Kotaku

Does This Mean Metal Gear Solid: Rising is Coming to Vita?We've heard rumors before that Konami would be releasing Metal Gear: Rising on the PlayStation Vita handheld in addition to home consoles. This page from the Vita presentation during the AT&T Developer Summit looks to reveal that in addition to the other franchises we already knew about (including Bioshock and Call of Duty), Metal Gear Solid: Rising will also be coming to the Vita.


Given the game's focus on Raiden and his super-sharp sword, this certainly seems like it'd be a good fit for the Vita's swipe screen. We've reached out to Konami for comment and will update if and when we hear back.


The image in question, via superannuation.


Does This Mean Metal Gear Solid: Rising is Coming to Vita?


Kotaku

Does This Mean Metal Gear Rising is Coming to Vita? [Update]We've heard rumors before that Konami would be releasing Metal Gear: Rising on the PlayStation Vita handheld in addition to home consoles. This page from the Vita presentation during the AT&T Developer Summit appears to reveal that in addition to the other franchises we already knew about (including Bioshock and Call of Duty), Metal Gear Solid: Rising will also be coming to the Vita.


(To clarify, the logo in the image says Metal Gear Solid: Rising, though the game as it's been announced is titled Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance. Awesomely.)


Given the game's focus on Raiden and his super-sharp sword, this certainly seems like it'd be a good fit for the Vita's swipe screen. We've reached out to Konami for comment and will update if and when we hear back.


The image in question, via superannuation.


Does This Mean Metal Gear Rising is Coming to Vita? [Update]


Update: When asked about the rumor on Twitter, Sony's Shane Bettenhausen said "That supposed leaked press conf info is 100% fabricated."


Kotaku
Hitler Recaps the Week in Video GamingGodwin's Law states that "as an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1." As basically all video game discussion takes place online, let's just cut to the chase and give der fuehrer's take on recent topics of interest to gamers.


Hitler Reacts to Sniper Elite v2 Part 1

As you can imagine, there are loads of these. Here are two sent by reader Logan R.


April 13, 2012.
By MookySplitArse



Hitler Reacts to Sniper Elite v2 Part 2

As you can imagine, there are loads of these. Here are two sent by reader Logan R.


April 13, 2012.
By MookySplitArse



What Hitler Thinks About CS:GO

Specifically, he's unhappy that underground was removed from the game.
April 22, 2012.
By Marcelmlm



Hitler is Banned from Runescape

A common theme of Hitler video game videos. "SHIT!! I was so close to getting my fletching skill cape."


April 22, 2012.
By jaber3288



Hitler Finds Out that FIFA 12 has DLC

(enable captions) Basically, his tantrum is not so much the DLC (UEFA 2012), but the fact he now has additional achievements to get after already reaching 1,000 Gamerscore on FIFA 12


April 22, 2012.
By ukmerkzxxx


(Image via captain-america.us)
Kotaku
Backhanded Box Quotes: "Metacritic Reviews Are Often Avenues for Trolling"Welcome to "Backhanded Box Quotes," a collection of super pissed-off user reviews from people just like you! Whoa, whoa, don't take that personal.

This week's scan of proportionate reactions to entertainment products includes condemnation for something almost universally acclaimed and a scalding appraisal of a football video game from EA Sports that is not named Madden.

UEFA Euro 2012

Released: April 24
Critic: Frazzi (Metacritic).


"Lets also ignore the fact that Metacritic user reviews are often avenues for trolling."


"Be smarter than me and not waste your money on this absolutely cynical release from EA. "
Score: 3.


Critic: uk_friday (Metacritic).


"EA clearly have committed suicide with this product and heads should roll."


"Players disappear from your squad during the tournament and new players arrive ... Did they miss the plane? Did they just go home and sulk?"
Score: 1.



Prototype 2

Released: April 24
Critic: Prototype 2 (Metacritic).
"As I learned from Mass Effect 3's review, the ending is everything, have you seen this game's ending? the ending was terrible!!!"


"It all builds up to a Final Epic Battle of simple quick-time events"
Score: 1.



Botanicula

Released: April 20
Critic: eastrazor (Metacritic).


"**** **** **** ! Boring"


"**** for kids !"


"I fought that it will be funn or even hard but this is game for not too smart kids."
Score: 0.


Backhanded Box Quotes will be an occasional feature of Kotaku's Anger Management hour, unless it isn't.
Kotaku
Out of Hand—Is it Ever OK to Throw a Controller?Two weeks ago, a million-dollar contest supplied an interesting prism through which to view the reactions to different people's failure to accomplish the same thing in a video game.


In one, a gamer stretched a remarkable achievement into an inhuman streak of perfection, ultimately snapped as much by bad luck as his own physical limitations. In others, their attempts were thwarted much earlier, before they could even be considered any kind of an achievement.


The failure to throw a perfect game in MLB 2K12 and the gamer's decision either to not throw a controller into the wall, or to shatter it upon the floor, was likewise either entirely sympathetic, or entirely contemptible.


"People who smash $50 controllers are childish douche bags," said one commenter, reacting to this anthology of disappointed gamers' disproportionate reactions. And that's certainly a reasonable opinion.


"I would have thrown that tv and system out the window," said another commenter, after seeing T.J. Brida's very sedate response to losing a perfectly pitched baseball game in the 14th inning. And likewise, many of us would empathize.


Is controller-throwing ever justified? Is it never justified? What does it say about a video game that inspires such behavior? What does it say about a gamer who lacks that kind of self-control?


I've gone to some very dark places in my video gaming career. Remember the Flightstick Pro? That thing was probably $80 in 1996. And I wrecked one playing X-Wing on the Mac. Picked it up by the stick and slammed the base into the desk on the game's penultimate mission, above the Death Star's surface.


In 2005, playing The Warriors on Xbox, the game's missions had the habit of switching to a forced perspective—either a platform elevation or an isometric view—and putting you into a minigame that didn't correspond to the controls you had been playing with for so long. On one level I repeatedly failed, I gouged a chunk out of my apartment wall with the controller, which I would spackel over with a toothpaste-and-water mixture before moving. My downstairs neighbor—extremely concerned—confronted me the next day. In a "don't ask" tone of voice designed to get me out of the conversation, I told her that I was dealing with some "personal issues."


Yeah, if you're willing to throw an embarrassing temper tantrum and physically destroy console hardware, you probably do have personal issues.


Why is it that controller-throwing is OK? I think it's because it's a symbol of the console. A twin analog controller or a gamepad has no purpose other than to play a video game, whereas a mouse and a keyboard has other applications, and therefore destroying it would be even more pointlessly self destructive. It's why the Flightstick got slammed on my desk. But when I played Dark Forces with a keyboard and mouse, I took out my frustrations kicking the trashcan.


I don't think it is ever OK to throw a controller. If the game is that disappointing, take it to the store where you bought it and demand a refund. (I realize we're talking about physical media sold at retail. This phenomenon, to my mind, seems to be symptomatic of console gaming. If you're hurling keyboards and mice because of a PC game, then you really have issues.)


Do we want to see destroyed controllers? Sure! The post about MLB 2K12 players trashing theirs is the most-viewed post in the short three-month history of Sportaku. No. 2? The narrative about TJ Brida. Readers, even if they weren't sports video gamers, deeply sympathized with his disappointment—even as he made no physical demonstration of that.


It also raises up a truth that has been very hard for me to accept as a writer and, to be honest, a basically immature person: Never confuse a natural interest in the spectacle of anger for an actual interest in what is making you angry.


Hey folks, Something Negative is a rant. Love it or hate it, we all need to blow off steam on Fridays. Let yours out in the comments.


Kotaku

Heart of the Swarm, the first expansion for Blizzard's Starcraft II, will be in playable beta at this year's MLG pro gaming championship in Anaheim, which runs from June 8-10th.


Kotaku

One Leaves, One Enters Kotaku's Power 40 If you scan the column to the right of the Kotaku.com/Power 40 list, you'll find our reorganized list updated for April complete with individual updates where relevant, and a returning addition: Capcom.


With sales on Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City doing well after release, and Resident Evil 6 coming together nicely, it's about time Capcom makes a return to Power 40.


News of Best Buy CEO Brian Dunn stepping down from his position has also impacted our list. His removal makes way for Capcom's Ryozo Tsujimoto.


We took a look at the industry's current status and progression this month to assess who are the most powerful players that influence what we play, how we play, how we get our games and/or what we think of games.


You can look forward to May's update in a month's time, after we've reassessed any new industry developments.


Kotaku
Rosman Stadium—the House that Prototype 2 BuiltPrototype's continuity is set in New York. Well, it's set in "New York Zero," which is what the city has become after an apocalyptic biological disaster. Still, it's New York, home of some of the most famous athletic venues in the world.


The original Prototype, set entirely on Manhattan, featured a Madison Square Garden-style building, even if because of licensing restrictions, the game couldn't really describe it as such (though it did offer a landmark collectible.) MSG reappears in Prototype 2, scene of a late-game boss battle inside the "Red Zone," which is a thoroughly overrun Manhattan.


But Prototype 2 begins in other boroughs, one of them recognizably the Bronx. Naturally that meant a cameo by Yankee Stadium, and it too is the venue for a super-powered badass throwdown.


This is "Rosman Stadium," at least I think that is the facility's name, judging by the ruined sign I inspected before jumping in. I asked Radical how "Rosman Stadium" got its name, and the answer was quite simple. It's named for Ken Rosman, the head of the studio that made the game.


In the game, it has been converted into a staging ground for the Blackwatch corporation's "Project Orion". Here's a video of how you'll throwdown in the mission set there. The alternate future outcome for this so-called hallowed ground isn't so unbelievable to my mind. I have every faith those fascist Yankees are would salute and do the bidding of those authoritarian Blackwatch bastards.


Kotaku
MLB 2K12's Perfect Game Challenge Does Judge You on Your Physical SkillTo throw a perfect game, a single pitcher must retire every batter, and at least 27 of them, in a victory. That we know. 2K Sports, in its "$1 Million Perfect Game Challenge, on Major League Baseball 2K12, applies a formula to those games, rating their degree of "perfection," so to speak, according to factors like pitch count and strikeouts.


Here's what I didn't know until now: You are also judged on the physical perfection of your pitched game.


I didn't realize this until I scanned back through the Major League Baseball 2K12 Facebook page and read something posted a month ago by the game's top man for development, senior producer Mark Little.


"On top of the difficulty score, we also look at how you throw the perfect game to determine your final perfect game score," he wrote on March 27. "We look at things like strikeouts, pitch count and your pitch gesture accuracy [emphasis mine] to determine the overall perfect game score. So if you are looking to increase your score, try to maximize strikeouts, minimize total pitch count and be as perfect as you can be with your pitching mechanics. Weak pitches and bad gestures hurt your overall score."


So, even if you hang a sinker with the game's right stick controls, and get an opposing batter to beat it into the ground, if you get lucky with bad stuff, that will be factored in. This is important to realize as the Perfect Game Challenge enters its final four days. After Monday, those who threw the eight "best" perfect games-judged according to the factors that Little describes—will get a trip to New York to play in an eight-man tournament for the final $1 million prize.


I really had no idea it was judging your actual physical gestures—and if you throw a weak pitch or make a bad gesture, the game will inform you of it with a map showing how your pitch command deviated from the ideal input. I just figured that the ends would justify the means. They don't.


This makes early-inning pitch effectiveness critical. As your pitcher tires in later innings, he will have less time in which to complete a proper throw. While a fastball may be a two-position motion, breaking balls often require pushing the right stick to one location and then winding it. A 12-6 curveball requires the most torque. Late in the game, these will be your least perfect pitches, which makes throwing them perfectly early on even more critical.


The other major factor is the degree of difficulty. As we enter the final four days of this contest, throwing a perfect game under tougher conditions becomes absolutely critical for those looking for last-minute placement in the final eight. The lowest score on the leaderboard as of writing is a 796, well more than 200 points higher than it was two weeks ago. To crack the lineup this late, you will need to throw a perfect game with a weaker pitcher against a stronger hitting lineup.


You can see the ratings when you choose a game from the "MLB Today" menu and select the MLB 2K12 Contest option. It will rate the matchup for you depending on which team you choose to pitch with. In my judgment, at this late stage, there is no reason to attempt a perfect game whose difficulty is rated below 80.


Fortunately, there are four matchups today that offer such a challenge.


(pitching as) Colorado vs. New York Mets: 87
Seattle vs Toronto: 82
St. Louis vs. Milwaukee: 82
Chicago Cubs vs. Philadelphia: 81
New York Yankees vs. Detroit: 81


Of these, the Yankees offer maybe the most enticement: it's a popular team and a strong batting order—you'll just be taking Ivan Nova against an extremely potent hitting attack from the Tigers (and cover star Justin Verlander).


Drew Pomeranz versus the Mets, in Denver, deserves his 87 rating. Not only is it in the thin Rocky Mountain air, Pomeranz, the team's fifth starter, hasn't gone past the sixth inning in two starts.


Again, this contest is over when the clock strikes midnight on May 1. So pick the toughest matchup you can find, and good luck.


Kotaku

So How's That PlayStation Move Controller Treating You?In today's moving edition of Speak Up on Kotaku, commenter Aikage teases us all with stop motion porn. Oh, and he mentions the PlayStation Move controller as well. Which is more exciting? Both, probably.


zoop di doo!


So I just bought a move controller because amazon had a deal! I can't say no to things I don't need if they're on SALE!
Then it got to me and it turns out I needed to buy the eye. Ok, so I bought an EYE! Now what?


Do I need that navigation controller or not? What can I do with a move controller? How does the precision compare to the Wii? Is there anything that isn't gimmicky mini games that I can play? DID I MAKE A MISTAKE? I guess if nothing else my wife and I can find some creative uses for the camera. STOP MOTION XXX. Look for it in theaters near you!


About Speak Up on Kotaku: Our readers have a lot to say, and sometimes what they have to say has nothing to do with the stories we run. That's why we have a forum on Kotaku called Speak Up. That's the place to post anecdotes, photos, game tips and hints, and anything you want to share with Kotaku at large. Every weekday we'll pull one of the best Speak Up posts we can find and highlight it here.
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