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Sid Meier's Civilization V: Gold Edition

Show posts for all products, not just Sid Meier's Civilization V: Gold Edition
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to How Sid Meier became one of the most recognizable names in gaming">sid meier







Sid Meier is second only, perhaps, to Tom Clancy in the ranking of “guys with their names at the front of game titles.” Unlike Clancy, though, Meier actually had a hand in developing legendary games like Sid Meier’s Civilization, Sid Meier’s Alpha Centauri, Sid Meier’s Pirates!, and the original X-COM.



Meier hasn’t always courted the press, but over at Kotaku there’s a lengthy feature interview relating Meier’s recollection of pivotal moments in gaming history. For example, there’s the somewhat-disputed origin of the “Sid Meier’s” moniker that made its way to so many of our favorite games:



“We were at dinner at a Software Publishers Association meeting, and Robin Williams was there,” longtime collaborator Bill Stealey says. “And he kept us in stitches for two hours. And he turns to me and says ‘Bill, you should put Sid's name on a couple of these boxes, and promote him as the star.’ And that's how Sid's name got on Pirates, and Civilization.”



The interview also explores a lot of Meier’s personality, including some aspects that I had never known before. Meier is a devout Christian who plays music for his church. Though his games are frequently about violent times and places, there is never any blood or gore shown. He designs and creates his games by playing them, over and over, until they are fun.



For a ton of great anecdotes about the games and studios that defined Meier’s career and, in turn, defined an industry and a generation of gamers, check out the full profile.



Image from Firaxis.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Civilization V: Brave New World’s launch trailer shows up early, and we’re OK with that">Civilization V: Brave New World







Sid Meier's Civilization V’s newest expansion, Brave New World, doesn’t hit PC until July 9. But the drive of the human spirit to create great things is so indomitable, so profound, that the producers of the launch trailer refused to wait and instead released it today. For freedom! For progress!



Or maybe they put it out 11 days early because it’s got Keith David narrating, and that alone should pour some gas on the publicity fire.







We’ve had a lot of fun with Civ V and its various expansions, and we’ve been looking forward to diving into this one. It adds nine new civilizations including Morroco, Brazil, Venice, and Indonesia. The new civilizations and their leaders can strive toward eight new Wonders, including Broadway, the Globe Theatre, and the International Space Station.



Players can also look forward to conquering the world monetarily through new trade routes or bringing nations to order through the World Congress.



Brave New World hits on July 9 in the US and July 12 everywhere else. You can snag it for $30/£20.
Shacknews - Steve Watts

Civilization 5's fast-coming Brave New World expansion focuses heavily on the late-game, according to the creators. A new launch trailer highlights that by showcasing several of the world's more recent events, like the advent of movies, tanks, airplanes, and rocket ships.

In fact, it gives such a rousing summary of our greatest accomplishments over the last century or so that it's easy to momentarily forget it's advertising a game expansion pack. That's just the kind of opportunity you have when your game is all about human achievement. Check it out below.

PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Civilization V: Brave New World’s final two civs and how to play them">Venice Featured







Last month, we walked you through seven of the nine new civs coming in Civilization V: Brave New World. The final two, Venice and the Shoshone, were at our fingertips, but not yet revealed. With the official announcement out of the bag, we can finally talk about them, and give you our impressions and suggested strategies. They've been sitting in a notepad file on my desktop for a while, but if you cut the moldy parts off, they should taste fine.







Venice



Unique Ability: Serenissima

You can never build or capture settlers. You can never annex conquered cities.



Wait, what? That doesn't sound like a power.



Well, internal monologue, you get some benefits to balance this out. For instance, double the number of possible trade routes. You get a free Merchant of Venice (see below) when you research Optics. And in cities you've puppeted (which you can do, you just can't annex them), you're allowed to purchase buildings and units with gold as if you'd annexed the city. You just can't choose what they produce on their own time. Phew.



Unique Great Person: Merchant of Venice

In addition to all the things a Great Merchant (which they replace) can do, they can actually buy off a city-state with the click of a button, turning it into a puppeted city.



Unique Unit: Great Galleas

Were you expecting something crazy? You know, since all of Venice's other stuff is? Well, unfortunately, this is just a bigger, stronger Galleas. Next to everything else, I'd say it's a Pretty Good Galleas, at best.



Adviser T.J. says:

What the what? Okay, I freaking love Venice. They turn Civ V into a totally different game, which is something all expansions should aim to do. Removing settlers as a mechanic has huge implications, and it makes your capital the de facto and permanent lynchpin of your empire. Placement is going to be at least twice as important as it is normally, so don't be afraid to wander for a couple turns before setting down good ol' Venezia. Tradition, obviously, is a must. You'll also want to invest in Exploration, if for no other reason than to have a stronger navy for defending your eight bazillion trade routes. Victory-wise, Diplomatic seems like the way to go. Ally yourself to as many city-states as possible, and buy out the ones that ally with your political rivals. There's actually nothing they can do about it. Because you're Venice. And you're amazing.







The Shoshone



Unique Ability: Great Expanse

Newly-founded cities start with more territory, and units gain a bonus when fighting on Shoshone land.



Unique Unit: Pathfinder

Replacing the Scout, the Pathfinder is almost as powerful as a Warrior in combat, and they can choose which benefit they get from exploring Ancient Ruins (instead of getting a random one).



Unique Unit: Comanche Raiders

A cheaper, faster alternative to Cavalry.



Adviser T.J. says:

Venice is a pretty tough act to follow, but the Shoshone have some pretty cool opportunities. Larger starting city borders also means you can get more map vision faster, which works perfectly with Pathfinders. You'll want to claim as many ruins as possible, so I'd ignore warriors altogether in the early game (Pathfinders can hold their own almost as well) and spend a handful turns just cranking out Pathfinders. When you claim a ruin, take the Technology bonus whenever possible, and plan for a science victory. I also highly recommend grabbing the religious tenet that gives you bonus Faith for whatever type of land tile is most common near your start location. Since you'll have so much land so early, you should be able to dominate the religious game.
Shacknews - Steve Watts

Civilization 5's next expansion, Brave New World, is introducing a host of new mechanics and cultures. But just what goes into picking which cultures make the proverbial cut?

A lengthy piece on Polygon details the process. For starters, the team is handed a number of new civilizations by the production team, which determines it by how much bandwidth it has to create new art. It chose nine for Brave New World, in part to match the number from the last expansion, Gods and Kings.

Then it came down to determining which countries would make up those nine. Part of it came from noting what's underrepresented. It looked at the community to determine these, and came up with Indonesia, Brazil, Zulu, and Morocco. Three of those four are from South America and Africa, which Firaxis had already decided needed more representation.

After that, choosing the other five came down to deciding which countries fit with its design goals, or what could add new twists. Portugal and Venice were natural fits for the new trading system, and Poland's social policies worked well with the revised policy system. Assyria was a unique mix of science and expansionism, while the Shoshone allowed a more peaceful game based on a defensive bonus.

Check out the full piece for more details. Brave New World is due out on July 9.

Shacknews - John Keefer

Sid Meier's name is well known in gaming circles for the addicting "just one more turn" mentality associated with his strategy games. Of course, there is never any mistaking what his games are because his name is usually in the game's title.

It can't be because of ego, as colleagues say Meier is a very soft-spoken, unassuming man. "In the [13] years and all the people I've worked with at Firaxis," said designer Jake Solomon, "there has never been anyone who's had a personality issue with Sid, 'cause it's not possible. He's such a wonderful person."

So just how did it happen that the brilliant strategy designer's games get that title treatment? It started in Meier's days at MicroProse with partner Bill Stealey, as Meier was pitching the idea for a pirate game.

"Bill said, 'When's my next flight simulator coming out?' And I said, 'I'm not doing a flight simulator; I'm doing a pirates game,'" Meier told Kotaku. "He said, 'Well that's crazy, 'cause people want your next flight simulator ... Wait a minute. Put your name on it. Maybe if they liked your flight simulator games, they'll recognize the name and buy this crazy pirates thing.'"

However, Stealey remembered things a bit differently: "We were at dinner at a Software Publishers Association meeting, and [actor] Robin Williams was there. And he kept us in stitches for two hours. And he turns to me and says 'Bill, you should put Sid's name on a couple of these boxes, and promote him as the star.' And that's how Sid's name got on Pirates, and Civilization."

Sid Meier's Pirates! came out in 1987, and since that time, his name has appeared on two railroad games, five Civilization games (plus expansions and a console version), two Civil War games, one space game, a colonization game, and even a golf game. Ironically, Meier and Stealey originally teamed up to make flight sims, but the first airplane game to bear his name was the recently released iOS title Sid Meier's Ace Patrol.

Shacknews - Alice O'Connor

While we were distracted gushing over horseback stealth and hair dragons last week during E3, 2K Games quietly released another Civilization V: Gods & Kings trailer. Now that we've had time to see it, hey, it's a short but interesting look at one of the expansion's big new features: the World Congress and its new diplomatic win.

The World Congress is a United Nations analogue where every civilization gets together to vote on resolutions. These include hosting the International Games, enacting trade embargoes, banning particular luxury resources, taxing armies, and stopping the construction of nuclear weapons. They can also build things like the International Space Station together.

At a certain point, seemingly once the Information Era is reached, every civilization will vote for a leader of the world at the World Congress. If any one civ wins, they win the game. Huzzah!

Do check out the trailers focusing on Gods & Kings' culture and tourism, trade routes, and policies and ideologies too, if you haven't already. The expansion launches for PC on July 9.

Shacknews - Alice O'Connor

While we were distracted gushing over horseback stealth and hair dragons last week during E3, 2K Games quietly released another Civilization V: Brave New World trailer. Now that we've had time to see it, hey, it's a short but interesting look at one of the expansion's big new features: the World Congress and its new diplomatic win.

The World Congress is a United Nations analogue where every civilization gets together to vote on resolutions. These include hosting the International Games, enacting trade embargoes, banning particular luxury resources, taxing armies, and stopping the construction of nuclear weapons. They can also build things like the International Space Station together.

At a certain point, seemingly once the Information Era is reached, every civilization will vote for a leader of the world at the World Congress. If any one civ wins, they win the game. Huzzah!

Do check out the trailers focused on Brave New World's culture and tourism, trade routes, and policies and ideologies too, if you haven't already. The expansion launches for PC on July 9.

PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Civilization 5: Brave New World trailer pursues diplomatic relations">Civ 5 DIPLOMACY ALL UP INS







CAUTION: After all the whizz-bang pyrotechnics, gushing blood, heavy rock, and urgent shouting from a week long bombardment of E3 trailers, this sedate Civ 5: Brave New World featurette could be a dramatic shock to the system. Don't just play it, ease into it. Maybe make a cup of tea. If you're not British, why not give it a go anyway? They're really rather good.



Ready? Okay, now you can learn about the expansion's diplomacy overhaul, and the newly arriving World Congress.







This is the last of Firaxis' video round up for the expansion. If you missed any, they were: culture, ideologies, and trade.



Brave New World releases July 12th Internationally, and July 9th in the US.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to The best Civilization V mods">CivilizationV 2013-06-06 17-09-27-06







Now that Civilization V has had a few years to mature, it's gone from Civ IV's scrawnier younger sibling to a full-grown adult (it's even shaving now, we hear). Firaxis' official patches and expansions—Gods & Kings, and now the upcoming Brave New World—have done a lot to help fill-out Civ V's feature set, but the amazing modding community has also been twisting knobs and adding content, with over 1500 mods available on Steam Workshop.



This list features most of our favorites of the bunch, but we've opted to leave out single civs and single maps (of which there are many) to focus on interface, graphics, and larger gameplay and campaign mods. For a quick glance at all our recommendations, check our Steam Workshop collection, and you're encouraged to recommend your favorites in the comments.

Utilities and Interface Tweaks

 





Civ V Unofficial Patch

Start here. The Unofficial Patch is a collection of upgrades which add detail to the interface such as promotion icons over units, city banners which show turns until border expansion, and an improved city view. Those and many more tweaks make it easier to see data at a glance, and there are also tools for modders, if you're looking to make this list's next addition.



You'll need the Gods & Kings version of the Unofficial Patch if you want to enjoy the G&K Enhanced Mod mentioned later (and I recommend you do). If you don't own the Gods & Kings expansion, grab Vanilla Enhanced, which includes the original Unofficial Patch.





Really Advanced Setup

Since we're all Really Advanced Players here, we can use Really Advanced Setup to do really advanced things. Really Advanced Setup lets you deactivate civs we don't want randomly chosen, decide if you want to start near the ocean, a river, or in a certain biome (grass, plains, hills, forest, etc.), set starting bonuses, change starting units, and more.



As I already obsess over designing the perfect starting scenario, this mod is dangerous—try not to spend more time tweaking resource distribution than playing.





PerfectWorld3

Using Perlin noise, PerfectWorld 3 builds an elevation map to create landforms, then uses "a simplified model of geostrophic and monsoon wind patterns" to generate climate—the results as I've observed them are notably more natural maps. The version on Steam Workshop was not uploaded by the creator, but works, and the original thread can be found at Civilization Fanatics.





City Limits

With a city or Settler selected, City Limits displays the maximum area city borders can expand into. With a Settler selected, it also shows the overlap your potential new city will have with adjacent settlements, which is useful for optimizing placement. Make this simple but very helpful mod yours on Steam Workshop.





Faster Aircraft Animations

Don't start an industrial revolution without it! Get it on Steam Workshop.





InfoAddict

If you graphed the crossover between people who like Civ V and people who like graphs, you'd be wasting your time—everyone likes graphs. Get lots of them with InfoAddict, which comes in Gods & Kings and vanilla flavors and charts the world's progress, international relationships, and demographics with unmatched detail.





Graphics Mods

 





R.E.D. Modpack

R.E.D. started back with Civ IV, and stands for Regiment and Ethnic Diversity. It adds visual variation to the units and adjusts their proportions so that tanks are no longer accosted by giant infantrymen and aircraft carriers aren't eclipsed by Renaissance Era ships. R.E.D. also changes up the formations so the units look less like they were copied and pasted into their tiles.



Get it on Steam Workshop.





R.E.D. Xtreme

Install the original R.E.D. Modpack first, then R.E.D. Xtreme to shrink and multiply your units' individual actors even more. People smaller than hills? What crazy ideas will the modding community come up with next? Civs which don't all issue identical uniforms?





Ethnic Units

With some reference help from the R.E.D. Modpack, Ethnic Units also diversifies the look of each civ's infantry and vehicles with reskins. It may not be wholly complete (I'm afraid I haven't spawned one of every available unit from every civ for scrutiny), but it makes an easily identifiable difference and is being updated continuously—as of this article's posting, the last change was made yesterday.





Gameplay and Total Conversion Mods

 





G&K Enhanced Mod

Along with the Unofficial Patch (which is required to use it), the Gods & Kings Enhanced Mod touches every mechanic in Civ V. The AI is more rational, barbarians are much tougher, and just about everything has been rebalanced.



One of my favorite, smaller features is its Oregon Trail-like decision prompts, such as "frequent seasonal floods of this river provide unusually fertile topsoil for farming," with options to pay for new irrigation canals, research better ways to protect homes from floods, or let the locals handle it. Really, all you're doing is spending gold to earn a little extra Science, city-state loyalty, or what-have-you, but the prompts add flavor to the story of a city and civilization.



Get it on Steam Workshop—if you don't have Gods & Kings, grab the vanilla version instead. It should be noted that quite a few commenters have reported significant bugs—I haven't been able to replicate them yet, but if you need to troubleshoot, there's a forum for that.





R.E.D. WWII Edition

Unlike the R.E.D. Modpack on the previous page, which just adjusts the looks of units, R.E.D. WWII is a total conversion World War II scenario pack. More than just some maps that look a bit like Europe, it adds features such as capturing and liberating tiles, supply lines, reinforcements, and hotseat play.



This collection on Steam Workshop includes the two mods required, R.E.D. WWII Data Files and R.E.D. WWII Edition, as well as a couple recommended mods, including a version of R.E.D. Xtreme which works with the conversion to scale down the units. Note that most of your other mods will not likely be compatible with R.E.D. WWII.





Prehistoric Era

If ancient history just isn't ancient enough for you, try cultivating a great civilization starting 2000 years prior to the invention of writing. Prehistoric Era kicks things off with cavemen and rock paintings, adding 10 technologies, five buildings, and four new units. City growth and research are a bit more sluggish until you reach the Classical Era, so you're in for quite an epic if you plan to play from the Prehistoric Era all the way to Giant Death Robots.





Civilization Nights

Civilization Nights deserves recognition just for being as massive as it is—it may be the most comprehensive overhaul of Civ V there is. The total conversion makes significant rules changes (Happiness is most notably revamped) and advertises over 50 new buildings and wonders with custom artwork, dozens of new units with their own models, new policies, a restructured tech tree, and as many tweaks as there are stars in the night sky. Well, not that many, but a lot—the details can be found in its Civilization Fanatics thread.



Unfortunately, Nights hasn't been updated since October of last year, but if you can get past any bugs or unfinished bits you may encounter, it's a unique way to experience Civ V.





A Mod of Ice and Fire

If George R.R. Martin killed your favorite character in A Song of Ice and Fire or HBO's Game of Thrones series—and, spoiler, he probably does—you can design your own hexagonal fate for the fantasy series' warring families. A Mod of Ice and Fire is the best GoT mod I know of—all 10 new leaders have unique traits and special units and buildings, the religions, Great People, and spies have been renamed, and the technology tree appropriately ends in the Renaissance Era. It also comes with a Westeros and Essos map, a just-plain Westeros map, and a map of The Known World.



Grab A Mod of Ice and Fire on Steam Workshop (requires Gods & Kings).





Yet (not) Another Earth Maps Pack

You've got to have a good earth! There are tons to choose from, but I like Yet (not) Another Earth Maps Pack for the variety it offers in one package. There are several maps here—including Europe and Mediterranean maps as well as the whole of earth—and some added setup features.



With the mod loaded, select "custom game" to get to its custom start screen, where you can select a version of earth, and adjust city-state placement and resource distribution.





Strange and Historical Religions

The names and icons of religions are just for flavor, but its still a treat to found the Brotherhood of Nod, Church of Star Trek, Pastafarianism, or any of the other fictional and real religions and philosophies included in the Strange Religions pack. Objectivism vs. Scientology, fight! Actually, please don't.



If you prefer more historically significant faiths, the Historical Religions mod will give you fun, hard to spell religions such as Tlateomatiliztli, Pesedjet, and Forn Siðr, complete with custom icons and their own Civlopedia entries. If you need even more ideological fidelity, grab the Historical Religions Schisms Addon too and divide Christianity into Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, and Protestantism.
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