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Shacknews - Shack Staff

First thing's first: to access the Sunken King content, you need the Dragon Talon item. Make sure you obtained it from purchasing the DLC. With it in hand, you can go to the Black Gulch and find the room where you fought the Rotten. The rightward wall has a room that leads to the Primal Bonfire. Find an obelisk in the back, and it will take you to the DLC area. Before you go in, make sure you have plenty of ranged attacks for this area. They're helpful for both combat and puzzle challenges.


Shulva, Sanctum City


Once you enter the area, head down the path and ignore the huge dragon above you. You'll come to a bonfire, and right beyond that is your first enemy encounter. It's just a single one, so dispatch it quickly and continue going up the hill. Here you'll see a glowing pillar on the left, so hit it to raise a structure and hurt the enemies nearby. Head forward--you can't make it to the areas on the left anyway--and then take out the three enemies before moving on again.


When you crest the top of the hill, four more enemies will be waiting for you. They're all ranged, so respond with your own range or close the gap to melee them quickly. Grab the Lifegems from the second hill, and then hit the glowing pillar to raise another structure. You'll have to move quickly to get to the structure as it rises, but being at the top will let you jump ahead to find a Dark Quartz Ring +3.


You can now reach another set of enemies in the lower area, so take them out and pick up a Poison Stone item. You'll see stairs on the far side, so head up them into a room full of red objects. Attack them with your ranged equipment to nullify their dangerous effects, and then go into the room to pick up some Goldenfruit Balms. You'll also find a couple of insect enemies, so take them out and then use the door on the right. Some enemies might notice you, but whether they do or not you should used ranged equipment to defeat them. 


Head through the doorway on the other side to find a few Old Growth Bombs. You can use the ledge to the right of the doorway to reach them, but you'll need to time your jumps very carefully. Collect them or not; either way you'll go through the staircase back to the entrance area. You'll find a pillar next to the white crystal formation, which you can use to get back to the first bonfire. Use a ranged attack to deal with the insect on the far wall, and then head inside the structure to find another enemy. Defeat it and go upstairs to find a Poisonbite Ring +1. 


Now you have a choice. You can go left to beat the last enemy, or just continue forward, or drop down to find five Lightning Urns. When you're ready to move forward, to back towards the room with the red objects and get to the structure above the pots. Hit the glowing pillars to raise a walkway, then hit another glowing picture to raise the next structure. 


You can now drop down to the ledge below. Some insects are on the second floor, so if you have a ranged attack you can beat them easily from here. Once they're beaten, go upstairs to find the Elizabethan Mushroom. You can drop through the other opening here to go down to level 1A.


1A


Go down the stairs to find the walking poison statue near a wall. Attack its feet to do damage; this kind of attack is easiest with a ranged weapon, again. You'll find 20 Throwing Knives and 5 Cracked Red Eye Orbs near where it was originally standing, and then find one more enemy to the left. Once they're finished, head down the stairs. 


Just beyond the stairs, there's a ramp to the left that leads to the Dragon's Sanctum and Cave of the Dead. For now, proceed forward to find a small set of stairs that lead to a building on the left. Take down the enemy and go through the doorway, then head down the path to the right to find a Sanctum Mace. Go back down the stairs to find fur more enemies, after which you'll find three Twinkling Titanite on the ground. Take out another poison stone enemy, then climb up the ladder nearby. Cross the rooftops to find another bonfire, and then find a Dried Root through the doorway. Drop down to return to the beginning of the area. 


Go down the stairs and then to the right, and continue down the ramp. You'll find two more enemies here, so beat them and then go across the bridge and down another set of stairs. 


Take the stairs to the left to cross the bridge. You'll see two enemies there who will be killed by a dragon. If you have a ranged attack, though, you can beat them before you reach that area. Break some pots and then head across.


Dragon's Sanctum


Go down the stairs and hit the switch on the left to find a Soul of a Great Hero and three Dragon Charms. Get them adn then head through the hallway on the other side. Use your ranged weapon to do as much damage as you can to the enemy just ahead, then go down the stairs to the left to finish him off. Two more enemies are in this room as well, but first focus on attacking the bodies on the altars. Open the five chests in this room to get a Titanite Slab, five Old Growth Balms, one Soul Vessel, one Catarina Helm, and 50 Destructive Greatarrows.


A few more enemies will fight you in the next hallway. They have long reach, so make sure you give yourself some space to fight them by entering the previous area. Defeat them, and then head into the hallway again. Be careful for the pressure plate in the middle of the hallway. Two more enemies in here will be "sleeping," so hit them for as much damage as you can before going further.


Be careful not to head too far down this next hallway, or a sorceress will attack you. Fight the two enemies near the entrance first so you won't have to deal with them and the corceress all at once. Once you've dealt with them, open the coffer and have your shield at the ready to prevent damage from a series of arrows. You'll find a Bonfire Ascetic inside. 


You can pick up a Human Effigy from the far wall, then use your ranged attacks to kill an enemy visible through the hole in the door. You can then step on a pressure stone to rotate the door. Do this repeatedly until the large opening is at the bottom, and then head through. Go down the hallway and stairs, and then head left at the junction to find a Repair Powder. Continue straight, jump over the gap, and head down until you find a closed doorway. Use ranged to hit the switch and then go through the opening. Then, head down the hall and use a ranged attack on the switch. 


Go through the doorway that just opened and deal with the melee enemy before dealing with some others on the far side. Approach the top of the stairs cautiously, since there's a pressure switch that triggers a spike trap. Go down another set of stairs to find a Soul of a Hero and Human Effigy, along with three chests that have three Boltstones, three Bleed Stones, three Twinkling Titanite, three Petrified Dragon Bones, and a Puzzling Stone Sword. You have t have hit the switch on the previous hallway to access the Puzzling Stone Sword.


Go back to the hole you jumped over before, and this time fall through it. Move away from the sharp corner, and instead go down the stairs while being careful of the spikes. Use ranged attacks from the stairs to take down the enemy, or just get his attention so he walks into the spikes himself. Navigate carefully through the spikes to get several items. Near the first enemy are three torches, and the far right has Twinkling Titanite, five Holy Water Urns, a Human Effigy, and a Dragon Stone in a chest that can be accessed by hitting a switch on one of the pillars. You can take a narrow path between two sets of spikes to go towards a boss battle, but first you should go up the ladder on the right side. Climb up, defeat the sorceress, then head forward to fight another sorceress. Then you can turn around and head to the end of the path to get to a bonfire, and go past it to find the Sanctum Crossbow.


Go back where you came from and take down the sorceress. Another enemy is in spirit form. Go to the right of the entrance to another bridge, and then down the broken stairs to find a Bloodbite Ring +1. Go back up the stairs and fto the left to find a room with three more spirit enemies. Attack the statues to make them materialize, and then defeat them. Head down to find an Eternal Sanctum Key and a Sanctum Knight Helm. Then go back into the area with spikes and up the stairs to the sharp corner, and into the next area.

Shacknews - Ozzie Mejia

The first teaser for BioWare's next game was... weird. Other than the tagline (title?) of "You've Been Chosen," the trailer indicated nothing about what the studio's next game is even supposed to be.


The latest trailer released today is more of the same strangeness, containing more live action footage centered around the idea of being observed by a strange entity. This time, however, BioWare is giving this new video the "announcement of an announcement" treatment, pointing to more details set to come on August 13 at GamesCom.


In the meantime, check out the video below. And just like last time, you are also prompted to visit the game's website.


Shacknews - Robert Workman

When Sony initially announced its PlayStation Now service earlier this year, gamers were elated. After all, it's not every day that you get the opportunity to cloud stream earlier game experiences onto a shiny new PlayStation 4. Plus, God of War: Ascension looked really good on it, with barely any skips in performance.


Then came the private beta for it, which launched a little while back, and, well, the results haven't exactly been mesmerizing. For some, the service barely connected at all; for others, the offering of a lackluster game library (are we really going to play Ben 10's greatest hits?) and sky-high rental prices doused any remaining excitement for the service.


Now, with PlayStation Now going into public beta today, users will be able to test the experience for themselves. However, before Sony sets it live with an official release, there are a few things it'll need to do to assure it's a success. Otherwise, we could be looking at a similar blunder to what happened with OnLIve. Yes, we're serious.


Lower the pricing (significantly)


First off, let's discuss pricing. Right now, Crazy Taxi, a game that came out several years ago as a PS3/360 downloadable title, came out at around $10. Reasonable? Absolutely. But not on the PlayStation Now service.


That's because the rental rates for the game are abysmal. To check it out for a seven-day period, you'll need to fork over $5. To check it out for over 30 days, you'll need to pay…$22.99? So, practically more than twice what the initial game was worth.


With the public beta, Sony needs to do some serious house cleaning. For instance, a seven day rental rate of $1.99 and a 30 day rental rate of $4.99 is MUCH more fathomable, especially if you want players to come back to that game experience. The more people you scare off with high prices, the less that are likely to be repeat shoppers with it.


Here's hoping Sony's lived and learned with the beta, because otherwise, you're going to have a lot of folks refusing to pay $30 to rent something like…Red Faction: Armageddon? You're joking, yes?


Perk up the game library


PlayStation Now has some decent titles, like the aforementioned games above, but it also has a bunch of lacking ones, including MX Vs. ATV Reflex and, again, the dreaded Ben 10 library. Also, is there really a need to re-release Guacamelee! for the service when a better version is available for download? Me thinks not.


Sony needs to find a way to boost its game library, and pronto. Don't be afraid to throw some quality games in there, such as Sly Cooper: Thieves In Time (a truly deserving classic that needs an audience on PS4), and the Uncharted trilogy. Stuff that matters.


For good measure, the PlayStation Now service would be excellent when it comes to classic compilations. Jak and Daxter, Ratchet & Clank, Ico/Shadow of the Colossus and others would be PERFECT for this package, letting players check out what they missed and maybe even prompting them to pursue a PS3 purchase. Sony wins both ways.


It should give this some thought. Because not everyone is going to want to download Space Channel 5 Part 2 over and over…


Fill the library with PS1 and PS2 games


Remember when Sony initially announced that PlayStation 1 and 2 games would be part of the PlayStation Now library? Hey, great. So where are they? Throughout the beta, we've only experienced games that were released for PlayStation 3, and when it comes to older hits, they're left out in the cold.


Sony needs to keep its word and release games from both of those platforms. After all, there's a huge classic audience out there that would truly appreciate them. Even long-lost gems like Klonoa 2 and Twisted Metal Black would be right at home on the system.


Offer a subscription plan


Sony said that it's working on some form of subscription plan for the PlayStation Now service, where gamers can download an unlimited amount of titles at their free will. However, what it really needs to do is incorporate said plan into PlayStation Plus, incorporating power players with some form of premium discount (or, hey, maybe even a free perk) so that they can enjoy it more thoroughly.


After all, EA Access plans to be a program that works on a membership basis, and for a pretty good value. So, surely, Sony can do the same.

Shacknews - Ozzie Mejia

Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn recently released its robust 2.3 update, so now's as good a time as any to try and recruit some new blood. Starting today, Square Enix is offering newcomers on PC the opportunity to jump into the game for a free 14-day trial, albeit with a few restrictions.


New users can simply download the free trial software from the game's website. The trial will last for 14 calendar days from the day it was downloaded. Players can play up to level 20 and free trial characters can only earn up to 20,000 Gil. There are a number of other restrictions, including trades, retainers, Moogle Delivery Service and other features are a no-go for free trial users. The full list of restrictions can be found here.


While the free trial is only for PC users, should those users upgrade to the full version, their character can then be transferred to the PS3 and PS4 versions of the game.

Shacknews - Steven Wong

Assassin's Creed: Unity handles the theme of revolution in a couple of different ways. On the surface is the backdrop of the French Revolution, a bloody era of world history marked by extreme violence. On another level, Unity is a sort of revolution for the Assassin's Creed series. It's the first game for the new generation of console systems, and the development team at Ubisoft is rebuilding the game from the ground up with emphasis on the core gameplay mechanics like Parkour, stalking, observing, and executing. Additionally, Unity supports much requested cooperative gameplay. We talked to Alex Amancio, creative director for Assassin's Creed Unity, from the Ubisoft Summer Showcase in New York City to get a deeper sense of what makes Unity brings the series into a new generation.



An Assassin's Tale


Unity's narrative puts emphasis on the main character, Arno, his journey toward redemption, and growing from a novice to a master assassin. To this end, the gameplay has been significantly changed up. The first thing players might noticed is the streamlined Parkour system that lets players wall run diagonally. Controlled ascent allows assassins to make their way up and down walls at the push of a button. The goal is to preserve fluidity of movement and to get around quickly. To this end, Arno will also have a dedicated stealth stance, so that players can stick to cover and quietly make their way through areas.


Players are transported to Paris France during the French Revolution, specifically a period called The Terror, when there was a lot of chaos in the streets and hundreds were beheaded. Unity only takes place in Paris, but the city is gigantic. To put things into perspective, the city is roughly the same size as all of Black Flag's islands put together. Despite its size, Paris won't have any load screens. So moving from one area to the next should happen seamlessly.


Another interesting aspect of the city is how there are rarely any guards patrolling the rooftops. Keeping with the theme of the eagle looking down at its prey, the area above Paris belongs to the assassins so that they can look down at its streets and plan their moves. Rooftops also make for a quick means of breaking line of sight when the player is caught. That way, they can choose to restart the stealth loop instead of ending encounters with combat.



Combat is also getting a significant overhaul. It will be a sort of rock, paper, scissors system where players will have to balance between attacking, dodging and parrying according to the type of foe they're fighting. Fighting will be challenging, but not in an annoying way. The player's chances of survival decrease significantly if they're surrounded by enemies. So, it is best to choose your battles and try to keep combat to a minimum whenever possible.


Engaging in city-wide activities like rescuing citizens, running down thieves, or taking on side missions for experience points and gear. Points are used to purchase different skills, like lockpicking, for Arno to carve his way through the city. Completing side missions, like murder mysteries, could earn extra gear to add to Arno's arsenal. For the first time, assassin gear has special properties, like a hood that lets players disappear into crowds faster. Weapons have different stats to compliment varying fighting styles.


Crowd mentality


There are three factions to keep an eye on in Unity. The two main ones are the Guards and Extremists. Guards are out to restore order to the city while Extremists are just out to stir up trouble. The third group is the crowd of citizens going through their everyday lives in Paris. They might not be an official faction, but they are too numerous to be ignored and make up some of the most important aspects of the game.


Street crowds can be made up of 2,000 to 5,000 characters. The largest scene in the game has about 10,000. The crowd reacts to the player's actions and what happens around them. Since the majority of them are unarmed civilians, seeing Arno assassinate a target could send them running away like a stampeding herd. Some civilians carry weapons, and they may randomly engage in combat with Extremists or assist Arno depending on what he's doing. A citizen might be walking down a street, run into someone he knows, talk for a bit, and join his friend in walking; thee way real-life people would. Unpredictable crowd behavior is a persistent aspect of Unity, and will even occur during missions.


Co-op kills


Although cooperative play is the most requested feature among fans, it's actually one that works against the core mechanics of a game. Assassination missions don't improve with numbers. Having four players makes it four times more likely to be caught. So, to accommodate cooperative play, the developers had to rethink their approach toward designing the game.



Similar to how Watch Dogs works, all players see themselves as Arno, and all others as random members of the Brotherhood. They all come together at cafes and embark one of eleven special Brotherhood missions that are separate from the main campaign. No one wants to sit through lengthy cutscenes while playing a cooperative game, so the intro videos are quick and only supply players with what they need to know in order to complete the mission.


Mission chains are also antithetical to cooperative play, because one player will inevitably fall behind in the storyline. To overcome this, each Brotherhood mission is a self-contained story with an expansive open-ended map.


There are four different multiplayer skills that can unlocked that let players tank with more armor, fight with better weapons proficiency, or scout an area using enhanced stealth to mark targets. When combined with gear, players can spec themselves out to fully fit into their roles. Synergy happens when four players come together, each using a different skill set, to complement one another. That way, missions can be replayed with different approaches, or a different number of assassins, and each playthrough will be unique.


The revolution kicks off on October 28th, when Assassin's Creed: Unity releases for the Xbox One, PS4 and PC.



Shacknews - Steven Wong

Assassin's Creed: Unity handles the theme of revolution in a couple of different ways. On the surface is the backdrop of the French Revolution, a bloody era of world history marked by extreme violence. On another level, Unity is a sort of revolution for the Assassin's Creed series. It's the first game for the new generation of console systems, and the development team at Ubisoft is rebuilding the game from the ground up with emphasis on the core gameplay mechanics like Parkour, stalking, observing, and executing. Additionally, Unity supports much requested cooperative gameplay. We talk to Alex Amancio, creative director for Assassin's Creed Unity, from the Ubisoft Summer Showcase in New York City to get a deeper sense of what makes Unity brings the series into a new generation.



An Assassin's Tale


Unity's narrative puts emphasis on the main character, Arno, his journey toward redemption, and growing from a novice to a master assassin. To this end, the gameplay has been significantly changed up. The first thing players might noticed is the streamlined Parkour system that lets players wall run diagonally. Controlled ascent allows assassins to make their way up and down walls at the push of a button. The goal is to preserve fluidity of movement and to get around quickly. To this end, Arno will also have a dedicated stealth stance, so that players can stick to cover and quietly make their way through areas.


Players are transported to Paris France during the French Revolution, specifically a period called The Terror, when there was a lot of chaos in the streets and hundreds were beheaded. Unity only takes place in Paris, but the city is gigantic. To put things into perspective, the city is roughly the same size as all of Black Flag's islands put together. Despite its size, Paris won't have any load screens. So moving from one area to the next should happen seamlessly.


Another interesting aspect of the city is how there are rarely any guards patrolling the rooftops. Keeping with the theme of the eagle looking down at its prey, the area above Paris belongs to the assassins so that they can look down at its streets and plan their moves. Rooftops also make for a quick means of breaking line of sight when the player is caught. That way, they can choose to restart the stealth loop instead of ending encounters with combat.



Combat is also getting a significant overhaul. It will be a sort of rock, paper, scissors system where players will have to balance between attacking, dodging and parrying according to the type of foe they're fighting. Fighting will be challenging, but not in an annoying way. The player's chances of survival decrease significantly if they're surrounded by enemies. So, it is best to choose your battles and try to keep combat to a minimum whenever possible.


Engaging in city-wide activities like rescuing citizens, running down thieves, or taking on side missions for experience points and gear. Points are used to purchase different skills, like lockpicking, for Arno to carve his way through the city. Completing side missions, like murder mysteries, could earn extra gear to add to Arno's arsenal. For the first time, assassin gear has special properties, like a hood that lets players disappear into crowds faster. Weapons have different stats to compliment varying fighting styles.


Crowd mentality


There are three factions to keep an eye on in Unity. The two main ones are the Guards and Extremists. Guards are out to restore order to the city while Extremists are just out to stir up trouble. The third group is the crowd of citizens going through their everyday lives in Paris. They might not be an official faction, but they are too numerous to be ignored and make up some of the most important aspects of the game.


Street crowds can be made up of 2,000 to 5,000 characters. The largest scene in the game has about 10,000. The crowd reacts to the player's actions and what happens around them. Since the majority of them are unarmed civilians, seeing Arno assassinate a target could send them running away like a stampeding herd. Some civilians carry weapons, and they may randomly engage in combat with Extremists or assist Arno depending on what he's doing. A citizen might be walking down a street, run into someone he knows, talk for a bit, and join his friend in walking; thee way real-life people would. Unpredictable crowd behavior is a persistent aspect of Unity, and will even occur during missions.


Co-op kills


Although cooperative play is the most requested feature among fans, it's actually one that works against the core mechanics of a game. Assassination missions don't improve with numbers. Having four players makes it four times more likely to be caught. So, to accommodate cooperative play, the developers had to rethink their approach toward designing the game.



Similar to how Watch Dogs works, all players see themselves as Arno, and all others as random members of the Brotherhood. They all come together at cafes and embark one of eleven special Brotherhood missions that are separate from the main campaign. No one wants to sit through lengthy cutscenes while playing a cooperative game, so the intro videos are quick and only supply players with what they need to know in order to complete the mission.


Mission chains are also antithetical to cooperative play, because one player will inevitably fall behind in the storyline. To overcome this, each Brotherhood mission is a self-contained story with an expansive open-ended map.


There are four different multiplayer skills that can unlocked that let players tank with more armor, fight with better weapons proficiency, or scout an area using enhanced stealth to mark targets. When combined with gear, players can spec themselves out to fully fit into their roles. Synergy happens when four players come together, each using a different skill set, to complement one another. That way, missions can be replayed with different approaches, or a different number of assassins, and each playthrough will be unique.


The revolution kicks off on October 28th, when Assassin's Creed: Unity releases for the Xbox One, PS4 and PC.



Shacknews - Ozzie Mejia

Update: It's over! But check out the video playthrough below.


The world has gone to hell and the only thing left is to survive. Humanity must not only fend off the infected that roam the streets, but must also survive against each other. It was a premise that engaged the gaming world in 2013 and now The Last of Us has made the trek to PlayStation 4 with The Last of Us: Remastered.


Join our own Sam Leichtamer and the rest of the Shacknews video crew, as we re-live Naughty Dog's phenomenon all over again. Check out the playthrough below or join us on the Shacknews Twitch channel.


Watch live video from Shacknews on Twitch

Shacknews - Ozzie Mejia

Riot Games has a large laundry list of changes in store for their MOBA giant League of Legends. The game's 4.13 patch will be one of the final patches before the upcoming League of Legends World Championships in September, so Riot is making sure it address a wide array of balance tweaks and changes, headlined by a change for support character Sona and assassin characters.


Sona will receive some notable buffs, with many ofher abilities receiving notable boosts to give her a greater sense of versatility.


"Sona's gameplay now revolves more around moments of power," explains Sona's update page. "Instead of hanging back and winning a war of attrition during laning, Sona's now got the kit to power up her allies and save their lives when a fight turns against them. Auras are smaller and more visible now, so getting the most of them requires great positional awareness for Sona and coordination with her allies. This allows us to reward great play with much more impact for each of her songs. You'll be able to make plays as Sona, earn your team kills and save lives with clutch ability casts and smart positioning. At the same time, the enemy team has larger windows to fight back in thanks to her longer cooldowns, adding in clarity and counterplay to Sona's kit."


Mages, assassins, and marksmen will also get some lower-end buffs, but the purpose of the patch is mainly to issue fixes across the board. For the full list of changes, check out the latest patch notes and watch the video below.


Shacknews - Ozzie Mejia

For the most part, 4X strategy games are among the most complex that one can find. It's a trend that Amplitude Studios isn't about to change with their latest effort, Endless Legend. However, with that complexity, Endless Legend offers the potential for a large playground that can be approached in a number of different ways. Shacknews recently had a chance to check out that complexity in person during a recent meeting with developer.


The premise for Endless Legend is that players explore an expansive, procedurally-generated planet. There are currently six factions (Wild Walker, Broken Lords, Vaulters, Necrophages, Ardent Mages, and Roving Clans) with two more to come before the game's launch. The landscape is begging to be explored, however the planet is also dying, meaning that the player's faction must help ensure the survival of their people before the world ultimately expires.



Like similar games in the genre, each decision adds to the player's story and affects how much influence the player's faction wields. Faction stories play out through a quest system that tells their tale, while side quests are also available to pick up at various points in the game.


What's most interesting about each of Endless Legends' factions is that they all come with strengths and weaknesses that don't necessarily have to do with warfare or fighting. As such, the game can be approached in a number of different ways. For example, the Roving Clans (one of the more recent additions to the game) are masters of commerce. Sure, the world may be coming to an end, but these merchants still have mouths to feed and they're happy to play the Dust-based economy to their advantage when building outwards. While they can't directly wage war on other factions, their greatest weapon is their influence, in the sense that they can bring factions to their knees through embargoes and other trade restrictions.


That's not to say there aren't factions that do excel on the battlefield, but Amplitude exercises some creativity here, as well. Necrophages, for instance, are a parasitic race that don't bother with diplomacy and set out to kill anything in sight, attacking in swarms. Broken Lords, on the other hand, fight for honor, however must collect as much Dust as possible, as it is the only element that can sustain them. In the latter class's case, the economy literally keeps them alive.


All of the game's factions will have their own respective units that adhere to their abilities, but as they proceed through the world, they can also assimilate minor factions to aid them. This helps factions make up for certain shortcomings, such as the Roving Clan's aforementioned inability to fight.


Battles all take place atop the game's overworld map, with players getting a deployment phase before sending out their troops. This is another area where Amplitude has shown some creativity, as battles can be influenced by the environmental layout. Elevation matters in battles and the side with the high ground gets a distinct advantage. Positioning means a lot, as Amplitude has purposely kept the battle phases as minimalistic as possible.



In keeping with the theme of following a timeline, Endless Legend doesn't bother with tech trees to grant bonuses. Instead, abilities are separated out into "eras," with none of them bound by any sort of prerequisite. Players can select ten tech abilities to progress to the next era, in which more powerful abilities will become available. The idea is to show a more organic form of progression and it's an interesting change from the standard tech tree that's present in other 4X games of this type.


Strategy fans will be intrigued by the sheer variety that Endless Legend has to offer, thanks to the drastically different classes and all the intricacies involved in pushing them forward. Amplitude stated that the average session doesn't last too long, meaning there's plenty of room to explore all of the game's classes. There's still more to come in the future, including the unrevealed final factions. In the meantime, those interested in giving the game a peek can jump into the game's beta on Steam Early Access. The final version of Endless Legend is expected to release later this summer.

Shacknews - Ozzie Mejia

Killer Instinct has had a banner first year under the direction of Double Helix and is about to expand even further with new overlords Iron Galaxy. But before they kick off Season 2 proper on Xbox One, Iron Galaxy and Microsoft would like to help fighting fans catch up with what they've missed by bringing Killer Instinct to retailers with a special compilation.


Dubbed "Killer Instinct: Combo Breaker Pack," the retail collection will feature all of the Season 1 fighters for $19.99, which matches the current digital price. It will also come with a special code for TJ Combo, the first Season 2 competitor.


The Killer Instinct: Combo Breaker Pack will hit stores on September 23. There's still no date for Season 2's arrival, but given that TJ Combo will be included as part of this pack, expect it to be very soon. There are also rumors swirling of a Killer Instinct Classic potentially on the horizon, too, potentially giving KI fans ever more to be excited about this year.

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