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The Infinite Sadness That Comes When the Game Updates EndRecently the developers of the procedural PC playground game Terraria announced that updates for the game would be ending. It was a crushing blow to commenter Jezuz. Share his desolation in today's Speak Up on Kotaku.



I'm... I'm not sure why, but after finding out (quite late, at that), that the developer of Terraria was no longer going to release any more updates, I started crying heavily for about 10-15 minutes.



Two things need clearing up here.



I'm not a mega-Terraria fan, it's just one of those 'I play it once and awhile for about a week non-stop and love every second of it then wait for a big update to come out' type of games for me.



And secondly, I cried. Not just, crying, I felt true dysphoria over it, to the point that water streamed from my eyes for multiple minutes of time.



I was, an am, just... sad. I had hoped the game would keep expanding, keep going, keep releasing new iterations... But, this is showing a deeper point of these 'new age' PC games. The procedurally generated worlds that these games sit in, perhaps make us feel like these developers are perpetually going to proceed in generating new worlds and content for us.



How sad to think that Minecraft some day will be nothing but solid code, never being touched by the original creators for anything more than fond memories. How sad to think that Terraria's code is now... solid. It's no longer content fluid, it is a solid game. We paid for it, and it is now... a game that is complete.



Odd that something so basic, can be so cripplingly sad if you've never thought of it before. If you'll excuse me, I need to compose myself before I go and... Sit here for a few more hours.



Editor's Note: Changed the screen up top. Also, oops.



About Speak Up on Kotaku: Our readers have a lot to say, and sometimes what they have to say has nothing to do with the stories we run. That's why we have a forum on Kotaku called Speak Up. That's the place to post anecdotes, photos, game tips and hints, and anything you want to share with Kotaku at large. Every weekday we'll pull one of the best Speak Up posts we can find and highlight it here.
Kotaku

These Are the Best Indie Games of 2011 Just as its sister site ModDB picks the top PC gaming mods of the year, IndieDB rounds out the year with a countdown of the top independently developed games of the year. Think of it as a shopping list to help establish your indie gaming cred. How many of the top ten have you played?



Me? I've only gotten around to experiencing half of the ten games voted by IndieDB community members as the best independent games of the year. I've spent a great many hours exploring the world of Bastion, as everyone should. Stephen got me into SpaceChem after raving about the iPhone version of the game. Trine 2 from Frozenbyte was a no-brainer, considering my great love of the original, and Minecraft-meets-FPS Ace of Spades was personally responsible for several near-oversleep situations over the past few months.



As for the number one game, the 2D building, exploring, and surviving action of Terraria...I'm ashamed to say I hadn't played it at all, at least until this morning, when I plunked down five dollars for a copy on Steam. I'm enjoying it so much right now that this post was nearly incredibly late.



Hit up the list to see not only the top ten, but the top 100 indie games of 2011 and beyond, and start building your shopping list.



IOTY Players Choice - Indie of the Year [IndieDB]


Kotaku

Terraria is a 2D game that has often (and somewhat unfairly) been called "Minecraft in 2D". Not that the four developers care, since they've just sold 200,000 copies in a little over a week.



Spurred on by word-of-mouth, much of it stemming from the game's supposed similarity to Minecraft, the $10 game was first released on May 16. At time of posting, it was the top-selling game on Steam, ahead of games like The Witcher 2 and Portal 2.



What's undoubtedly lured people towards the game is the fact it appears to operate much like Minecraft with a pinch of Castlevania thrown in, in that you explore a world and craft things while fighting monsters.



I'd say it's a bit closer to being a 2D Dwarf Fortress myself. Well, a different kind of 2D than it is normally, anyway.



Link Chevron2D Word-Of-Mouth Hit Terraria Sells 200K In Nine Days [Gamasutra]


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