Kotaku

There's A Hilarious Reason They Called The Game Warface



Warface? WARFACE. The people behind one of gaming's most preposterous titles—a free-to-play shooter that somehow manages to combine the words "War" and "Face" without cracking a smile—have explained the rationale behind their decision.



Speaking to Rock Paper Shotgun in a recent Q&A (which is worth a read!), Crytek boss Cevat Yerli answers the most important question of all: why the hell did they call one of their games Warface?




Because I think it's very personal. I think it's a very social experience. Yes, it's a very strange word combination, but I wanted to express that it's a truly social FPS game. It's about war on a different scale—between corporate entities—but also, it's a shooter between you and your friends. That implies so many new kinds of possibilities with the social technology that we've invested over the last five years to build. So that's why we as a company keep going back to "face." It's very personal.




WARFACE: IT'S PERSONAL.


PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to GameFly End of the World sale chops 75 percent off XCOM, Witcher 2, others">GameFly End of the World sale







When facing the end of time as we know it through a cataclysmic prophecy, it's time for a sale to mark history's end with a bang. To wit, GameFly's End of the World event nixes 75 percent off select titles for the next 12 days, providing valuable buys such as a $15/£9 Witcher 2, a $25/£15.50 XCOM: Enemy Unknown, and $12.50/£8 for The Walking Dead, among others.



More games will appear throughout the sale's duration, but current offerings include Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic for $2.50/£1.60, Batman: Arkham Asylum for $10/£6, and Crysis for $7.50/£4.70.



If you haven't yet taken shelter in your fallout bunker cheered at the increasing arrival of awesome holiday sales, Origin's Green Monday sale are still around for just one more day with 40 percent off on tons of noteworthy titles such as Battlefield 3 ($24/£15), Crusader Kings II ($24/£15), and The Sims 3 ($18/£11). Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a couple of asteroid-repelling planks to board up.
PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Crytek: Free-to-play future “isn’t mutually exclusive”">Crysis 3 Ceph-thrower







Crytek CEO Cevat Yerli's enthusiasm for incorporating burgeoning free-to-play business models into the PC-melting Crysis franchise is about as strong as a nano-maxed punch. Like hunting space squids with a bow and arrow, though, such a marriage takes time. In an interview with Rock, Paper, Shotgun, Yerli believed that the free-to-play future he envisions "won't happen tomorrow" and Prophet-ized a peaceful coexistence between free and fee.



“I don’t think F2P’s a mutually exclusive way of looking at things," he explained. "I mean, the future is definitely free-to-play, but likewise, retail can co-exist with it. Premium games can be free-to-play. When I said free-to-play’s gonna be our future, I meant that and I hold to it. But I didn’t mean it for tomorrow.



"When I say there will inevitably be only free-to-play games, I mean that there might be ones where you can just download them with a free-to-play business model, or you can go to the store and buy it for $60. So that’s what I meant: There’s gonna be free-to-play available, which brings the entry level down to zero from a price perspective.”



Yerli also revealed prior considerations for turning Crysis 2's multiplayer into a free-to-play standalone while packaging Alcatraz's journey as priced content, but the final product wound up combining both in the traditional retail combo. Crysis 3—which de-cloaked its North American February 19/European February 22 release dates today—will follow suit, but Yerli hopes for something a little less spendy in the future.



"My desire is that everybody can just play Crysis and don’t have to spend money from day one," he said. "So people don’t have to think, ‘Oh, do I really want to pay $50 for that game?’ I don’t want that question to be asked. I just want them to be able to give it a try. And then they can make their choices about spending money. That’s honestly why I’m most excited about free-to-play: Regardless of storytelling, single-player, multiplayer, and co-op experiences, I think there’s an answer to all of those problems.”
PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Voting has begun for ModDB’s 2012 Mod of the Year award nominees">moddb







Clear your schedule and make room on your hard drive: there are over 9000 mods up for consideration as ModDB's 2012 Mod of the Year award nominees, and only a little over five days to nominate them. A big green button on each mod's page makes it hard to miss the opportunity to give your favorites a bump.



There isn't much time, so we'll get straight to it after this obligatory acknowledgement that we said "over 9000" on the internet: tee hee, references. Moving on, DayZ and Black Mesa are tough to ignore, and The Sith Lords Restored Content Mod was a valiant community effort. Those might be the most talked about and praised mods this year, and we expect they'll secure nominations, but there are so many more that deserve recognition. Which are you voting for?



If you need a refresher, you might want to browse our recent mod coverage to see if you've missed any driving elephants or My Little Pony conversions.
PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Crysis 3′s advanced graphics settings revealed, high-res textures at launch confirmed">Crysis-3-3-1024x576







Following reveal of Crysis 3's system requirements over the weekend, I’ve received confirmation from EA and Crytek of which precious secondary settings we'll be able to tweak in the game. If you remember, Crysis 2 launched with an anemic four tweakable options: v-sync, game resolution, HUD bobbing, and a general quality setting. A patch after release expanded these, and fan-made utilities helped out, but the good news is that EA and Crytek aren't shipping Crysis 3 in the same state.



Here's what you'll see if you click on "Advanced Graphics Options" in Crysis 3.



Game Effects

Object

Particles

Post Processing

Shading

Shadows

Water

Anisotropic Filtering

Texture Resolution

Motion Blur Amount

Lens Flares



Crysis 3's "Advanced Graphics Options" menu.



Noteworthy among these is the inclusion of high-resolution textures at release. Also different from Crysis 2's current advanced settings menu are discrete settings for lens flares and anisotropic filtering. Below, a quick chat on the topic with Marco Corbetta, Technical Director on Crysis 3.



PCG: Why did you launch Crysis 2 on PC with only a handful of graphics settings?



Marco Corbetta: On Crysis 2, a decision was made to focus on console, launching the title on all platforms simultaneously and bringing the same console UI menu experience to PC, but with a plan to release a dedicated DX11 PC version right after launch of the multiplatform version. Although most PC settings were already available at launch, just not directly exposed through the menu, the DX11 PC-focused version had all settings available directly in the menu and additional features like hi-res textures, tessellation etc. However, getting out the DX11 version with all the features included that we didn’t have time to develop while working on the console versions, took much longer than expected.



Is there any specific technical area of the game that’s been enhanced since C2?



Corbetta: As I mentioned, Crysis 3 will already ship with hi-res textures, advanced graphics settings, tessellation and DX11 support. Additional tech areas that have been enhanced since Crysis 2 are: AI navigation system, animation system, water, fog volumes, cloud shadows, POM, AA, cloths, vegetation, particles, lens flares and grass.



For Crysis 3, the past year has involved a lot of performance and memory optimization work on many areas and for all platforms, as well as work on the rendering side. One of our big goals was to improve image quality, and a lot of work went into developing several DX11 based anti-aliasing techniques for PC, which means gamers will now be able to pick their favorite—this is relatively involved on a deferred-based engine, since it involves selecting every technique and accessing multi-sampled buffers, versus the usual "flip the switch" approach. On top of an improved tessellation system we've also introduced character/vegetation tessellation—and since tessellation performance was still not optimal for the level of detail we wanted to achieve, we also did research into different areas and introduced what we called “Pixel Accurate Displacement Mapping” for macro details with nice real-time self-shadowing.



Can you describe the technology driving the grass system in C3? What distinguishes your tech from other games’ grass rendering?



Corbetta: This tech allows us to visualize thousands of individual blades of grass, and is very cost and memory efficient as we can even achieve good results on older console hardware like 360 and PS3. One of the most important things is that this technology is improving gameplay. For example, you can see AI aliens running through the fields and bending individual blades of grass, and things such as projectiles, explosions and wind affect grass movement too. This gives a “predator-style” gameplay experience in the Fields level, which is very in line with the experience C3 wants to offer. There are not many other games that can offer this kind of realistic grass simulation and rendering on a multiplatform basis.
Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alec Meer)

Bet it won't be as good as Far Cry 3. Though I have no evidence to back up that statement, as yet

We don’t usually do system requirements posts, but when it comes to Crytek they do have a history of basically telling us all that our PCs are rubbish and outdated. Granted, while once it was the high watermark of e-willy waving, the Crysis series hasn’t of late been the technical Goliath/Mephistopheles it once was. Does that change with the upcoming Crysis 3? You know how this works. (more…)

Kotaku





width="500" height="333" allowscriptaccess="always"
allowfullscreen="true">

Being the result of a corporate partnership between Intel, VICE magazine, Kill Screen and whatever studio is being covered, the new Behind The Scenes web series should be the very worst in developer diaries.



But it's not. It's really well done. I mean, yeah, in parts they're selling you on Crysis 3, but for the most part it really is more of a proper documentary, giving you a genuine look at the studio and the people behind it.



The first episode is above, with installments on Forza Horizon and Gears of War to come.



Behind The Scenes of Crysis 3 with Kill Screen [YouTube]


PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Crysis 3 trailer and screenshots show laser sky turrets, exploding arrows, and sexy grass">psycho







Psycho has put on a little weight, hasn't he? Then again, he's lost his Nanosuit, and along with it its maximum slimming effect. Anyway, here's 6:19 of fresh gameplay footage from Crysis 3's domed jungles of New York, a setting that has the game resembling the genetic output of Crysis's East Asia and Crysis 2's urbanity.



One change in Crysis 3 worth noting, and noticeable in the footage: Crytek has decoupled sprinting from energy consumption. It still has a separate, invisible cooldown associated with it (and while you're cloaked, your energy meter will tick down faster if you run), but running won't take sips from your magic power juicebox. A related counter to this are the new EMP grenades carried by CELL soldiers, which drain your battery.



Crysis 3 is due in February.



http://youtu.be/dG7rnHrgxWU











PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Next Crysis won’t be called Crysis 4, “F2P is our inevitable future,” says Crytek">Crysis 3 bow attack







The Crysis saga will endure beyond Crysis 3's culminating events, but not under the name Crysis 4, CryTek has revealed. Speaking to Eurogamer, Crytek CEO Cevat Yerli discussed the future of the visually voluptuous franchise beyond Crysis 3 and mentioned a future free-to-play version of Crysis.



“I wouldn't name it Crysis 4 at this stage because it would be misleading," he said. "We want to finalize Prophet's story, and Crysis 4 would imply the story just moves on. But we are excited about the DNA of Crysis and of the franchise. There can be literally tons of titles out there within the franchise. Unlike Far Cry, this time around we feel very flexible about Crysis."



Normally Crytek would already be beginning pre-production on the next Crysis, but Yerli says the next iteration's "radical" direction could mean more of a lull between it and Crysis 3.



"Because we want to make this something much more radical and new, we're looking at it as a bit more of a long-term thing," Yerli explained. "It's too early to talk about it for these reasons."



Yerli equipped an equally strong silencer on any details surrounding the free-to-play Crysis project, as its infancy prevented any solid information from emerging.



"We do have a plan for a F2P version of Crysis, but how this looks and when this will be done, whether this is the next one or the next next one, is to be decided," he said. "I believe F2P is our inevitable future. I believe there are F2P titles out there that can be story-telling and cooperative with your friends and competitive with your friends. It's all possible. The business model is independent from the way you design games. It's a very important thing. People always make these things dependent, but it's actually completely independent."
Kotaku

Computer Security Research Team Finds Vulnerabilities in Modern Warfare 3 The same security company that found a security flaw in Steam earlier this year has found security holes in Modern Warfare 3 and CryEngine 3.



As ComputerWorld reports, researchers from security company ReVuln announced their findings at a security conference in Seoul today. They demonstrated two major issues. The first was with Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 which, according to the presentation, is open to malicious denial of service (DDoS) attacks that can crash the game servers.



The other major issue was found in Crytek's CryEngine 3, and demonstrated on the game Nexuiz. The research team was able to access a remote player's computer via the game servers and "caused a graphic of cat riding a rocket to be displayed on the victim's computer."



If only all hackers sent cat pictures.



Of course, as a security company, it's in ReVuln's interest to point out security flaws, even minute ones, in any software they can. The company is planning to release full advisories about their findings next Tuesday, to coincide with the launch of the next Call of Duty game, Black Ops II.



Researchers find vulnerability in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 [Computer World via Polygon]


...