, we are bringing that story into the spotlight by adding more ways to track the progress of a player’s civilization than ever before.

So as players progress in Civilization: Rise and Fall, they earn Historic Moments. These are mini-achievements for doing cool things in the world (and there are over 100 of them in the game right now). They include things like circumnavigating the world, training your unique unit, founding a religion, and building districts with high adjacency bonuses. Many grant an even bigger bonus if you’re the “world’s first” civilization to make the achievement. These Historic Moments, taken together, form a story for your game with unique details tailored to your empire.

Historic Moments are represented two ways. First, they increase your Era Score, helping you achieve a Golden Age. Second, they are added to your Timeline, which is a place in the UI that displays all your accomplishments in a game. This Timeline has tons of custom illustrations for each different moment, and is a very cool representation of your empire’s history during your unique game. On a more practical note, it is also a useful way to remind yourself of what you have been up to if you return to a saved game after a few days away. Ultimately, the Timeline is a way to illustrate your story.



NEW CIVILIZATIONS, NEW LEADERS
People often ask how we select new leaders and civilizations to include in expansions – and we have nine new leaders and eight new civilizations which will be revealed over the coming weeks with Civilization: Rise and Fall. Well, it is a collaborative process that involves the whole team from art and design to production and even our legal department. We also ask ourselves some core questions as we select potential leaders:

“Is this region of the world represented?”
“Is this time in history represented?”
“Is this represented/revered in previous Civilization games or totally new?”

We strive to have a diverse and varied selection of leaders, and it is also very important to us to include female leaders. Women are often underrepresented in traditional historical accounts, and recent scholarship has revealed more and more the fascinating and powerful women that lived between the lines of history textbooks. We also look for leaders whose history makes them particularly well-suited for a bonus related to new expansion systems.

As for balancing and trying to minimize power creep among those new leaders, we take a holistic look at the state of the game and how our leaders, new and old, stack up in it. Our QA department regularly gives us their evaluations of who is on top and who is on bottom, in their estimations of strength. We look at fan evaluations and rankings in this process, as well. We are not afraid to go back to leaders we have already finalized and rework their bonus entirely – so keep telling us what you think about leaders. We are always listening.

This is just the start of what’s coming in Civilization VI: Rise and Fall. We have lots more to share before this expansion releases on February 8, 2018 that we can’t wait to tell you about – starting with all the new leaders and civilizations you’ll get to rule.

Follow the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #OneMoreTurn, and be sure to follow the Civilization franchise on social media to keep up to date with the latest news and information on Sid Meier’s Civilization VI.

Social Links:
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