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Rage Demo Now On Xbox Live; Hits PS3 Dec. 6 Rage, id Software's beloved and detested blending of post-apocalyptic combat racing and first-person shooter, finally has a demo.



"The demo presents a slice of the early game, giving players a chance to explore the town of Wellspring and participate in races, games and other attractions. When you've had your fill there, you can head out to deal with some Ghost Clan raiders. Shooting might be involved."



For those of you who haven't picked up the game yet the demo is available now on Xbox Live and will hit the PS3 on Dec. 6. In the meantime check out my review if you want to read my take on the game. I fell into the first category.



RAGE demo up on Xbox Live; PS3 demo coming December 6 [Bethblog]





You can contact Brian Crecente, the author of this post, at brian@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku





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Here, in this Rage clip, wonky A.I. leads to deadly child's play. Peekaboo? More like peekabang.



Rage was released on Oct. 4. Read Kotaku's review here.



このAIは誰得?『RAGE』に登場する最強のチラチラ戦士 [へちま via Atomic Gamer]





You can contact Brian Ashcraft, the author of this post, at bashcraft@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's WastelandToday's Fine Art features two men who worked on RAGE, id's recently-released desert shooter. One helped design (and build) the game's cars. The other, the game's mutants.



Both somehow found the time to draw pictures of pretty ladies as well. Which, given the amount of tiny shorts on display in this post-apocalyptic wasteland, shouldn't be too big a surprise!



The car stuff is the work of Joey Struve, who also did a whole load of the game's installations, vehicles and weapons as well (which you can see in the gallery above).



The character pieces, meanwhile, are from Ben Olson, who in addition to working on RAGE has done art for games like Area 51: BlackSite and the cancelled This is Vegas.



To see the larger pics in all their glory (or so you can save them as wallpaper), right-click on the "expand" icon on the main image above and select "open in new tab".



Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists. If you're in the business and have some concept, environment or character art you'd like to share, drop us a line!



You can contact Luke Plunkett, the author of this post, at plunkett@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland

The Pretty Ladies, Mutants & Busted Old Cars of RAGE's Wasteland


Kotaku





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Rage's Wasteland is a mean bitch. There are essentials you are going to need to survive, like TV remote controls, dirty mags, and firepower. Who better to explain that than Snoop?



The famed rapper talks through what gets him through the Wasteland, as well as gives a rundown of weapons and gadgets. He also drew a picture of a dog with a rifle on its head—as one does.



Snoop also gives shout-outs to his buddies like Mike Tyson and Jermaine Dupree. Follow ya nose, ya nose knows.





You can contact Brian Ashcraft, the author of this post, at bashcraft@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.





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http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=LaXt2jDa5Xg


Kotaku

PC Gamers, You Should Update Your Graphics Card Drivers This WeekIt's been a big month for PC games, and things are about to get even bigger, so if you've been lazy and forgotten to update your graphics card drivers, you're going to want to fix that.



Between big games having issues (RAGE) and even bigger games just being...big (Battlefield 3), both AMD and Nvidia have released brand new drivers that boast big performance improvements for both those games and other upcoming titles like Batman: Arkham City.



For specifics on what's being improved/fixed, you can see AMD's 11.10v3 notes here, while Nvidia's 285.62 notes can be found here.





You can contact Luke Plunkett, the author of this post, at plunkett@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

UPDATE: Doom 4 "Indefinitely Postponed" Following Rage's Disappointing LaunchA source claiming to be close to the publishers of the recently-launched Rage has told Kotaku that, at a recent "company wide" meeting held in Dallas, Bethesda and parent company Zenimax made the decision to "indefinitely postpone" development of Doom 4.



Pete Hines, responding to our request for comment this morning, says no game in development has been postponed.



"We don't comment on unannounced games and DOOM 4 hasn't been announced (though I appreciate that id has previously referenced DOOM 4)," Hines said. "Games are done when they are done and no title under development at id has been postponed – indefinitely or otherwise."



Despite having been first announced back in 2008, Doom 4 has been on the backburner at developers id while work was completed on multiplatform shooter RAGE, which was released earlier this month to decidedly mixed reviews. While Crecente enjoyed it (and I'm digging it as well), the game's repetitive nature and numerous technical issues left it falling well short of many people's expectations.



The apparent source says that Zenimax and Bethesda made the decision based on the "the issues and reviews" surrounding RAGE's launch, which in their eyes has demonstrated "a serious lack of confidence in the project management at id".



Remember that, before you get too invested in this, at the moment the news is entirely unconfirmed. We've contacted Bethesda for comment and clarification, and will update if we hear back.





You can contact Luke Plunkett, the author of this post, at plunkett@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

Rage Creators Were Unprepared for Tough Questions, Reporter AssertsYou may recall that a couple of weeks ago, Gamasutra's Brandon Sheffield ran an interview with id Software's CEO Todd Hollenshead about Rage. In the interview, Sheffield expressed some doubts about the game, and wasn't convinced by many of Hollenshead's answers. It was a solid piece of journalism, and as our own Stephen Totilo pointed out, it's the kind of interview we could use more of.



Sheffield has penned an op-ed about the interview and the response it prompted. In the piece, he recounts playing the game at a San Francisco event, and how as he played, time and again he found himself flummoxed by the design decisions that id had made. After playing, he sat down to talk with Hollenshead and Rage artist Andy Chang and asked about the issues he noticed.




The oddest thing was how unprepared Hollenshead and Chang were for my questions. How had nobody broached these subjects before? It felt as though the game had been developed in a bubble, where they were told everything they were doing was great, without question. I can understand that, it's id after all. But Hollenshead seemed to genuinely appreciate that I had taken a laser-focus to the game's systems, and the air in the room was contemplative, not hostile. We spoke for an hour, and smiled and shook hands at the end.




After the interview ran, Sheffield describes receiving an anonymous email from only identified as being from a "AAA creative director" that described his line of questioning as "hostile" and "clearly biased," and claims to have instructed PR to refuse future requests form Gamasutra regarding their game. Sheffield doubts the veracity of this email, but all the same, wonders about the language used.




It's out of respect for id that I called them out on what I saw. I gave them an early chance to defend issues with the game that others were undoubtedly going to have upon release. If treating someone else's work the way you'd treat your own - that is to say with scrutiny and criticism - is disrespectful, then we clearly have different definitions of the word.




Opinion: Journalistic Rage [Gamasutra]





You can contact Kirk Hamilton, the author of this post, at kirk@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku





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There appears to be a number of ways to drop yourself beneath the skin of Rage. This one, by hidden rebel elevator, seems the most convenient.





You can contact Brian Crecente, the author of this post, at brian@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

Rage: The Kotaku Review It doesn't really hit me until about half way through the game. I've been spending so much time worrying over the trick of staying alive that I haven't notice just how insignificant I am.



It's not until I'm sent on another armed errand, off to save a general from a federal prison, that I realize that I'm risking my virtual life not to be the hero, but to save the hero.



It's a subtle mindfuck. One that I think some people might not pick up on initially. Who would blame them? Rage is a distracting video game.



***

By far my favorite distractions in Rage are the people of the game's desiccated Earth. The friendly ones, the ones that cluster like tribes in run down gas stations and subways, are a plentiful mix of personalities and attitude. There's the grandmotherly doctor with the steel, two-pronged robotic arm and reading glasses hacked together from bits and pieces of other glasses. The cute girl hanging out in Subway Town who's only purpose seems to be telling me how terrible things are going to get. The mayors, the racers, the shop owners, the survivors.



The unfriendly people, the enemies, are a wild variety of mutant, gearhead, Eastern Bloc militant, high-tech enforcers and hooting, wild-eyed outlanders. These are the guys (I don't think I ever saw a female enemy in the game.) who provide the grist in this mostly-shooter. What separates them isn't just the look of their faction, the flavor of their insanity, but the way they come at you, literally. Early on in the game, you'll come up against people who jump, scramble, roll and swing at you, ping-ponging off the walls and clutter of their dens to attack you. It forces you back, as you try to pick them off along their unpredictable advance. Later the game sends enemies at you who use traps, strategy, flanking tactics, bots and armor to take you out.



These ever-changing enemy types don't just keep you on your toes, they keep the game from feeling old. Ten hours into my 12 hour or so play-through of Rage, I came across a group of enemies that grumbled about how terrible their lot in life was. They seemed the most human of the game's bad guys. When you shoot at them, they turn and run, sometimes tripping over their own feet, scrambling to get back up as they shoot at you or covering their face or body with a waving hand as they seek cover.



And enemies don't all come at you on foot. You'll also have to do a bit of driving getting from the safe zones of those few settlements to the hang-outs of this world's bandits. On the road, in an armed buggy, ATV or car, you can face-off against other drivers, blasting away at them with mini-guns, rockets and pulse canons, or just try to outdrive them to your destination.



The driving is deliberately loose, the physics completely unbelievable, but in a good way.



They turn and run, sometimes tripping over their own feet, scrambling to get back up as they shoot at you or covering their face or body with a waving hand as they seek cover.

Survival in Rage isn't just a matter of skilled aiming and shooting, on foot and in car, it's also about weapon and ammo selection. The first weapon you're handed in the game is the worst, a bulky Settler's Pistol that can hold a variety of ammo, each in cylinders that snap in and out of the gun. While better, more interesting weapons come along as you make your way through the game, assault rifles, machine guns, shotguns, crossbows, sniper rifles and rocket launchers; the game's real shooting innovation comes with those weapons many ammo types.



Most weapons have a variety of bullet types you can load up in a gun. The pistol, for instance has bullets called Fat Mammas that tear through targets as if they're made of paper. It also has an ammo pack that turns the weapon into a machine pistol.



Other weapons have far more interesting ammo types, though. The shotgun can shoot off grenades or EMP charges. The crossbow can shoot electrified bolts that kill and electrocute, taking out groups of clustered enemies if they happen to be standing in water. The mindcontrol bolt turns your target into a staggering, jittering zombie that you can force to walk toward other enemies for a few seconds before they explode.



While you can buy most of this ammo, it's not cheap. There are two ways to deal with the cost of the game's few general stores. You can earn money through side-quests, or by competing on foot or in car. The game's two big towns have racetracks where you can drive in a variety of races to earn a special cash used only for upgrading your vehicles. You can also head over to Mutant Bash TV, a post-apocalyptic television show that pits you against rooms full of mutants for cash prizes. You can also sell off the bits and pieces of clutter you collect on your wanderings through the world. Empty beer bottles, old Doom coffee mugs, radios, bits of scrap metal, can all be picked up and later sold. You can even gamble, trying your hand at the game's many mini and not so mini-games, like finger fillet, Strum, and that amazing collectible trading card game.



But it won't take long for you to realize the best method for getting the high end ammo is to make it yourself. The game's engineering system is pretty straight forward. First you need to purchase or find schematics for the ammo or item you want to build, then you need to find the required bits and pieces to build them. Some items, like quick healing bandages, only require two items to build. Other items, like games AI-controlled, spider-like sentry bot, requires a half-dozen or so items.



Once you have the ingredients, you can engineer anywhere: Just hop into your inventory screen, choose what you want to build and press a button.



Items, like the weapon selection and ammo types, offer another neat twist on just running and gunning. These buildable objects include grenades, decapitating Wingsticks you can whip at enemies, gun turrets, lockgrinders and those nearly sentient sentry bots. The sentry bots, when set loose, drop down at your feet and then scramble around an area looking for enemies to unloose machine gun spray at. Once they clear an area through gun fire, or the occasional pouncing attack, they scramble back to your side to walk through an area with you until they're blown to bits. It's almost like having a sidekick, though they rarely last very long.







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Having someone by your side, even if it's only a dog-like spider bot, helps to give you a bit of companionship in your wanderings across the game's surprisingly broad settings.



The Xbox 360 version of the game comes on three discs. The first two contain the campaign, the third the game's multiplayer. The first disc of the two is the half of the world that includes Wellspring, the second includes the world of Subway Town. Both areas feature one major town, a wide mix of hang-outs and enemy dens and plenty of places to drive around and explore. Rage does an amazing job of delivering an eclectic mix of settings that provide gamers a chance to shoot their way through a variety of crumbling set pieces.



You will fight through collapsing hospitals and malls, shoot it out in an old garage, in bunkers, through a future military fort and an old prison. Most of my favorite backdrops, though, are on that second disc. My favorite of the lot is one of the end-game settings, a place that stretches its route through the teetering tin structures of cliff dwellings. It's one of the only places where you'll feel like you're not pushing your way through nearly always claustrophobic settings.



While id typically does a solid job of obscuring the required invisible walls found in these sorts of games, channeling players down set paths filled with enemies and objectives, they never really make use of their expansive world.



The game's biggest missed opportunity is that while there are massive outdoor settings packed with hostile vehicles and intricately detailed interior levels loaded with scrambling enemies, the two rarely meet.



When you're sent on a mission you nearly always find yourself driving to a door, getting out of your car and then entering a level. I would have loved to experience a more seamless transition from outdoor to indoor, one that allowed me to hop in and out of my vehicle, pick off enemies, approach the objective the way I wanted to.



It's one of the few design decisions I'm unhappy about in Rage, though overall I relished the experience of separately shooting and driving my way through this new id world.



The game also does have some technical issues, problems that may or may not bother you depending both on your willingness to put up with visual imperfections and which platform you're playing the game on.



Played on PC, the launch version of Rage was plagued with issues for some. Many of those problems are fixed or are being fixed, but even fully repaired, the computer version of id's latest title will be, at its best, the equal of the console version.



I was hoping for a game that would push my gaming rig to its full potential, but instead found a game that took some odd shortcuts in arriving on the computer.



The game's defibrillator is a the most obvious example of this. In Rage, when you die you get a second chance: A defibrillator hard-wired into your character kicks in, shocking you back to life and killing or stunning nearby enemies. On console the percentage of health restored and the amount of damage inflicted is determined by how well you match up thumbstick movements on your controller with what's on screen and then the timing of twin trigger pulls. On PC you just have to press a single button at the right time. It's a watered down equivalent, one that could be used as a metaphor for id's approach to the PC version of the game. The graphics and settings all seem like echoes of what you experience on the console.



Initially, I would have put the game's multiplayer in that category too. I was surprised and disappointed after wrapping up the game to be reminded that it doesn't include the sort of multiplayer I like to play most: Deathmatch.



It seemed a weird choice for the people who pioneered the mode, who coined the term, to not include it in their latest game. But after talking with some of the id folk about why they decided to bypass the typical multiplayer modes for a different take on multiplayer, I decided to spend a chunk of the day checking it out.



I found a game that took some odd shortcuts in arriving on the computer.

There are two types of multiplayer in Rage. Wasteland Legends is a batch of cooperative missions apart from Rage's single-player campaign that can be played and replayed locally and with folks online for high scores and leaderboard placement. They're solid, challenging shooter fare that have you working your way through a level with a buddy, shooting up everyone in sight.



Road Rage drops players is the game's only competitive multiplayer and, as the name implies, it takes place completely behind the wheel of a vehicle.



Initially, I wasn't a fan of the game's armed races and chases. But then I started playing around with the game's fourth mode, Carnage. Carnage is essentially deathmatch in cars. Once you get used to the peculiarities of the game's physics and odd assortment of gadgets and weapons, I loved it.



I discovered, while leveling up and unlocking new armor, cars, skins and weapons, that you can drastically alter the course of your airborne vehicle with a turbo boost simply by swiveling your car about in midair and hitting the thrusters. Suddenly, I found myself boosting through in-air bootleg turns, bunny-hopping over approaching enemies, blasting away at dune buggies with in-car nailguns. It's a much more nuanced car combat game then I'm used to, and also a much more rewarding one.



The fact that there's just the one weapons-centric mode may start to tax my interest, but Road Rage is no throw-away addition, it's an engaging, different sort of online experience, exactly what id seemed to be aiming for when they decided to skip traditional deathmatch.



***

What I wasn't as happy with was the game's conclusion. Rage's story isn't bad, it's just light. It feels like the prelude to something much bigger, a table-setter for future games set in a world with a rich fiction and eclectic environments. You are, as I mentioned earlier, not the hero of this game.



That doesn't bother me that much, just like the sometimes rough finish of the game's technical presentation doesn't bother me. Sure there are issues, but there is so much to fall into and examine that the fact that the game isn't constantly stroking my ego isn't a big deal.



In Rage you are a guy, one of many people, buried in the ground in preparation for a world-ending comet strike. When you pop free of the stasis you've been placed in for years, you're not the only one to make it out alive, just the only one who survived in your particular pod.



Early on, the survivors of Rage's world make it clear that you have special powers, but they also almost immediately get busy taking advantage of you and those powers.



It's a vastly different experience than what you'll normally find in a shooter. There are several times in Rage when you show up to play the role of the hero only to discover your just the latest hero, sent in to fix a problem. More than once, I found myself searching through the pockets of the last hero, hoping to find a little extra cash or ammo.



The game's first mission makes it clear you're just the new guy, not "the guy." If you die, things don't end, they just find a new person to send. And that message never wavers. When it finally sinks in that I'm just an armed messenger, it didn't really bother me.



But the developers could have done so much more with that decision. While it frees them from the need to build up a story around you as world saver, it shouldn't preclude any sort of character development. Not being a hero doesn't also mean not having a backstory or motivation to do anything other than be a messenger boy.



The ending, while a perfect fit for the notion of player as useful tool, misses a wonderful opportunity to highlight id's interesting narrative decision. They could have used the ending to shock a player into the realization that they're a nobody in a dying world, ultimately expendable now that things are nicely in motion.



It's not a terrible misstep, just a missed opportunity that could have nicely strengthened the game's final moments.



That said, I loved Rage. It's rare when I set aside a bit of time in my hectic schedule to relish the final moments of a game I've spent a dozen hours playing through.





You can contact Brian Crecente, the author of this post, at brian@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
Kotaku

Why The Deathmatch Kings Left Deathmatch out of Rage They invented the term, so why isn't deathmatch available in Rage?



The notion of players fighting against each other in a first-person shooter is so tied to the genre that it's surprising when it isn't included as a feature. More surprising though, is the idea that the people who may have coined the the term deathmatch would decide to not include it in their first major new shooter in decades.



"Deathmatch" was likely coined by John Romero back when he was helping to build a local area network version of the mode for proto-shooter Doom, or so the story goes.



"Sure, it was fun to shoot monsters, but ultimately these were soulless creatures controlled by a computer," Romero said in an interview for book Masters of Doom. "Now gamers could play against spontaneous human beings-opponents who could think and strategize and scream. We can kill each other!"



While players can join each other to play through a set of cooperative, stand-alone missions, or they can fight each other in a series of online race combat matches, Rage has no classic competitive shooter play. So why did id Software decide to exclude deathmatch from Rage?





What's With the Defibrillator

When you die in Rage the game drops players into a defibrillator mini-game. The better you do at it, the more damage you inflict on nearby enemies and the more health you regain. But the PC and console version are drastically different.

The console version has players manipulating both thumbsticks to match patterns and then pulling both triggers to hit a target. The PC version has players pressing a single button. Willits tells Kotaku that they went through four versions of the defibrillator. "On the PC the defibrillator turned into a series of button smashes that wasn't fun, or was too hard, or way too easy." In the end they decided to go with a timing based system that "allowed for players to quickly get back into the action."





"We have always said we wanted to do something different with Rage," Tim Willits, id Software creative director, told Kotaku. "We didn't want Rage to follow the same pattern of our other titles; we wanted it to be unique amongst our IPs."



In Rage, id Software wanted to create a single-player-centric shooter that was more about the campaign than it was about the multiplayer, Willits said. The multiplayer of Rage, he said, was meant to be an add-on, not a focal point.



id decided to stray from the norm because they wanted to try something different, he said, to take some chances and attempt to design something they've never done before.



"The easy path would have been to create a classic deathmatch game but if no one takes risks anymore the entire industry will begin to get stagnate," Willits said. "I think gamers are quite shrewd these days and appreciate developers trying to explore new game types that aren't done in every other title they release. The response to our multiplayer offering has been quite positive and I'm happy we did something different."



See Also


Why The Deathmatch Kings Left Deathmatch out of Rage



Why Was The PC Launch of Rage Such A "Cluster!@#$"?


The idea from the start was a game that blurred the lines between how games looked on console and PC.

id Software's most famous games, actually all of its major games, were titles built on the computer first, then brought to consoles later.


But not with Rage. More »






Why The Deathmatch Kings Left Deathmatch out of Rage



id Explains How to Tweak the Most Out of PC Rage, More Official Settings Coming Soon


The PC version of Rage will soon have a bevy of new ways for gamers to tweak the way the game behaves and looks on their system, id Software tells Kotaku.

"Rage has fewer tunable settings than games we've released in the past," Robert Duffy, Rage programming director, told Kotaku. More »








You can contact Brian Crecente, the author of this post, at brian@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
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