PC Gamer
Renegade X


I'm starting to think PC gaming might be dangerous to humanity's long-term survival. Hearing Renegade-X's soft-spoken AI announcer just gave me a nostalgic shiver of childhood days spent building tanks and targeting Ion Cannons. That's a powerful weakness for future robot armies to exploit in their inevitable campaign to enslave us all. Until that dark day arrives, we can at least busy ourselves with a free, tactical multiplayer shooter. The C&C inspired FPS has now entered open beta.

It's a timely release. With Titanfall offering a fresh take on the all-out arcade action shooter, Renegade-X should be a welcome diversion for those after a more tactical experience. A spiritual successor to Westwood's C&C: Renegade, its main mode - Command and Conquer - tasks players with destroying their enemy's base, while also defending their own. Rather than a single defence point, each building of the base serves a different function, from charging special weapons to powering team bonuses.

To download the game, and to find some useful tips to start you playing, head over to the official Renegade-X site.

PC Gamer
Battlefield-4

DICE announced today that it will finally begin rolling out Battlefield 4 s Platoons feature on February 27. Similar to the feature in Battlefield 3, BF4's platoons will allow you to create (if you have a high enough rank) or join clans of up to 100 members, and coordinate battles for you and your teammates.
Each Platoon has a private and public feed where members can communicate, coordinate and group before joining servers. All members get a customized Platoon emblem and tag, and basic Management tools allow you to invite, apply, and promote or demote members. If four or more members are playing on the same server, they can rank up their Platoon. Initially there will only be 10 ranks, but DICE said more will come.
It is important for us to clarify that this is the first iteration of Platoons, DICE says on its official blog. We will continue to work on the feature to refine and expand it, but now we will finally have the opportunity to see it in action and get some real-world feedback. Now is the time for all our players to tell us what they like, what they want improved, and what they want to see next.
DICE says that the feature will roll out in stages, with some players getting access before others in order to ensure stability. Everyone can join a Platoon, but you ll need a Premium membership and a rank 10 soldier to create your own. Platoons are also completely platform agnostic, so you can add members from both the PC and console version of the game.
PC Gamer
world of warcraft


Last year, Blizzard announced that World of Warcraft players who buy the Warlords of Draenor expansion could boost one character to level 90 for free, and that it would sell further boosts for an undisclosed amount. Last week, as patch 5.4.7 went live in North America, players saw the service in the in-game store for $60. Blizzard hasn't confirmed that this is the final price, but today said it doesn't want to devalue the accomplishment of leveling.

"In terms of the pricing, honestly a big part of that is not wanting to devalue the accomplishment of leveling," World of Warcraft lead encounter designer Ion Hazzikostas told Eurogamer. "If our goal here was to sell as many boosts as possible, we could halve the price or more than that make it $10 or something. And then hardly anyone would ever level a character again.

We pointed out this problem when we first heard of the $60 price tag. On the one hand, Blizzard probably wants to get players with multiple characters to endgame content faster, without having to resort to third-party leveling services. On the other hand, if it makes the boost too cheap, players won t have motivation to play through hundreds of hours-worth of content.

"I am not an economist, Hazzikostas said. I'm not the one setting the dollar value myself, but it's not the profit maximizing price. That was not our aim here."

We've reached out to Blizzard for comment.
PC Gamer
videoball-teaser


It's been two weeks since I played Videoball, and I still think about it at least once a day. The game has been playing on repeat in my brain for two reasons. One: it's that addictive sort of fun that makes you want to play just one more round. Two: Videoball and some other games coming out this year, like Hokra and Towerfall, have me more excited than I've ever been about local competitive PC gaming.

Videoball's designer Tim Rogers calls it "an abstract minimalist electronic sport," and an early trailer for the game describes it as "casual enough for a child's birthday party, hard enough to televise in prison." Both of these statements sound silly, but they're also true. Videoball is one of those games that you look at and go "Hmm. Okay. Looks fun, I guess?" And then you play it, and you go "Oh," and then you don't want to stop until you've mastered it.

I knew I liked Videoball's minimalist aesthetic and peppy music and chirpy sound effects, but had no idea how it would really feel to play. Textures are nowhere to be found in Videoball the art is all solid colors and basic geometric shapes. The "players" on the field are simple triangles that harken back to the ship from Asteroids. The ball, which you try to knock into the other team's endzone, is a simple circle. Blocks, which are used to block the ball, are simple squares.

"Oh" was the response I had once I played Videoball, because I realized its minimalism extends beneath its colorful skin. Minimalism is the guiding force behind Videoball's design, and the game wields simplicity like a machete. Its controls (a single analog stick handles motion, a single button does everything else) and straightforward goal (knock a ball into the other team's endzone) slice away the hundred hour learning periods of competitive games like League of Legends.



"It started out as a dare between my friend Bennett Foddy who made the game QWOP," Rogers said. "We were talking about making minimalist, one button Starcraft. I must've made 40 or 50 prototypes of one button Starcraft...none of those turned into anything that I would be willing to show anyone else. So then it's like, well, why not put an analog stick in there? Why not make it so you can move the thing around?"

That's more or less how Videoball became a minimalist sports game, though Rogers noted that it played more slowly at the start more like a strategy game and morphed into the fast-paced game we played.

Or, as Tim Rogers explained through analogy, "There's a fine balance between making this game Mario Party-ish and making it Bomberman-ish. Making it friendly to somebody who just wants to party, and friendly to somebody who wants to get real mad at a party."


It's all in the reflexes
After a couple minutes I knew how to play Videoball, and I also knew that its simplicity leads to a deep competitive game ruled by timing and strategy, not complex mechanics. A single second's action or deliberate inaction can make a massive difference in Videoball. Every second you hold the action button, your little triangular player charges up a shot. A piddly level one shot will barely move the ball. A level two shot is like a solid kick. A level three shot is a slam that can knock a ball across the entire field. Hold the button for one more second after the level three shot, though, and your pulsing slam charge morphs into a defensive block you can't hold onto the button and keep a powerful charge built up indefinitely.

The one second that passes between charging a slam shot and letting it transform into a defensive block that's the game. That one second is Videoball.

Every strategic option in the game plays on that tight timing. Do you want to fire a level 2 shoot to knock the ball away from your opponent? Or wait until they fire and try to reflect the shot with a shot of your own, redirecting the ball's momentum? Do you fire a level 3 charge without being in a good position, hoping to knock the ball into an enemy (contact with the ball stuns you briefly) or try to get into a scoring position before the charge turns into a block? Do you position yourself on the back half of the field to play defensively and spawn blocks in front of your goal, or do you stay on the enemy's half of the field?



"We see a lot of basketball strategy happening, where you have someone being center or forward," Rogers said. "I'm talking about three-on-three... you'll see players start to play horizontal lines, along the bottom and the top, trusting each other. You'll see players start playing zones."

I played two games of Videoball two-on-two. The first game, two of us were learning. My team won 10-9 in about six minutes. In the second game, we started to grasp the basics of Videoball strategy, and played with only one ball on the field instead of two. My team won that game by a wider margin. But it took 20 minutes.

"Usually the games are over in about three to five minutes," Rogers said. "We had a two ball game on Sunday go to 22 minutes. And that's with people who've played the game over 100 hours each. We've had one ball games go to an hour. You start to see people stop releasing level 3 shots from their own zone due to the danger of it being reflected."

Even in an unfinished state Videoball still has art polish to add, a soundtrack to expand, varied arenas to include, online play code to implement I think the game has taken on the form of any successful sport. It supplies a field, simple rules, and straightforward mechanics. Player skill and strategy fill in the rest, like they do in football or basketball.
Bringing competition into the living room
When we talked, Rogers casually mentioned that Videoball can support more than six players, though three-on-three was the limit in the build we played. I don't know whether the final build of the game will allow for four-plus person teams, but I hope so.

The idea of four-on-four Videoball excites me, but it also highlights a longtime PC gaming weakness: local multiplayer. Since the Nintendo 64, consoles have supported four players on a single system. That doesn't work on a keyboard. Instead, the PC focuses on online gaming, which is great better, for real-time strategy and games like Counter-Strike but playing online is an alternative to playing together on a couch, not a replacement.

These days, most PC gamers have at least one controller in the house. But four? Or eight? That's a $100-$200 investment, and until now there's been no reason to take that plunge. I think 2014 is the first year those extra controllers will be worth buying. Videoball is only one reason.

Hokra's minimalist sport aesthetic is even simpler than Videoball's.

Hokra, part of the Sportsfriends bundle planned for release on Steam in the spring, is another. Like Videoball, it's an abstract sports game that takes a few seconds to learn and then opens up to endless player strategy. The one-on-one tension of Nidhogg, which we loved, and the four-player chaos of Ouya darling Towerfall, coming March 11, are two more strong arguments for local competitive gaming.

SteamOS, Steam Machines, and in-home streaming finally provide an opportunity to bring the PC's thriving indie game scene into the living room. These games can take over parties and justify having four controllers around (one Xbox 360 wireless receiver, by the way, can sync with four controllers). There are still hurdles, like in-home streaming lag and the cost of buying a second computer for the living room. But for indie developers making small games like Hokra and Videoball, the PC represents an open platform without the challenges or costs of publishing on a console. And that means we're going to keep getting more of their games.

For the first time it's actually practical to play multiplayer PC games in the living room, and there's a growing list of competitive games offering a good reason to do so. When it comes out hopefully in June I think Videoball's going to be at the top of my list.
PC Gamer
videoball-teaser


It's been two weeks since I played Videoball, and I still think about it at least once a day. The game has been playing on repeat in my brain for two reasons. One: it's that addictive sort of fun that makes you want to play just one more round. Two: Videoball and some other games coming out this year, like Hokra and Towerfall, have me more excited than I've ever been about local competitive PC gaming.

Videoball's designer Tim Rogers calls it "an abstract minimalist electronic sport," and an early trailer for the game describes it as "casual enough for a child's birthday party, hard enough to televise in prison." Both of these statements sound silly, but they're also true. Videoball is one of those games that you look at and go "Hmm. Okay. Looks fun, I guess?" And then you play it, and you go "Oh," and then you don't want to stop until you've mastered it.

I knew I liked Videoball's minimalist aesthetic and peppy music and chirpy sound effects, but had no idea how it would really feel to play. Textures are nowhere to be found in Videoball the art is all solid colors and basic geometric shapes. The "players" on the field are simple triangles that harken back to the ship from Asteroids. The ball, which you try to knock into the other team's endzone, is a simple circle. Blocks, which are used to block the ball, are simple squares.

"Oh" was the response I had once I played Videoball, because I realized its minimalism extends beneath its colorful skin. Minimalism is the guiding force behind Videoball's design, and the game wields simplicity like a machete. Its controls (a single analog stick handles motion, a single button does everything else) and straightforward goal (knock a ball into the other team's endzone) slice away the hundred hour learning periods of competitive games like League of Legends.



"It started out as a dare between my friend Bennett Foddy who made the game QWOP," Rogers said. "We were talking about making minimalist, one button Starcraft. I must've made 40 or 50 prototypes of one button Starcraft...none of those turned into anything that I would be willing to show anyone else. So then it's like, well, why not put an analog stick in there? Why not make it so you can move the thing around?"

That's more or less how Videoball became a minimalist sports game, though Rogers noted that it played more slowly at the start more like a strategy game and morphed into the fast-paced game we played.

Or, as Tim Rogers explained through analogy, "There's a fine balance between making this game Mario Party-ish and making it Bomberman-ish. Making it friendly to somebody who just wants to party, and friendly to somebody who wants to get real mad at a party."


It's all in the reflexes
After a couple minutes I knew how to play Videoball, and I also knew that its simplicity leads to a deep competitive game ruled by timing and strategy, not complex mechanics. A single second's action or deliberate inaction can make a massive difference in Videoball. Every second you hold the action button, your little triangular player charges up a shot. A piddly level one shot will barely move the ball. A level two shot is like a solid kick. A level three shot is a slam that can knock a ball across the entire field. Hold the button for one more second after the level three shot, though, and your pulsing slam charge morphs into a defensive block you can't hold onto the button and keep a powerful charge built up indefinitely.

The one second that passes between charging a slam shot and letting it transform into a defensive block that's the game. That one second is Videoball.

Every strategic option in the game plays on that tight timing. Do you want to fire a level 2 shoot to knock the ball away from your opponent? Or wait until they fire and try to reflect the shot with a shot of your own, redirecting the ball's momentum? Do you fire a level 3 charge without being in a good position, hoping to knock the ball into an enemy (contact with the ball stuns you briefly) or try to get into a scoring position before the charge turns into a block? Do you position yourself on the back half of the field to play defensively and spawn blocks in front of your goal, or do you stay on the enemy's half of the field?



"We see a lot of basketball strategy happening, where you have someone being center or forward," Rogers said. "I'm talking about three-on-three... you'll see players start to play horizontal lines, along the bottom and the top, trusting each other. You'll see players start playing zones."

I played two games of Videoball two-on-two. The first game, two of us were learning. My team won 10-9 in about six minutes. In the second game, we started to grasp the basics of Videoball strategy, and played with only one ball on the field instead of two. My team won that game by a wider margin. But it took 20 minutes.

"Usually the games are over in about three to five minutes," Rogers said. "We had a two ball game on Sunday go to 22 minutes. And that's with people who've played the game over 100 hours each. We've had one ball games go to an hour. You start to see people stop releasing level 3 shots from their own zone due to the danger of it being reflected."

Even in an unfinished state Videoball still has art polish to add, a soundtrack to expand, varied arenas to include, online play code to implement I think the game has taken on the form of any successful sport. It supplies a field, simple rules, and straightforward mechanics. Player skill and strategy fill in the rest, like they do in football or basketball.
Bringing competition into the living room
When we talked, Rogers casually mentioned that Videoball can support more than six players, though three-on-three was the limit in the build we played. I don't know whether the final build of the game will allow for four-plus person teams, but I hope so.

The idea of four-on-four Videoball excites me, but it also highlights a longtime PC gaming weakness: local multiplayer. Since the Nintendo 64, consoles have supported four players on a single system. That doesn't work on a keyboard. Instead, the PC focuses on online gaming, which is great better, for real-time strategy and games like Counter-Strike but playing online is an alternative to playing together on a couch, not a replacement.

These days, most PC gamers have at least one controller in the house. But four? Or eight? That's a $100-$200 investment, and until now there's been no reason to take that plunge. I think 2014 is the first year those extra controllers will be worth buying. Videoball is only one reason.

Hokra's minimalist sport aesthetic is even simpler than Videoball's.

Hokra, part of the Sportsfriends bundle planned for release on Steam in the spring, is another. Like Videoball, it's an abstract sports game that takes a few seconds to learn and then opens up to endless player strategy. The one-on-one tension of Nidhogg, which we loved, and the four-player chaos of Ouya darling Towerfall, coming March 11, are two more strong arguments for local competitive gaming.

SteamOS, Steam Machines, and in-home streaming finally provide an opportunity to bring the PC's thriving indie game scene into the living room. These games can take over parties and justify having four controllers around (one Xbox 360 wireless receiver, by the way, can sync with four controllers). There are still hurdles, like in-home streaming lag and the cost of buying a second computer for the living room. But for indie developers making small games like Hokra and Videoball, the PC represents an open platform without the challenges or costs of publishing on a console. And that means we're going to keep getting more of their games.

For the first time it's actually practical to play multiplayer PC games in the living room, and there's a growing list of competitive games offering a good reason to do so. When it comes out hopefully in June I think Videoball's going to be at the top of my list.
PC Gamer
videoball-teaser


It's been two weeks since I played Videoball, and I still think about it at least once a day. The game has been playing on repeat in my brain for two reasons. One: it's that addictive sort of fun that makes you want to play just one more round. Two: Videoball and some other games coming out this year, like Hokra and Towerfall, have me more excited than I've ever been about local competitive PC gaming.

Videoball's designer Tim Rogers calls it "an abstract minimalist electronic sport," and an early trailer for the game describes it as "casual enough for a child's birthday party, hard enough to televise in prison." Both of these statements sound silly, but they're also true. Videoball is one of those games that you look at and go "Hmm. Okay. Looks fun, I guess?" And then you play it, and you go "Oh," and then you don't want to stop until you've mastered it.

I knew I liked Videoball's minimalist aesthetic and peppy music and chirpy sound effects, but had no idea how it would really feel to play. Textures are nowhere to be found in Videoball the art is all solid colors and basic geometric shapes. The "players" on the field are simple triangles that harken back to the ship from Asteroids. The ball, which you try to knock into the other team's endzone, is a simple circle. Blocks, which are used to block the ball, are simple squares.

"Oh" was the response I had once I played Videoball, because I realized its minimalism extends beneath its colorful skin. Minimalism is the guiding force behind Videoball's design, and the game wields simplicity like a machete. Its controls (a single analog stick handles motion, a single button does everything else) and straightforward goal (knock a ball into the other team's endzone) slice away the hundred hour learning periods of competitive games like League of Legends.



"It started out as a dare between my friend Bennett Foddy who made the game QWOP," Rogers said. "We were talking about making minimalist, one button Starcraft. I must've made 40 or 50 prototypes of one button Starcraft...none of those turned into anything that I would be willing to show anyone else. So then it's like, well, why not put an analog stick in there? Why not make it so you can move the thing around?"

That's more or less how Videoball became a minimalist sports game, though Rogers noted that it played more slowly at the start more like a strategy game and morphed into the fast-paced game we played.

Or, as Tim Rogers explained through analogy, "There's a fine balance between making this game Mario Party-ish and making it Bomberman-ish. Making it friendly to somebody who just wants to party, and friendly to somebody who wants to get real mad at a party."


It's all in the reflexes
After a couple minutes I knew how to play Videoball, and I also knew that its simplicity leads to a deep competitive game ruled by timing and strategy, not complex mechanics. A single second's action or deliberate inaction can make a massive difference in Videoball. Every second you hold the action button, your little triangular player charges up a shot. A piddly level one shot will barely move the ball. A level two shot is like a solid kick. A level three shot is a slam that can knock a ball across the entire field. Hold the button for one more second after the level three shot, though, and your pulsing slam charge morphs into a defensive block you can't hold onto the button and keep a powerful charge built up indefinitely.

The one second that passes between charging a slam shot and letting it transform into a defensive block that's the game. That one second is Videoball.

Every strategic option in the game plays on that tight timing. Do you want to fire a level 2 shoot to knock the ball away from your opponent? Or wait until they fire and try to reflect the shot with a shot of your own, redirecting the ball's momentum? Do you fire a level 3 charge without being in a good position, hoping to knock the ball into an enemy (contact with the ball stuns you briefly) or try to get into a scoring position before the charge turns into a block? Do you position yourself on the back half of the field to play defensively and spawn blocks in front of your goal, or do you stay on the enemy's half of the field?



"We see a lot of basketball strategy happening, where you have someone being center or forward," Rogers said. "I'm talking about three-on-three... you'll see players start to play horizontal lines, along the bottom and the top, trusting each other. You'll see players start playing zones."

I played two games of Videoball two-on-two. The first game, two of us were learning. My team won 10-9 in about six minutes. In the second game, we started to grasp the basics of Videoball strategy, and played with only one ball on the field instead of two. My team won that game by a wider margin. But it took 20 minutes.

"Usually the games are over in about three to five minutes," Rogers said. "We had a two ball game on Sunday go to 22 minutes. And that's with people who've played the game over 100 hours each. We've had one ball games go to an hour. You start to see people stop releasing level 3 shots from their own zone due to the danger of it being reflected."

Even in an unfinished state Videoball still has art polish to add, a soundtrack to expand, varied arenas to include, online play code to implement I think the game has taken on the form of any successful sport. It supplies a field, simple rules, and straightforward mechanics. Player skill and strategy fill in the rest, like they do in football or basketball.
Bringing competition into the living room
When we talked, Rogers casually mentioned that Videoball can support more than six players, though three-on-three was the limit in the build we played. I don't know whether the final build of the game will allow for four-plus person teams, but I hope so.

The idea of four-on-four Videoball excites me, but it also highlights a longtime PC gaming weakness: local multiplayer. Since the Nintendo 64, consoles have supported four players on a single system. That doesn't work on a keyboard. Instead, the PC focuses on online gaming, which is great better, for real-time strategy and games like Counter-Strike but playing online is an alternative to playing together on a couch, not a replacement.

These days, most PC gamers have at least one controller in the house. But four? Or eight? That's a $100-$200 investment, and until now there's been no reason to take that plunge. I think 2014 is the first year those extra controllers will be worth buying. Videoball is only one reason.

Hokra's minimalist sport aesthetic is even simpler than Videoball's.

Hokra, part of the Sportsfriends bundle planned for release on Steam in the spring, is another. Like Videoball, it's an abstract sports game that takes a few seconds to learn and then opens up to endless player strategy. The one-on-one tension of Nidhogg, which we loved, and the four-player chaos of Ouya darling Towerfall, coming March 11, are two more strong arguments for local competitive gaming.

SteamOS, Steam Machines, and in-home streaming finally provide an opportunity to bring the PC's thriving indie game scene into the living room. These games can take over parties and justify having four controllers around (one Xbox 360 wireless receiver, by the way, can sync with four controllers). There are still hurdles, like in-home streaming lag and the cost of buying a second computer for the living room. But for indie developers making small games like Hokra and Videoball, the PC represents an open platform without the challenges or costs of publishing on a console. And that means we're going to keep getting more of their games.

For the first time it's actually practical to play multiplayer PC games in the living room, and there's a growing list of competitive games offering a good reason to do so. When it comes out hopefully in June I think Videoball's going to be at the top of my list.
PC Gamer
titanfall1

If you plan on playing Titanfall on a laptop or want to install it on a solid state hard drive, you might need to prepare in advance for the game s March 11 release date. Responding to a question from a fan, Respawn Entertainment s Vince Zampella said on Twitter that the PC version of Titanfall s will be a 21 gigabyte download, and will take up a whopping 48 gigabytes when installed.
Hard drives are cheap these days, so it s not like this poses a huge problem to most players, but that s still an impressive size, especially for a multiplayer-only game. In 2012, the cutscene-heavy Max Payne 3, which had both singleplayer and multiplayer modes, weighed in at 35 gigabytes. Last year's Call of Duty: Ghosts required 40GB of hard drive space.
As we previously reported, Titanfall s minimum system requirements are otherwise not that demanding:


OS: 64-bit Windows 7, 8, 8.1
CPU: AMD Athlon X2 2.8GHz or Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz
Memory: 4GB RAM
GPU: 512MB VRAM, Radeon HD 4770 or GeForce 8800GT

For more Titanfall coverage, make sure to check out our Titanfall beta gameplay video on the Large Pixel Collider, with maxed settings at a 2560x1440 resolution.
PC Gamer
TowerOfGuns


New indie shooter Tower of Guns looks like it's custom made for the time-crunched, over-scheduled gamer. The FPS releases March 4 and offers randomized mayhem and challenges the developer Terrible Posture Games says can be accomplished in a single, lunch break-sized sitting. It also has a wonderful and vicious-sounding shotgun rocket launcher which sounds like a perfectly natural way to relax.

Designer Joe Mirabello started the one-man operation of Terrible Posture Games after the collapse of his former development house, 38 Studios. Replayability seems to be on Mirabello's mind with Tower of Guns, as the FPS applies a thick coat of randomness to its bosses, power-ups, and enemies, according to the game's official website.

"For all of those who have too many games (or too little time) this is a game you can pick up and play again and again, without remembering where you were or what you were up to," reads the description on Steam. "If you're gonna win, you're gonna do it within an hour or two. That's a big if though... it won't be easy."

Because of its interesting mix of gun upgrades and centuple jumping, Tower of Guns had already made our list of shooters to keep an eye out for in 2014. You can check out the game's launch trailer below.

PC Gamer
Risen 1


Looking out over the vast and metaphorical landscape of 2014, vast craters have scarred the Earth. These all-consuming acres of destruction represent the RPGs that will be unleashed upon our spare time. Whether it's Pillars of Eternity, Dragon Age: Inquisition, Wasteland 2 or The Witcher 3, there are long, winding and morally flexible roads expanding out in every direction. Before you try to unravel this sprawling adventure, pay heed to another RPG that's soon to emerge from the depths of PC development. Piranha Bytes have officially unveiled Risen 3: Titan Lords.

A press release sent out by the developers attempts to summarise the plot. It is, as far as I can tell, mostly gibberish. Here, see if you can do any better than I did:

"The world of Risen 3 is abandoned by all gods and suffers from the Titan Wars when a new threat rises from the soil. A young warrior is attacked from the shadows and deprived of his soul. He sets off to reclaim what is lost amidst the darkness that is spreading throughout the world. The banned Mages could be powerful allies on his quest. To get their help, he needs to find the Mage sanctuary on Taranis, also known as the Island of Thunder. Protected by the Guardians, the Mages search the mines of Taranis for crystals loaded with magic energy. Will the player join the Guardians to get in contact with the Mages? Or will he choose one of the other guilds in Risen 3 to reach his goals?"

It's a fantasy RPG, then. That much is painfully apparent. It's also one with a heavy focus on exploration. Piranha Bytes invoke both earlier Risen games, and their previous series, Gothic, as affirmation of their commitment to player freedom in both Risen 3's story and world.

As always when an RPG is announced, I'm defaulting to a state of cautious optimism. As Rich's review pointed out at the time, Risen 2 was an extremely clunky, but still somewhat compelling pirate themed RPG. Hopefully Piranha Bytes can finally nail the balance of wild and unpredictable story, and competent and stable game code.

Risen 3: Titan Lords is due out this August for PC, as well as Xbox 360 and PS3. More screenshots below.







PC Gamer
Wasteland


Here's a strangely refreshing consequence of Kickstarter's success. If Wasteland 2 had been a publisher-led project, its trailer would likely be a showy affair full of isometric drama, tension and violence. Here, though, that isn't the case. While the trailer InXile have produced does contain some violence, it also features an extended sequence in which someone picks their team's skills. And if that's got your heart racing, you'd better prepare yourself for the unedited inventory management.



The trailer is in celebration of a significant new patch, now available for the game's beta. You can see the full patch notes for that update at the Wasteland 2 blog.

For those of us instead waiting for the full game to release, you'll have to make do with sitting back and dreaming of blood sausages and assignable stat points.
...