Kotaku

Now This Is Some Serious Borderlands 2 LootNo, it's not the result of a customizable weapon. It's just 2K community manager Elizabeth Tobey's dachshund, Pancake. Isn't Pancake just adorable?



The real Borderlands 2 collector's edition won't come with a dachshund to sit pretty in your loot chest, but it does come with a bunch of other goodies.



Pancake is famous [dahanese via Reddit]


Kotaku

Borderlands 2 Loot Chest Wants to Get Players Pillaging



The team behind upcoming shooter Borderlands 2 first showed off their fancy loot chest last month at PAX East. The design came from community suggestions, made to look like the in-game loot chests, and they promised it would be filled with as-yet unannounced goodies.



Well, now the goodies are announced. Nestled deeply in among the map, stickers, bobblehead, art book, steel case, lithographs, field notes, creature ID chart, and certificate of authenticity, the "Ultimate Loot Chest Limited Edition" also includes, if you look hard enough, a disc with the game on it. The big bundle goes for $149.99.



Meanwhile, the "Deluxe Vault Hunter's Collector's Edition," at a slightly more affordable $99.99, includes the book, the stickers, the map, the comic, and the bobblehead. Both special editions are available for all platforms (PS3, Xbox 360, and PC) and include additional DLC. All pre-orders of any edition of the game, including the standard version, will receive the DLC Mechromancer character, also detailed at PAX East, for free.



Personally, I am nearly ready to start paying game developers to leave bobbleheads out of their collectors' editions. Those things are just creepy.



Borderlands 2 Pre-Order [Official site]


PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Borderlands 2 collector’s editions announced">Borderlands 2 collector's edition

There are two types of Collector's Edition for Borderlands 2. There's the $99.99 Deluxe Vault Hunter’s Collector's Edition for those who really like Borderlands, and the $149.99 Ultimate Loot Chest Limited Edition set for fans who really, really REALLY like Borderlands.

The cheaper box comes with a Marcus Kincaid bobblehead, a map of pandora, a download code for the digital comic, an art book and some stickers. The ultra-box is modelled in the style of a red Borderlands loot chest (minus the randomised megaguns), and comes with a set of lithograph postcards, some Sir Hammerlock field notes, a "steel book case" and big ID chart that lists all of the creatures you'll encounter in Pandora. Also, most importantly, there's a cloth map. In case you've never held a cloth map, it is the best sort of map a map could hope to be.

Both editions also come with access to the premiere club, which is also available to everyone who pre-rders an ordinary edition of the game. That'll give you access to a series of DLC downloads at launch and beyond, including a Gearbox Gun pack and access to the fifth Mechromancer class when it's eventually added sometime after Borderlands 2's release on September 18. Have a glance at our Borderlands 2 preview for more, or check out the Borderlands 2 site.



Kotaku





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I love animal companions that fight on your side. The mabari you get in Dragon Age is a great example of why; they're adorable, loyal, and not too shabby as fighters.



Borderlands could also benefit from this concept. After all, skags are such a huge part of the universe that you might as well give the player some friendly, trained ones.



In the spirit of Pokémon, one user created this grenade mod that lets you throw Pokéballs that release one of ten skag variants to fight on your side. That's a feature I would definitely love to see in a Borderlands game.



Thanks, Jason!
PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Borderlands 2 “Mechromancer” class planned as post-launch DLC">Borderlands 2 - giant robot

A fifth playable class will be added to Borderlands 2 after release. Early designs cast the new character as a small cyborg girl with the ability to control a small army of mechanical "Deathtrap" robots, which will serve as more killy incarnations of Borderlands' jabbering Claptraps. Gearbox boss Randy Pitchford has told Gametrailers that the "Mechromancer" DLC is currently in the design stages, and will be worked on properly once the core game has been polished off.

Pitchford guesses that the Mechromancer will be added a couple of months after Borderlands 2 comes out, and tells GT that it'll be free to those who pre-order the game to gain access to the Borderlands 2 Premier club. You can check out the pre-order deals on the Borderlands 2 site, though there's still plenty of time to decide whether or not to lay down some early cash. It's not out until September 18 in the US, and September 21 in Europe. Check out our Borderlands 2 preview to find out more about the four new classes we'll be levelling up in the sequel.
Kotaku

Earlier today I attended Gearbox's panel at PAX East, where they revealed a badass new downloadable class in the works for Borderlands 2.



But the existing four classes still needed some flair. Enter the new character customization feature, through which you can create all sorts of wacky costumes and hair colors for your character.



There are also "bazillions" of character skins to choose from, so there's definitely a healthy amount of fun to be had with building your new treasure hunter/mercenary.


Kotaku

In a panel at PAX East, Gearbox Software just revealed that Borderlands 2 will add a new class—the "Mechromancer" sometime after the game releases this October. The class is in the conceptual stages only and will be developed once the game goes into its certification stages later this year. Concept art for the character was shown during a Gearbox Software panel at PAX.



To clarify confusion regarding our original wording, while preorders will receive the Mechromancer for free, the content will release to all players at the same time. That date is not set but a Gearbox representative said it would be 60 to 90 days after the game releases.



Furthermore, those who did play the first game (and still have their gamesave, of course) will be given a custom character skin and a unique head as a thank-you, Gearbox said at the same panel.



Some of the game's special edition premiums—which the studio had put up to a suggestion box last year—also were revealed. There will be two tiers of special editions. The "Deluxe Vault Hunters Edition" at $99, gets a Marcus Kincaid bobble head. He's the weapons supplier with the lothario accent who narrates the first game. The second, an "Ultimate Loot Chest Edition" (pictured above) delivers you a stylized Borderlands loot chest with all the goodies packed inside. It doesn't open up with hydraulics—it's more like a jewelry box, but it matches a community suggestion as best it could. More goodies and premiums in both editions will be announced later.



Borderlands 2 Will Get a New Character Class—Don't Worry, She's Not a Preorder Exclusive [Updated]Finally, the Gearbox gang tossed out Easter eggs with codes inside, redeemable at a special website, that allowed attendees to compete to potentially insert their names into Borderlands 2 or Aliens: Colonial Marines as an Easter egg.


Kotaku

Too Much Time and Money Can Make a Video Game Bad, Gearbox SaysWhat would games look like if the developers behind them had an unlimited amount of time to work on them?



I'm not talking about an unlimited time in development hell, like Duke Nukem Forever. I'm talking about the luxury of not having a publisher breathing down your neck to crank a game out by the contracted time.



So what would Borderlands 2 look like if the Gearbox team had no time limitations? Would it look different than what they anticipate it currently will?



"No. It would look the same," says Sean Reardon, senior producer at Gearbox Software. But why?



"I don't buy into unlimited time. As a producer, I think the thing that creates quality is the focus on time. If you have unlimited time, you're going to have no constraints. The boundaries are too ill-defined for me to do anything creative in that space. I need something concrete to be creative. If we had infinite time, we'd still be dicking around on that very first decision. There'd be no game."



What about infinite money? Surely you could use infinite money for glamorous cinematics, high-end voice actors, motion capture, promotional campaigns, anything?



Nope, not that either. "If I have infinite money, where's my passion? If I have no creative boundaries, I have nothing to do. I have no challenge. I'm not saying, ‘Work for money,' I'm saying, ‘Use money to solve interesting challenges.'"





Too Much Time and Money Can Make a Video Game Bad, Gearbox Says



There's A New Siren In Borderlands 2, And She Kicks Fierce Robot Ass


What do you do with a sequel to a game that has a huge roster of weapons, quirky characters, and awesome 4-player co-op? You add more weapons, of course. More »






Too Much Time and Money Can Make a Video Game Bad, Gearbox Says



How The Worst Thing Players Did in Borderlands Made It Better


Gearbox Software's first Borderlands won fans over with its awesome, awesome loot, high-contrast art style and wacky characters. But, as great as the game's procedurally-generated weapons were, Gearbox say that the first-person shooter/role-playing hybrid was whatever the gamer wanted it to... More »






Too Much Time and Money Can Make a Video Game Bad, Gearbox Says



Day One DLC Isn't Always Evil, Says Borderlands 2 Guy


Everyone hates day one DLC. But even haters of the practice don't really understand why it exists.

The exact procedure that goes into launching a game means that developers aren't always on-hand with a game up until to the day it is launched. More »





Kotaku

Day-One DLC Isn’t Always Evil, Says Borderlands 2 GuyEveryone hates day-one DLC. But even haters of the practice don't really understand why it exists.



The exact procedure that goes into launching a game means that developers aren't always on-hand with a game up until to the day it is launched. Teams are left free to work on bugs, patches, or extra content after the game has entered its alpha stage.



Gearbox senior producer Sean Reardon finds it unfortunate that the wider community of gamers does not understand this procedure, but to him it's also understandable. He loves working on DLC, and in fact was the producer for the DLC on the first Borderlands title. DLC, he says, is not always evil.



"I can imagine a situation where the game is in certification for 5 weeks before it comes out. It's actually off our hands. Day one feels different to me than on-disc. On-disc means that at the time of going into certification I've done extra work and decided, you know what? I'm not going to give you that. I'm going to cordon that off and ask you for more money later on. There's a line there.



I'm going to go home and I'm not going to get my $60 worth. Then they're going to charge me more to unlock the thing I should've gotten the first time. That's horseshit. That's actually horseshit. And I firmly believe that."



It's safe to say you won't be seeing any on-disc DLC with Borderlands 2. Reardon says he is going to push his team to put every ounce of effort into creating a complete game for launch, and then push them even further for any potential content thereafter. "The only work that had happened before shipping Borderlands 1 was to enable the fact that we could even have DLC. There's actually a lot of work to make that possible to not exclude that option."



The first title's DLC gave players new settings, creatures, vehicles, and gameplay modes that convinced gamers to revisit their gameshelves for Borderlands 1. For those of you who were as addicted to the game as I was, the downloadable content was both a welcomed addition as well as the perfect excuse to keep playing. Any potential Borderlands 2 DLC will hopefully inspire the same amount of creativity from the development team.





Day-One DLC Isn’t Always Evil, Says Borderlands 2 Guy



There's A New Siren In Borderlands 2, And She Kicks Fierce Robot Ass


What do you do with a sequel to a game that has a huge roster of weapons, quirky characters, and awesome 4-player co-op? You add more weapons, of course. More »






Day-One DLC Isn’t Always Evil, Says Borderlands 2 Guy



How The Worst Thing Players Did in Borderlands Made It Better


Gearbox Software's first Borderlands won fans over with its awesome, awesome loot, high-contrast art style and wacky characters. But, as great as the game's procedurally-generated weapons were, Gearbox say that the first-person shooter/role-playing hybrid was whatever the gamer wanted it to... More »





Kotaku

The Worst Thing Players Did in Borderlands Made It BetterGearbox Software's first Borderlands won fans over with its awesome, awesome loot, high-contrast art style and wacky characters. But, as great as the game's procedurally-generated weapons were, Gearbox say that the first-person shooter/role-playing hybrid was whatever the gamer wanted it to be.



During Gearbox Software's trip to NY for a Borderlands 2 preview, I asked senior producer Sean Reardon if he wished certain merits of Borderlands were more emphasized in the eyes of their community of gamers. He told me that the games the team makes are for the consumers, and it effectively becomes their game.



"We make that as a joke. We'll say, ‘You're a bad designer if you tell your customer that you're playing the game wrong.' It's actually the customer's game. We should do our best to enable that experience. If someone is playing the game and they're not having a good time and it's because they're not playing it right, that's our fault."



Borderlands 1's history shows that Gearbox has practiced what they preach here. I brought up the rampant duping and modding of weapons in Borderlands 1 where gamers would have access to things like rocket launchers with unlimited ammo and perfect targeting.



"People duping weapons was eye-opening and made us feel embarrassed."

This was a perfect example, Reardon noted. "People duping weapons was eye-opening and made us feel embarrassed," he responded. And although Gearbox released a patch embedded in the third DLC, The Secret Armory of General Knoxx, that wiped most of the duped and illegitimate weapons, they decided to keep one of the buggier creations. It came to be known as "Pearlescent" for its off-white tone. The glitch-based anomaly wasn't a very good gun but it wound up being incredibly cherished for its rarity. And even though it broke the game, the development team decided to embrace the community's positive response towards it. Because in their view, "So long as the player is laughing, it's a feature. If he's crying, it's not."



Fortunately, a game as wacky and creative as Borderlands lends itself quite well to new, community-inspired additions like this one. Reardon looks pleased when he tells me that "we can do basically anything we want if it feels fun." Gearbox feels obligated to deliver on the kind of content their gamers want, and that their gamers find fun even if it wasn't something that the team had come up with. And adding the Pearlescent gun class was fun.



It's unclear if Borderlands 2 will have similar exploits that let weapons like Pearlescent happen, but here's hoping that players will find more unintended options for making the sequel uniquely exciting.


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