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BioShock Infinite

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PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Hear three BioShock Infinite: Burial At Sea original songs from Irrational Games">Bioshock-Infinite-Burial-at-Sea-1-610x347





BioShock Infinite had some great original songs and arrangements. You can buy the original game s soundtrack, but there s some new music in the recently released Burial at Sea DLC that you couldn't easily listen to, until recently. Irrational Games posted three full, original songs from Burial at Sea to its official website, along with some commentary from the game s Music Director, Jim Bonney.

Bonney describes the first song, Little Sisters Song, as an idealistic musical conversation between Mama Tenenbaum and the little sisters. I was thinking about ways to create depth in daily life in Rapture, and thought that the Little Sisters Home could use a little propaganda music, he said. A song that would ease the minds of the citizens that little girls being taken from their families was really just another example of living the Objectivist s Dream!





The Pie Song, which is in the style of a 50s folk protest song, was produced by Marc Lacuesta and performed by Korby Lenker.



And the final song is Old Man Winter Jingle, which promotes the Old Man Winter Plasmid. The announcer you hear in the end is actually Irrational Games Senior Sound Designer Jeff Seamster.





For more behind the scenes stories on original music in Bioshock Infinite, check out Irrational Games official blog.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to 4K Screenshot Showcase: Bioshock Infinite">Bioshock infinite 4k header







Every Monday, keen screen-grabber Ben Griffin brings you a sumptuous 4K resolution gallery to celebrate PC gaming's prettiest places.



Few would deny that Bioshock Infinite's floating city of Columbia is a gorgeous place to shoot spliced-up weirdos. The first sight of Columbia's main square is impossible to forget. It's a blaze of glorious colour, enriched with hundreds of incidental details, all contributing a little to the story behind Infinite's hovering dystopia. There are many more moments to match it, so we've captured a few here in glorious 4k resolution to celebrate Infinite's terrific art design. Enjoy.







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PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Bioshock Infinite: Burial at Sea episode two review">Episode 2 Intro







A lot happens in the opening moments of Burial at Sea: Episode 2. You'll meander through a Disneyfied version of Paris, one that's a garlic garland short of full stereotype; be threatened by Atlas back in the post-Episode 1 version of Rapture; and discuss pseudo-quantum science with an incorporeal Booker. As a concentrated dollop of Bioshock lore, it's alienating but also strangely liberating. Halfway through Infinite, we started to jump the infini-sharks, now the game is willing its players to give in and enjoy the view.



This time, you're playing as Elizabeth. Only, for reasons directly tied to the opening whirlwind of plot, it's an Elizabeth that's no longer omniscient, or able to open tears. What she can do is bonk splicers on the back of the head with a Sky-Hook a trick that comes in useful as you work through more remnants of Fontaine's department store/sunken prison.



Significantly more fragile than Booker, Elizabeth has no shield and a limited set of weapons. Stealth is the focus for the first time in the series, and the new weapons and plasmids have been designed for that purpose. The most useful of these is Peeping Tom, which doubles up as both X-ray vision and invisibility, but you'll also find tranquiliser darts and a selection of lethal weapons that provide options when sneaking fails.







As a set of systems, the stealth is simplified and exaggerated, but nonetheless entertaining to play with. The near-sighted splicers suggest that Ryan's objectivism failed to attract any opticians, so vision is less a factor in discovery than noise. As Elizabeth crouch-walks through the levels, she won't raise any alarms on regular surfaces, but shattered glass and water puddles produce an almost comedic cacophony that alerts anyone in the vicinity.



Although it's not the most elegant introduction of stealth, it works because of the pacing and smooth escalation of difficulty. Episode 2 is much slower than Episode 1's frantic resource scavenging, and that more deliberate pace gels well with the series' emphasis on fully exploring its environments. More than that, though, with the focus no longer on all-out combat, I found those moments when I was forced to go loud pulling out the shotgun to blast my way out of danger a refreshing change, rather than an increasingly stale necessity.



It turns out that deranged magical junkies aren't the smartest of pursuers, so escape from their immediate vision and they'll quickly lose track of your location. In the more open areas this can be as simple as leaping towards a ceiling hook, at which point you can land in a crouch behind the nearest splicer to deliver an unseen melee attack from behind. Here, it feels like an incredibly basic version of Arkham's gargoyle sections, but the satisfying and speedy swooping across rooms still nicely punctuates the periods of caution.







With no Booker to aid, Elizabeth no longer spends her time tossing ammo and coins. There are still locks to be picked though, and that means a mini-game. As with the other new systems, it's a pretty basic interaction. The pick automatically moves back and forth a series of tumblers, requiring you to make a selection. These can't be failed, but certain tumblers are colour-coded. Hit a red one, and an alarm goes off, drawing any nearby splicers. Pick a blue one, and you're given a noisemaker dart useful for distracting groups of enemies, or the unkillable Big Daddy that roams an early hub area.



Thorough exploration rewards with plasmid upgrades that drastically improve your abilities. Maxing out the Peeping Tom, I was able to turn invisible at no cost to Eve as long as I remained immobile. In some respects it feels overpowered, to the point that I rarely felt threatened across the just-under-four hours of my normal difficulty playthrough. In the new 1998 mode, which only allows for non-lethal takedowns, being able to easily slip away feels like a more integral ability.



As a whole, Episode 2 feels like the most cohesive Bioshock Infinite campaign. It's certainly more so than Episode 1, which had a hard divide separating its combat and story. But even the main game's action-oriented combat was often at odds with its attempts to present a living world. Here, Elizabeth is always in danger, and always the outsider creeping unseen through a world she isn't part of. In this, the character and combat are completely in sync.







It also helps that Elizabeth is perhaps the most likeable protagonist of the series. As haunted and flawed as any other Bioshock lead, she carries that burden with a sorrow that makes her all the more sympathetic. Over the years, the Bioshocks have utilised elements of horror, mystery, science-fiction and detective noir. In Episode 2, at a character level, it also makes for an effective tragedy.



It's let down by an overarching plot that feels inconsequential, despite this episode being significantly more substantial than the first. At times it tips into self-indulgence specifically with a ham-fisted retconning of the Vox Populi's most controversial story beat. Throughout, this final expansion plays around in plot holes that never needed filling, which makes for an unsatisfying resolution.



As Irrational's final work, Episode 2 is a fitting epitaph; both in its ability to offer a fresh perspective on the series, and in the way it obsesses over past triumphs.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Papers, Please and Gone Home take BAFTA Awards, Houser brothers make rare appearance for Rockstar’s Fellowship">BAFTA







I'm not going to sugar-coat this for you: last night's BAFTA Game Awards didn't end with the PC hunched under an unbearable weight of face gold. The platform struggled against heavy hitting console match-three games, like The Last of Us, and Grand Theft Auto 5. Even so, there were awards for indie gems Papers, Please and Gone Home, and multi-platform titles like Bioshock Infinite. In addition, the reclusive Rockstar heads showed up in person to accept their BAFTA fellowship. You can find that video, and a full list of winners, below.



Also, before the big list, be sure to check out the BAFTA Steam sale that's running until later today. There are some particularly great deals in there, like the excellent XCOM: Enemy Within for a ridiculously low 5/$7.50.



BAFTA FELLOWSHIP

- Winner: Rockstar Games







BEST GAME

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Papers, Please

- Super Mario 3D World

- Tearaway



ACTION AND ADVENTURE

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- BADLAND

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

- Tomb Raider



STRATEGY AND SIMULATION

- Winner: Papers, Please

- Civilization 5: Brave New World

- Democracy 3

- Forza Motorsport 5

- Surgeon Simulator 2013

- XCOM: Enemy Within



MULTIPLAYER

- Winner: Grand Theft Auto 5

- Battlefield 4

- Dota 2

- Super Mario 3D World

- The Last of Us

- World of Tanks



SPORTS

- Winner: Fifa 14

- F1 2013

- Football Manager 2014

- Forza Motorsport 5

- Grid 2

- NBA 2K14



FAMILY

- Winner: Tearaway

- Animal Crossing: New Leaf

- Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

- Rayman Legends

- Skylanders SWAP Force

- Super Mario 3D World



STORY

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

- Gone Home

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

- The Stanley Parable



GAME DESIGN

- Winner: Grand Theft Auto 5

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- Papers, Please

- Tearaway

- The Last of Us

- Tomb Raider



DEBUT GAME

- Gone Home

- BADLAND

- Castles in the Sky

- Gunpoint

- Remember Me

- The Stanley Parable



ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT

- Winner: Tearaway

- Beyond: Two Souls

- BioShock Infinite

- DEVICE 6

- Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

- The Last of Us



GAME INNOVATION

- Winner: Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Papers, Please

- Tearaway

- The Stanley Parable

- Year Walk



AUDIO ACHIEVEMENT

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Battlefield 4

- BioShock Infinite

- DEVICE 6

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Tomb Raider



ORIGINAL MUSIC

- Winner: Bioshock Infinite

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- Beyond: Two Souls

- Super Mario 3D World

- Tearaway

- The Last of Us



MOBILE AND HANDHELD

- Winner: Tearaway

- BADLAND

- DEVICE 6

- Plants vs. Zombies 2

- Ridiculous Fishing

- The Room Two



BRITISH GAME

- Winner: Grand Theft Auto 5

- Tearaway

- The Room Two

- LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

- Gunpoint

- DmC Devil May Cry



PERFORMER

- Winner: Ashley Johnson (Ellie - The Last of Us)

- Courtnee Draper (Elizabeth - BioShock Infinite)

- Ellen Page (Jodie - Beyond: Two Souls)

- Kevan Brighting (The Narrator - The Stanley Parable)

- Steven Ogg (Trevor Phillips - Grand Theft Auto 5)

- Troy Baker (Joel - The Last of Us)



BAFTA ONES TO WATCH AWARD

- Winner: Size Does Matter

- Project Heera: Diamond Heist

- The Unknown
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Bioshock Infinite – Burial at Sea: Episode 2 to offer a non-lethal challenge through 1998 mode">Burial at Sea







Irrational may be "winding down", but they still have one final flourish before bowing out. Burial at Sea: Episode 2 is the final piece of Bioshock Infinite DLC, and will give players the chance to inhabit the tear-opening, coin-tossing Elizabeth.



As an example of how differently the game's new protagonist will play, Irrational have also announced a new mode for the game. 1998 mode, like BInfinite's 1999 mode before it, is a "classic" difficulty designed to recapture the spirit of late '90s challenge. Rather than 1999's System Shock 2, 1998 mode is referencing the original Thief: The Dark Project. It will require players to complete the episode through entirely non-lethal methods. It will also replace the entirety of the soundtrack with Will Smith's Just The Two of Us, and Aerosmith's I Don't Wanna Miss a Thing.



Okay, so it won't really do that last thing.



"In Burial at Sea Episode Two we put a focus on balance and stealth mechanics," wrote Ken Levine, on the Irrational blog. "As we were developing this new style of gameplay, we started to see people self-impose non-lethal playthrough s. Given the fan reception of 1999 Mode, we thought it would be cool to give them another way to play Burial at Sea that challenged their mastery of stealth tools."



That sounds like an interesting departure for Bioshock combat. Stealth has never been a focus of the series, and a non-violent option has never before been possible. Especially in 2K Marin's Bioshock 2, where you had a massive drill attached to one of your arms.



In recognition of the mode, Irrational have produced a Thief-like mock box, from back in the days when game packaging could be a weird shape.







For our reactions to Irrational's closure, head over to our collective fond farewell.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Irrational Games: a fond farewell">Shodan







Last week Ken Levine announced that Irrational Games as we know it is coming to an end. Most of the team are to be laid off as the studio that gave us System Shock 2, SWAT 4, Freedom Force and Bioshock shuts its doors. The world knows them as the Bioshock developers, but for PC players, they've offered much more. We gather to reflect on the end of a great studio and celebrate their output.



Tim Clark

Group senior editor



Having experienced several redundancies firsthand, I feel beholden to say that it will be a hugely traumatic time for those involved and that our first thoughts should be with them. Equally, having been there, I know that those sort of public expressions of sympathy, however well meaning, ultimately feel hollow and don t help you make the rent. But completely selfishly, as someone who plays and writes about videogames, who loved the original BioShock and with minor caveats also loved Infinite, I feel a sadness that we won t be any more visiting worlds cut from Irrational s cloth.



Whatever your issues with those games themes and mechanics, in terms of pure art design there are few destinations in the canon as startling and memorable as Rapture s watery mausoleum and Columbia s star-spangled inferno. If you believe, as I at least partially do, Kieron Gillen s idea that games writing makes us travel journalists reporting from imaginary places, then it s hard not to (selfishly) see the closure of Irrational as also being the destruction of worlds we ll now never get to explore.



Sam Roberts

Editor, PC Gamer UK



I think BioShock popularised the first-person shooter/RPG hybrid, non-cutscene storytelling and moral choices in games that, to me, is Irrational s legacy, getting developers to rethink the presentation of story or the depth of their combat systems. System Shock 2 introduced much of what made BioShock special, but for many of those millions of players entering Rapture, this was an entirely new phenomenon that broadened their perception of what interactive narrative could achieve.



Infinite continued that, for me, and like BioShock explored the kind of mature subject matter that is rarely touched upon by triple-A games. That Infinite was contentious is fine with me it s big, beautiful and incomprehensible, but worth talking about in a way that games so rarely are.



The people at Irrational have changed immeasurably over the years, of course, but what a legacy to have every one of its seven titles be lauded by players and the press. That moniker will always stand for quality. If you re mourning the studio, I recommend listening to the Irrational podcasts, which offer a fascinating cross-section of a studio loaded with talented people it s a real sadness that this culture no longer exists, and I wish the very best to those affected by the closure.







Tom Senior

Web editor



"I am winding down Irrational Games as you know it," Ken Levine wrote last Tuesday. Whether or not the Irrational name lives on in Levine's new small new endeavour seems moot. This will be the end of Irrational's output as we know it. Console players will know Irrational as the BioShock developers, but we knew them first as the team behind System Shock 2 and SWAT 4. Their first game a cyberpunk horror set in a drifting space hulk, complete with a manic rogue AI. Their last a blitz through a collapsing society in a floating city. In between they made a great co-op friend-tasering sim called SWAT 4, and a superb superhero adventure Freedom Force. And Tribes Vengeance. Man. It s painful to lose a studio with the imagination and boldness to build those worlds.



It's a sad fact that studios are downsized, moved and disbanded all the time, but Levine's message, in which he seems to take personal responsibility for the studio's downsizing, has made this a slightly unusual case. Overzealous corners of the internet jumped on the wording of the post in minutes. The idea of a great studio meeting its demise at the hands of an auteur gone mad is seductively simple, and travels well in 140 characters.



The real story is likely a more familiar one. The huge costs of blockbuster development continue to grow, and Infinite languished in development for many years. In the high-level staff changes, rumours of scrapped multiplayer modes and regular delays, there were hints at a fraught development process. In that scenario even millions of sales can deliver below-estimate profits. A few years back, 2K Marin were smushed into 2K Australia. Like any publisher, Take Two are happy to reform their brace of studios. But with Irrational breaking up, who will take over the Shock series?



It won't be Ken Levine. He's heading up a team of 15 to work on "highly replayable" games that are "narrative-driven." Perhaps he's taking notes from the success of former Irrational and 2K Marin designer Steve Gaynor and, formerly of 2K Marin, Karla Zimonja. With Johnnemann Nordhagen they founded the Fullbright Company, who turned around their narrative-driven debut game, Gone Home, in less than two years to critical success.



If market forces have put an end to Irrational, then the studio has suffered the same fate as Thief and System Shock developers, Looking Glass Studios. The parallels between the two stretch beyond their shared staff members. The design ethos that built System Shock has filtered into the BioShock games, and there's tremendous variety to the output of both studios. Irrational's demise is a blow, but those design ideas, and the flair and skill that went into the construction of the floating city of Columbia will continue to coarse through the industry, as the talent of Looking Glass and Ion Storm did in the 2000s. I'll remember them for the clinical blue-white corridors of the Von Braun, the disturbing scenes at the Fairfax residence in SWAT 4, and those tense first steps into Bioshock's lighthouse. We'll surely see flashes of Irrational's brilliance in many games to come.



Wes Fenlon

Features Editor



BioShock was a masterful maze of abandoned homes and once-thriving businesses, with the remnants of former lives told through scattered items and bodies and audio logs. It had personality, even when it was haunting. But nothing else in the game could compare to Fort Frolic, the weirdest, creepiest, funniest place in Rapture. It's easily my favorite level in BioShock, and one of the most evocative video game levels I've ever played. Sander Cohen's artistic presence permeates every corner of Fort Frolic he made that part of Rapture his canvas, and he painted it with madness.



Later in the game, the showdown with Andrew Ryan is BioShock's big thematic reveal. It says something very direct about how we play games, and player choice, and the dissonance between our thoughts and actions. But Fort Frolic has a subtle, perfect moment of dissonance of its own, when The Nutcracker's Waltz of the Flowers begins playing and Cohen's horribly disfigured, beautifully acrobatic Splicer ballerinas come for your life. I was in awe, and completely freaked, as I ran from the Splicers, the music crescendoed, and Cohen yelled "Smile! Smile!" in the background.



The dissonance between the Waltz's beauty and the game's horror that's the moment from BioShock that's going to stick with me forever, and it's on a shortlist of never-forget gaming memories for me. It's a shame that everyone at Irrational who collaborated to make that moment possible artists and animators and writers and sound designers won't have a chance to make another one together.





Phil Savage

Staff writer



It feels callous to look to the future when so many of the studio's staff will now be looking to secure their present. The thing I hope for is that, as Irrational's former employees move on to new things, the ideas and ambition that the studio strived to achieve will germinate throughout the industry. A lot of studios are going to be hiring some phenomenal talent, and I suspect a lot of new indie teams are about to appear as well. Both are an exciting prospect, because, while few development teams could boast the budget of late-era Irrational, the design-led philosophy has already paid dividends for smaller, more focused games.



It's telling that two of PC Gamer's favourite games of last year Gone Home and Card Hunter had former Irrational staff among their teams. One provided an engaging, character-led narrative through atmosphere and exploration, while the other deftly weaved two genres into a inventive and satisfying hybrid.



There's been plenty of speculation about whether the type of games Irrational make have a future. Really, it depends on whether you associate them with sprawling spectacle, or systemic diversity. I'd argue that Irrational's strength from System Shock 2 through to BioShock Infinite has been in the latter, and in the way their systems filtered through to the story and presentation. Those lessons can be applied whatever sized game someone's making.



Whether from Levine, his former staff, or other developers who are inspired by their games, Irrational's legacy will be felt for a long time to come.



Cory Banks

Managing Editor



I want to be angry about Irrational Games. I want someone to blame. I could be furious at Ken Levine, the studio s creative director and head honcho, who authored the press release revealing that Irrational as you know it was going away. How dare he fire 90 percent of the studio s staff, just so he can make smaller games? Because surely it was just that simple, right?



Or maybe I blame Take-Two Interactive. It s been speculated that BioShock Infinite, Irrational s final game, took so long to make and had such a troubled development period that the game s $4 million in sales isn t enough profit for the bigwigs. Maybe, says the Internet, Take-Two decided to pull the plug on the beloved studio, and kept Levine around because he s one of the few "name" developers left. Because that's what corporations do, right?



Maybe I just blame the dying Triple-A videogame, or retail shops that charge too much for games and drive customers away, or any number of other variables. Would that make me feel better?



No.



The fact that Irrational Games is gone at least as we know it is sad, as is the fact that so many talented developers, engineers, producers, quality assurance testers, and other staff now face the uncertainty of knowing where their next paycheck is coming from. And I want to yell and scream and turn on Caps Lock and launch my fury out into the ether. But it won t help.



What does help, at least for me, is believing that Levine and Take-Two are doing everything they say to help the team that made BioShock Infinite find new jobs. So does remembering that talented people can move on and continue to make their art. And what will ease the immediate pain is going back to play the games that made me love Irrational in the first place: System Shock 2, Freedom Force, SWAT 4, BioShock. Instead of raging against the machines for transgressions I neither know to be true or even understand, I choose to remember and enjoy the games that will be Irrational's legacy. It's not the act of a revolutionary, but it's the best I've got.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Irrational Games “winding down,” Ken Levine starting smaller team within Take-Two">Levine







Today, Ken Levine announced that Irrational Games will be winding down as we know it after it releases the last piece of DLC for BioShock Infinite. Levine will be starting a smaller, "more entrepreneurial" endeavor at Take-Two, which also worked with him on the BioShock games. Unfortunately, this means Irrational will let go of all but 15 employees.



Levine co-founded Irrational Games seventeen years ago with Jon Chey and Rob Fermier. The studio has developed BioShock, BioShock Infinite, Freedom Force, SWAT 4, and others.



"Seventeen years is a long time to do any job, even the best one. And working with the incredible team at Irrational Games is indeed the best job I've ever had," Levine said in a message on Irrational's official site. "While I m deeply proud of what we've accomplished together, my passion has turned to making a different kind of game than we've done before. To meet the challenge ahead, I need to refocus my energy on a smaller team with a flatter structure and a more direct relationship with gamers. In many ways, it will be a return to how we started: a small team making games for the core gaming audience."



Levine said that in time he will announce a new endeavor, which will aim to make narrative-driven games for "core" gamers that reward multiple playthroughs, that focus on direct relationship with fans, and dedicated to delivering digital content exclusively.



The laid off members of Irrational will receive financial support, access to the office to put together their portfolios, and offered opportunities within Take-Two.



Levine also said that Irrational will do its best to update the site with an FAQ.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to BioShock Infinite – Burial At Sea: Episode 2 gets a spoilery behind-the-scenes video">levine







Ever since Irrational Games announced that its BioShock Infinite downloadable content would take place in Rapture, fans have speculated about how the worlds in the BioShock franchise could be connected. As we get ever closer to the release of Burial At Sea Episode 2, a new, very spoilery video starts to hint at answers while showing off a whole host of returning characters from both Rapture and Columbia.



Seriously, spoilers ahead. You've been warned.



The video, billed as a "behind the scenes" look at Episode 2, shows the sheer number of characters and returning voice actors we can look forward to. Courtnee Draper returns as Elizabeth, this time as the lead protagonist that players will control. Troy Baker is also back, as Infinite anti-hero Booker DeWitt. But many of the original actors from BioShock 1 will return as well, which means you can expect to see Andrew Ryan and Atlas in your adventures through Rapture.



Most interestingly, actress Kimberly Brooks will return in Episode Two as BioShock Infinite's Daisy Fitzroy. How Fitzroy makes it from Columbia's reality to Rapture isn't shown, but it's big news that she factors into the game.



We also get our first glimpse of the first-person view for Elizabeth, specifically in a shot of her watching an Andrew Ryan video while holding a pistol.



Irrational Creative Director Ken Levine says at the end of the video that fans will feel a "sense of completeness" at the end of Episode 2. Will this be the end of the BioShock story? We'll have to wait until March 25, when Episode 2 of Burial at Sea is available, before we can know for sure.



PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to BioShock paraphernalia coming to Team Fortress 2">Biohats







Has the desire for hats, hats, delicious TF2 hats diminished over the last few years, or is the public's interest in digital head-adornment as strong as ever? I ask because Valve and Irrational are adding BioShock clobber to Team Fortress 2, and- hey, don't all load up the game at once. You'll need to buy BioShock Infinite's season pass on Steam to gain access to it, which I believe comes with a few pieces of downloadable content in addition to a very small selection of hats. Full details here.



The items are only available until the 25th of March - the date that Burial at Sea part 2 is scheduled to release - and comprise a Mister Bubbles doll, a George Washington and a Benjamin Franklin mask. It's not a whole lot of content, but if you still play TF2 and you already own a season pass, then free stuff is always nice, I guess. Here's a pic of that digital clobber, as modelled by the cast of TF2:



PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Bioshock Infinite: Burial at Sea – Episode 2 release date announced">Burial at Sea Episode 2







Bioshock Infinite: Burial at Sea - Episode 2 is an impressively long DLC name, to the point that it's almost a shame they didn't go all the way. Why not hark back to the heyday of ridiculously long PC expansions and call it Bioshock Infinite: Burial at Sea - Episode 2: Steampunk Boogaloo (This Time, It's Elizabeth)? I would happily step through into that alternate reality. Back in this one, though, Irrational have announced the release date for their second bit of BInfinite story DLC. Episode 2 will arrive on March 25th.



In Burial at Sea Episode Two, we are delivering a story that involves nearly every major character from the original BioShock and BioShock Infinite, sayeth Ken Levine in a press release. It is a story that will give gamers a new perspective on the BioShock universe and conclude the story of BioShock Infinite and Burial at Sea.



Irrational say that the episode will be built "almost entirely" from scratch, suggesting we'll get to see more new perspectives on Rapture. This time around, we'll be controlling Elizabeth, and Irrational are promising the introduction of new weapons and "stealth-oriented gameplay".



Burial at Sea - Episode 2 will be free for owners of the BInfinite Season Pass, and will cost $15 for everybody else.
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