Eurogamer


Crysis launches on PlayStation Network and Xbox Live on 4th October, EA has revealed.


That's a Tuesday, so for Europeans, the game will release on PSN a day later, on Wednesday, 5th October.


The game costs £15.99 or 1600 Microsoft Points.


Publisher EA has described the console download as a "modified and enhanced" version of the single-player campaign from 2007 game Crysis 1. It also features optimized Nanosuit controls, fine-tuned combat and full stereoscopic 3D support, all powered by CryEngine 3.


Eurogamer's Crysis review shot a 9/10. "This is a game that feels supremely engineered, like a precision machine, or a German automobile," Jim Rossignol wrote.

Video: Crysis 1 on console.

Kotaku

Crysis Doesn't Just Run On Consoles, It SoarsThe original 2007 Crysis has a benchmark-y quality to it. It is no longer the Best-Looking PC Game In The World, but it retains some of that "must-have" mystique nonetheless. Perhaps it's because it's one of only a few hardcore first-person shooters that has never been ported to consoles. But every time one of my console-playing friends builds a new gaming PC, first thing he or she does is go straight to Steam and download the game.



Well, it's a PC exclusive no longer. Crytek and EA have announced a coming downloadable version of Crysis for Xbox 360 and PS3, which will use the updated CryEngine 3 that powered this year's Crysis 2. Earlier this week I had a chance to play it on Xbox 360, and I was so impressed that one of my first questions was, somewhat unbelievably: "Is this being ported to PC?"



Sadly, the answer was "No." I took a moment to reflect on the question I'd just asked: "Will I be able to play a PC port of your console port of a PC game?" Dogs and cats! Living together!



Crysis Doesn't Just Run On Consoles, It SoarsSo here's the part where I commit heresy and say that yes, I rather like using an Xbox 360 controller with my PC. Blah blah, PC Master Race, superiority and precision of the mouse and keyboard, blah. I love precision as much as the next guy, and I play a good number of games with a mouse and keyboard (including the original Crysis). But I also like to kick back with a controller in my hand and relax, and I even like controller-rumble! It feels good on m'hands. Furthermore, I've recently taken to moving my PC over to my giant HDTV and running my games on the big screen, (you should see The Witcher 2 running on a 55-inch display, good god), and at the moment, I'm unable to play mouse/keyboard games while sitting in front of my television.



This is all a disclaimer-filled preamble to where I talk about how I played Crysis 2 on PC with a 360 controller. It worked great, and as I've mentioned before, I liked that game more than a little bit. I played a ton of Crysis with a mouse and keyboard, partly because the way that the game mapped to a 360 controller never felt right (and couldn't be customized, boo). The crouch didn't stick, the iron-sights did… and iron-sights were assigned to RB? Left trigger brought up the suit menu, but there was no one-button way to toggle between the suit's abilities. And worst of all, there was no way to go prone when using a controller… none. You had to use the keyboard. It was all a bit of a mess, particularly when compared to the intuitive controller-mapping in Crysis 2.



So when I sat down alongside Crytek's Miles Clapham to play through a chunk of Crysis's campaign on the Xbox 360, the first thing I noticed was how good the new controls felt. The mapping has been redone to match with Crysis 2—RB now toggles stealth mode, sprint and power-jump are tied to the left thumbstick and the A button (you hold it down to do a power-jump). Other strength functions are tied to the environment—for example, get close enough to a soldier and you'll be given a prompt to grab him.



Crysis Doesn't Just Run On Consoles, It SoarsThe second thing I noticed is how great the game looks—thanks to the improved tech of CryEngine 3, Crysis on consoles looks just about as good as the (un-modded) PC version of the game, albeit not running in as high a resolution. I played through a chunk of the fourth chapter of the game, "Assault," which Crysis fans will remember as the mission that begins with a nighttime beach-run under heavy artillery fire. Midway through the level, the sun rises over Lingshan Island, and it looked as spectacular as I remember it from the first game. The lighting, foliage, and sense of "alive-ness" has been carried over intact. The small details are present, too—as I made my way up the beach, a small family of crabs skittered out of my way, and grenade blasts knocked over trees as reliably as ever.



Some aspects of the gameplay have been tweaked—I noticed that stealth mode depleted the nanosuit's reserves far more slowly, making the game feel a bit closer to its more-forgiving sequel. Inventory has been mapped to the "Y" button, with a nice four-direction menu like the one found in the console versions of Half-Life 2. But by and large, Crysis on Xbox 360 moved and played just like its PC counterpart. The physics and gunplay have that same precision, and the world has the same sense of complex reactiveness.



Clapham told me that, by far, the hardest part of getting Crysis to work on the Xbox was getting all of its AIs and systems to run simultaneously on the 360's comparatively small memory reserves. "I played through Crysis on PC on medium/low settings," he said, "and it used up 1.6 Gigs in the end. And we've got that down to 256MB [on the PS3], so we've had a huge squeeze there. The console has lots of processing power, but just to be able to run the kinds of things [the number of simultaneous systems] we're running in Crysis was a real challenge. Running this kind of visual quality on the PC, with the same hardware spec as the console, it runs at half the framerate of what we have now. CryEngine 3 has been huge, we've got huge improvements to the rendering pipeline."



All of the open, emergent fun of Crysis is here, and it's more playable than ever.

The entire time I played, Crysis ran beautifully, with nary a hitch or a framerate dip. Even on my 2011 gaming PC, Crysis hits some framerate issues when I run it at ultra-spec. But I saw no slowdown as I fought my way through guard posts, across bridges, over beaches and through the jungle. All of the open, emergent fun of Crysis is here, and it's more playable than ever.



The game will be out on October 4 on PS3 and Xbox 360, and will go for $19.99, or 1600 Microsoft points. It will be single-player only, and will not include Crysis's "Power Struggle" multiplayer mode. Most of the human enemies are North Korean soldiers, but they always speak English unless players put the difficulty all the way up to "Delta" mode. Sadly, there will still not be an option to turn on Korean enemy barks without changing the difficulty, but Clapham told me that the team is using the much-improved English audio enemy dialogue from Crysis: Warhead instead of the painfully bad tracks in the original Crysis, so that's something.



Crysis Doesn't Just Run On Consoles, It SoarsCrysis will never look as good on a console as it does on a high-end gaming PC, particularly if the PC version of the game has been modded or tweaked at all. But I was impressed with how thoroughly Crytek has translated the game to the new (old) systems. And perhaps more importantly, Crysis now handles very well—suit abilities are easier to access, vehicles handle better, and the whole thing feels nicely streamlined. And while the very mention of the word "streamlined" will make some PC players grumpy, well… there'll always be the original PC version. I, for one, would love to see a CryEngine 3 version of Crysis running in DirectX 11 on a tricked-out gaming PC. Sigh… we always want what we can't have.



By dropping the game into October Crytek and EA have chosen a… challenging time to release an FPS. A 2007 PC re-release stands no real chance of competing with Modern Warfare 3 and Battlefield 3. That said, neither of those games offer Crysis's uniquely engaging blend of sandboxy-shooting, stealth, and reactive action. Then again, they also don't share Crysis' dramatically inferior third act and finale. (Unless one of those games features hugely annoying flying squid enemies that no one's talking about.)



While it's tough to say how Crysis will do commercially, from what I saw, it plays well and looks lovely. Console players will finally have a chance to experience one of the longest-standing PC exclusives that they've never gotten to play, and the rest of us can kick back on the couch, grab a controller, and revisit an action classic.



Crawling through the leaves

Enemy patrol is near

Frog goes hopping by





You can contact Kirk Hamilton, the author of this post, at kirk@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

A New Homefront is Coming and the People Who Made Far Cry Are Making It The folks behind Crysis and Far Cry have teamed up with THQ to work on the next Homefront, the publisher said this morning.



The game isn't due out for another 1 1/2 to 2 years, the company said in a press release.



"We see Homefront as a really strong universe that has a lot of potential and that has been expertly created and marketed by THQ," said Cevat Yerli, Founder, CEO and President of Crytek. "We believe that bringing our level of quality, creativity and production values to the next Homefront title creates an opportunity for both THQ and Crytek to deliver a truly blockbuster game. It's really important to us that THQ has the faith in giving us a lot of creative freedom over one of its most important properties to allow us to bring the Homefront world to life in a new and innovative way."



Homefront, which hit earlier this year to mixed reviews, took place during a future America occupied by North Korean forces. The game featured brutal portrayals of an occupied country in the year 2027. The game ended on a bit of a cliffhanger, with rebel forces taking back part of the country, but with still much to do.



THQ says Homefront was a commercial success and that the "yet-to-be-named sequel" is scheduled for release during THQ's fiscal 2014 on console and PC. THQ's 2014 fiscal year runs from April, 2013 to March 2014.



However, that commercial success didn't prevent THQ from shuttering the New York City-based developer behind the game. Kaos Studios was shut down over the summer as part of a "strategic realignment within its internal studio structure," the company told Kotaku at the time. THQ also said at the time that THQ's Montreal studio "will take over product development and overall creative management for the Homefront franchise."



So why shift gears and go with an outside studio?



"Selecting Crytek to take Homefront forward underscores our strategy of working with the industry's best talent," said Danny Bilson, EVP Core Games, THQ. "Homefront's unique setting and storyline captivated gamers the world over. With Crytek's industry leading technology and legendary experience in the FPS genre, we're supremely confident that the next Homefront will deliver that AAA-quality experience that players demand."





You can contact Brian Crecente, the author of this post, at brian@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Eurogamer

UPDATE 2: Crysis costs 1600 Microsoft Points on Xbox Live and £15.99/$19.99 on PlayStation Network.


Publisher EA describes the console download as a "modified and enhanced" version of the single-player campaign from Crysis 1. It also features optimized Nanosuit controls, fine-tuned combat and full stereoscopic 3D support.

UPDATE 1:
Crytek boss Cevat Yerli has confirmed that Crysis will launch as a PlayStation Network and Xbox Live title.


"For many years people were asking, can you do Crysis 1 on consoles?" he told GameTrailers. "We have been secretly working on that for a while. It's a digital download only. It looks just awesome, I believe."

ORIGINAL STORY: Sci-fi first-person shooter Crysis launches on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 next month.


The game, which first launched on PC in 2007, is described as "remastered" in its debut GameTrailers exclusive video.


It has "all new lighting", "all new effects" and "all new Nanosuit controls".


Eurogamer's Crysis review shot a 9/10. "This is a game that feels supremely engineered, like a precision machine, or a German automobile," Jim Rossignol wrote.

Shacknews - Alice O'Connor

Two months after a console version of Crysis was spotted in a ratings database, Crytek has announced a "remastered" version of the original Crysis for Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network this October. Though Crysis 2 hit Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 as well, the 2007 original was only ever released on PC.

"For many years, people were asking, can you do Crysis 1 on consoles?" CEO Cervat Yerli told GameTrailers TV. "And we have been secretly working on that for a while."

The announcement trailer notes that the console edition of Crysis has been "remastered with all new lighting" as well as new effects and Nanosuit controls. Like Crysis 2, the console version will offer full stereoscopic 3D support. One speculates that it'll be built upon the Crysis 2-powering CryEngine 3, given all the work that went into optimizing that for consoles.

Crysis 2 will be available on XBLA and PSN for 1600 Microsoft Points/$19.99.

Kotaku

Four Years Later, Crysis Comes to ConsoleYes, but can your console run Crysis?



There's been talk of this happening for years (no surprise, given the fact the game is four years old!), but it's finally happening: PC benchmark Crysis is coming to the PS3 and Xbox 360.



It'll be out next month (talk about short notice!), and has a few new features courtesy of developers Crytek's advances over the past four years, including new lighting and new effects.



The clip below is showing the 360 version, and for the 360 version, it looks pretty damn good. Not top of the range PC good, but then, an Xbox 360 isn't a top of the range PC.





Get More: GameTrailers.com, Crysis - Exclusive Debut PS3/Xbox 360 Trailer HD, PC Games, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360







You can contact Luke Plunkett, the author of this post, at plunkett@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku





width="500" height="333" allowscriptaccess="always"
allowfullscreen="true">

Thanks to Adam over at Rock, Paper, Shotgun for pointing out The Worry of Newport, a Crysis mod that turns the tropical shooter into a slow, moody traipse through a drab seaside village.



Which looks cooler than it sounds.



Set in and around the town of Newport, it's all about exploration. And listening, as the game boasts a narrator to help give things a little context. And interactive flashbacks. And, sometimes—when things get a little scary—combat as well.



You can find download instructions at the link below.



The Worry of Newport [ModDB, via Rock, Paper, Shotgun]





You can contact Luke Plunkett, the author of this post, at plunkett@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...That Darth Vader line has always creeped me out a little. This stuff, though, featuring a pair of storyboard artists working in the games industry, does nothing of the sort.



After I ran that Crysis 2 art last week, I was contacted by Trudi Castle, another artist who worked on the game. Unlike the static pieces we generally feature here on Fine Art, though, Trudi had provided some storyboards for the game, to illustrate its more cinematic moments.



Providing the others? Trudi's twin sister Astrid.



It's cool the pair aren't just working in the same industry but on the same projects (though Trudi has since worked on Halo Anniversary), but even cooler is they've given us the chance to show off some of the other kinds of art that go into making a video game. Sure, "traditional" 2D concept art looks pretty and is the building block of most games, but it's not the only creative work that goes into the building of a virtual world; people like animators and, here, storyboard artists do their part too.



After all, cinematic sequences (even in-engine ones, like these) don't just happen. Somebody has to plan them out!



To see the larger pics in all their glory, either click the "expand" icon on the gallery screen or right click and "open link in new tab".



Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists. If you're in the business and have some concept, environment or character art you'd like to share, drop us a line!

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Astrid Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle

Sister...This Storyboard Artist Has a Twin Sister...By Trudi Castle


Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Adam Smith)

But more wonderful than the lore of old men and the lore of books is the secret lore of ocean.I use the word potential> all the time. To the extent that it becomes annoying to the people around me. But it is an important word, especially in this still youthful industry. It’s locked in the bizarre ideas forming in the mind and on the hard drive of the smallest indie developer, and it’s evident in the expanding technical prowess of the largest blockbusters. It’s not just in the future though. I also love the potential of what already exists, the engines that have been built and the histories they have produced. And that’s why I love mods. They can make the old new in so many ways: balancing, tweaking, expanding, subverting, or being something self-contained and entirely new. Take The Worry of Newport. It’s a self-contained, Lovecraftian mystery that’s pretending to be a mod for Crysis. (more…)

Kotaku

The People and Places of Crysis 2Today at Fine Art we're looking at the work of Daniel Rizea, who in the last few years has provided art for games like Crysis, Crysis 2 and Crytek's upcoming fantasy title Ryse.



Rizea hasn't always been at the PC powerhouse; he got his start at Ubisoft, where he worked on Blazing Angels, Silent Hunter IV and Hawx.



We've showcased some Crysis 2 concept art here before, the work of two of Crytek's other artists, Dennis Chan and Viktor Jonsson; to see that stuff, which consists mostly of environmental designs (these being a mix of scenery, characters and vehicles), head here.



Meanwhile, you can check out Rizea's personal site below.



Concept Art [Daniel Rizea]



To see the larger pics in all their glory, either click the "expand" icon on the gallery screen or right click and "open link in new tab".



Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists. If you're in the business and have some concept, environment or character art you'd like to share, drop us a line!

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2

The People and Places of Crysis 2


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