Kotaku

This season's Retro Game Master ends with a bang as the Kacho takes on... Golden Axe.



Released in 1989 by Sega for the arcade, this high fantasy side-scroller beat 'em up later made its way to a number of different consoles. In the game players take on the role of a dwarf, a barbarian or an amazon as they journey through the world on a quest to kill Death Adder.



The show goes live only on Kotaku at 8 p.m. eastern this Thursday, followed by more weekly episodes "airing" on Kotaku at the same time and day through September. And unlike with television, these episodes will stick around on our site so you can watch them at your own leisure.



Game Center CX produced 15 seasons of gaming content in Japan, with Shinya Arino playing through dozens of Famicom, Super Famicom, PC Engine and Mega Drive games. These first U.S. airings of the episodes includes English captions for Arino and English dubbing for his off-camera announcer.


Kotaku

Due to some technical difficulties we were unable to "air" the last episode of this season's Retro Game Master last week. Sorry about that. Fortunately, the show is all ready to run this Thursday. This week: Golden Axe


Kotaku

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro KaufmanWe've got another Massive Black artist for you today, which is always a treat. Coro Kaufman is one of the studio's co-founders, and also serves as its art director. Needless to say, his stuff is great.



In this gallery you'll see examples from many of the games he's worked on over the past few years, including Red Faction, Army of Two, Lost Planet 2, Silent Hill and even Golden Axe.



In addition to his video game work, Kaufman has also whipped up concepts for commercials, toys, TV, movies, clothes and even album covers. He's also putting the finishing touches on a graphic novel called Transient Man, which is about a hobo who may or may not be "an inter-dimensional savior of humanity, on a mission to save the universe".



You can check out the comic here, and if you like what you see, hit up the Kickstarter page and help get it printed!





You can contact Luke Plunkett, the author of this post, at plunkett@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman

The Destructive Video Game Art of Coro Kaufman


Kotaku

Meat Bun Dresses You In Wizards And WarriorsThe sorcerers at Meat Bun have summoned forth a magical set of t-shirts for their summer 2010 line, "Wizards 'n Warriors," celebrating the 8-bit fantasy fighters and casters who made the early days of gaming so magical.



The six new t-shirts in the "Wizards 'n Warriors" line continue Meat Bun's proud tradition of creating wearable art that embodies classic video games without tossing it in your face. There's something for everyone here, whether you love blood-soaked warriors, subtle ninja, tiny Viking dwarves, or eggplants. Hell, there's double eggplant love in this batch.



As much as I admire the subtlety of some of the designs, it's the least subtle of the group that's caught my eye. You shall be mine, Thunderhead. Oh yes, you shall be mine.



It's time to bug the living hell out of Meat Bun's own Michael McWhertor.



Meat Bun Online Store [Meat Bun]


Kotaku

Sega Genesis Classics Now Available On Steam The first batch of downloadable Sega Genesis games for the PC has hit Steam, giving gamers a new way to spend $2.99 apiece on games like Ecco the Dolphin, Vectorman, and Sonic 3D Blast.



Why worry about the ambiguous moral and legal issues surrounding emulation when you can just buy Sega Genesis titles for your PC? The first batch of Sega Genesis Classics is now available on Steam, with $2.99 scoring players legitimate copies of a number of games previously available only through the dozens of game compilations Sega has released over the past decade.



For those who prefer those compilations, Steam is also offering up the Sega Classics pack, featuring Comix Zone, Crack Down, Ecco the Dolphin, Gain Ground, Golden Axe, Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master, Sonic 3D Blast, Space Harrier II, Vectorman, Altered Beast, and Shadow Dancer, all for $34.99.



I'm very interested to see how these things sell. Can Sega get players to pay for these? Will you pay for these?



Thanks to Jim for reminding us these were coming.


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