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PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Hear three BioShock Infinite: Burial At Sea original songs from Irrational Games">Bioshock-Infinite-Burial-at-Sea-1-610x347





BioShock Infinite had some great original songs and arrangements. You can buy the original game s soundtrack, but there s some new music in the recently released Burial at Sea DLC that you couldn't easily listen to, until recently. Irrational Games posted three full, original songs from Burial at Sea to its official website, along with some commentary from the game s Music Director, Jim Bonney.

Bonney describes the first song, Little Sisters Song, as an idealistic musical conversation between Mama Tenenbaum and the little sisters. I was thinking about ways to create depth in daily life in Rapture, and thought that the Little Sisters Home could use a little propaganda music, he said. A song that would ease the minds of the citizens that little girls being taken from their families was really just another example of living the Objectivist s Dream!





The Pie Song, which is in the style of a 50s folk protest song, was produced by Marc Lacuesta and performed by Korby Lenker.



And the final song is Old Man Winter Jingle, which promotes the Old Man Winter Plasmid. The announcer you hear in the end is actually Irrational Games Senior Sound Designer Jeff Seamster.





For more behind the scenes stories on original music in Bioshock Infinite, check out Irrational Games official blog.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to 4K Screenshot Showcase: Bioshock Infinite">Bioshock infinite 4k header







Every Monday, keen screen-grabber Ben Griffin brings you a sumptuous 4K resolution gallery to celebrate PC gaming's prettiest places.



Few would deny that Bioshock Infinite's floating city of Columbia is a gorgeous place to shoot spliced-up weirdos. The first sight of Columbia's main square is impossible to forget. It's a blaze of glorious colour, enriched with hundreds of incidental details, all contributing a little to the story behind Infinite's hovering dystopia. There are many more moments to match it, so we've captured a few here in glorious 4k resolution to celebrate Infinite's terrific art design. Enjoy.







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Shacknews - Andrew Yoon
Burial at Sea marks the end of Irrational Games' work on the BioShock series. Nay, it marks the end of Irrational as we know it. The studio has been doing a number of send-offs, including the most recent "thank you": the release of three full-length songs from the BioShock expansion.
Community Announcements - OneLetter
Click here for the Steam Store page

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0JAv8ija8U

BioShock Infinite: Burial at Sea – Episode Two is available starting today. Check out this launch trailer to get a glimpse of the final episode of the Burial at Sea saga and the conclusion of BioShock Infinite. See the world through the eyes of Elizabeth, as she continues her journey through Rapture in a film noir-style story that provides players with a different perspective on the BioShock universe. This add-on pack is also included in the BioShock Infinite Season Pass.
Product Release - Valve
BioShock Infinite: Burial at Sea - Episode Two, all new content for BioShock Infinite is Now Available on Steam!
See the world through Elizabeth’s eyes in BioShock Infinite: Burial at Sea – Episode Two. Set immediately after the conclusion of Burial at Sea – Episode One, this final episode puts you in the role of Elizabeth as she journeys through Rapture in an effort to rescue the little sister she abandoned.  Developed by Irrational Games, the studio behind the original BioShock and BioShock Infinite, this continuation of the Burial at Sea saga features parts of Rapture you’ve never seen before, incudes modified stealth-oriented gameplay that brings you new weapons and plasmids, and involves nearly every major character from the original BioShock and BioShock Infinite. BioShock Infinite: Burial at Sea - Episode Two is the last of three BioShock Infinite add-on packs and it concludes the storyline of BioShock Infinite and Burial at Sea. This pack is included in the BioShock Infinite Season Pass and will contain new Trophies.

Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alec Meer)

BioShock Infinite’s DLC, BioShock Infinite and BioShock 1 concludes with this second, longer, stealthier half of last November’s return to Rapture. It’s out now. >

You’ll hear no politics from me, though by God it’s tempting to correlate Burial At Sea Part 2′s status as a swansong for two BioShock universes with the recent, shock closure of Irrational. Whatever else there is to both tales, at least this concluding DLC for BioShock Infinite reverses the sense of decline we’ve seen since the original BioShock. Despite a multitude of sins it does leapfrog both Infinite and its own, irritatingly slight if visually flabbergasting Part 1. It also includes the single most unpleasant – and frankly needless with it – moment I’ve ever experienced in a videogame. … [visit site to read more]

PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Bioshock Infinite: Burial at Sea episode two review">Episode 2 Intro







A lot happens in the opening moments of Burial at Sea: Episode 2. You'll meander through a Disneyfied version of Paris, one that's a garlic garland short of full stereotype; be threatened by Atlas back in the post-Episode 1 version of Rapture; and discuss pseudo-quantum science with an incorporeal Booker. As a concentrated dollop of Bioshock lore, it's alienating but also strangely liberating. Halfway through Infinite, we started to jump the infini-sharks, now the game is willing its players to give in and enjoy the view.



This time, you're playing as Elizabeth. Only, for reasons directly tied to the opening whirlwind of plot, it's an Elizabeth that's no longer omniscient, or able to open tears. What she can do is bonk splicers on the back of the head with a Sky-Hook a trick that comes in useful as you work through more remnants of Fontaine's department store/sunken prison.



Significantly more fragile than Booker, Elizabeth has no shield and a limited set of weapons. Stealth is the focus for the first time in the series, and the new weapons and plasmids have been designed for that purpose. The most useful of these is Peeping Tom, which doubles up as both X-ray vision and invisibility, but you'll also find tranquiliser darts and a selection of lethal weapons that provide options when sneaking fails.







As a set of systems, the stealth is simplified and exaggerated, but nonetheless entertaining to play with. The near-sighted splicers suggest that Ryan's objectivism failed to attract any opticians, so vision is less a factor in discovery than noise. As Elizabeth crouch-walks through the levels, she won't raise any alarms on regular surfaces, but shattered glass and water puddles produce an almost comedic cacophony that alerts anyone in the vicinity.



Although it's not the most elegant introduction of stealth, it works because of the pacing and smooth escalation of difficulty. Episode 2 is much slower than Episode 1's frantic resource scavenging, and that more deliberate pace gels well with the series' emphasis on fully exploring its environments. More than that, though, with the focus no longer on all-out combat, I found those moments when I was forced to go loud pulling out the shotgun to blast my way out of danger a refreshing change, rather than an increasingly stale necessity.



It turns out that deranged magical junkies aren't the smartest of pursuers, so escape from their immediate vision and they'll quickly lose track of your location. In the more open areas this can be as simple as leaping towards a ceiling hook, at which point you can land in a crouch behind the nearest splicer to deliver an unseen melee attack from behind. Here, it feels like an incredibly basic version of Arkham's gargoyle sections, but the satisfying and speedy swooping across rooms still nicely punctuates the periods of caution.







With no Booker to aid, Elizabeth no longer spends her time tossing ammo and coins. There are still locks to be picked though, and that means a mini-game. As with the other new systems, it's a pretty basic interaction. The pick automatically moves back and forth a series of tumblers, requiring you to make a selection. These can't be failed, but certain tumblers are colour-coded. Hit a red one, and an alarm goes off, drawing any nearby splicers. Pick a blue one, and you're given a noisemaker dart useful for distracting groups of enemies, or the unkillable Big Daddy that roams an early hub area.



Thorough exploration rewards with plasmid upgrades that drastically improve your abilities. Maxing out the Peeping Tom, I was able to turn invisible at no cost to Eve as long as I remained immobile. In some respects it feels overpowered, to the point that I rarely felt threatened across the just-under-four hours of my normal difficulty playthrough. In the new 1998 mode, which only allows for non-lethal takedowns, being able to easily slip away feels like a more integral ability.



As a whole, Episode 2 feels like the most cohesive Bioshock Infinite campaign. It's certainly more so than Episode 1, which had a hard divide separating its combat and story. But even the main game's action-oriented combat was often at odds with its attempts to present a living world. Here, Elizabeth is always in danger, and always the outsider creeping unseen through a world she isn't part of. In this, the character and combat are completely in sync.







It also helps that Elizabeth is perhaps the most likeable protagonist of the series. As haunted and flawed as any other Bioshock lead, she carries that burden with a sorrow that makes her all the more sympathetic. Over the years, the Bioshocks have utilised elements of horror, mystery, science-fiction and detective noir. In Episode 2, at a character level, it also makes for an effective tragedy.



It's let down by an overarching plot that feels inconsequential, despite this episode being significantly more substantial than the first. At times it tips into self-indulgence specifically with a ham-fisted retconning of the Vox Populi's most controversial story beat. Throughout, this final expansion plays around in plot holes that never needed filling, which makes for an unsatisfying resolution.



As Irrational's final work, Episode 2 is a fitting epitaph; both in its ability to offer a fresh perspective on the series, and in the way it obsesses over past triumphs.
Product Release - Valve
Save 75% on BioShock Infinite as part of this week's Weekend Deal*!

Last chance to buy the Bioshock Infinite Season Pass and get exclusive TF2 Items!

Indebted to the wrong people, with his life on the line, veteran of the U.S. Cavalry and now hired gun, Booker DeWitt has only one opportunity to wipe his slate clean. He must rescue Elizabeth, a mysterious girl imprisoned since childhood and locked up in the flying city of Columbia. Forced to trust one another, Booker and Elizabeth form a powerful bond during their daring escape. Together, they learn to harness an expanding arsenal of weapons and abilities, as they fight on zeppelins in the clouds, along high-speed Sky-Lines, and down in the streets of Columbia, all while surviving the threats of the air-city and uncovering its dark secret.

*Offer ends Tuesday at 10AM Pacific Time.

PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Papers, Please and Gone Home take BAFTA Awards, Houser brothers make rare appearance for Rockstar’s Fellowship">BAFTA







I'm not going to sugar-coat this for you: last night's BAFTA Game Awards didn't end with the PC hunched under an unbearable weight of face gold. The platform struggled against heavy hitting console match-three games, like The Last of Us, and Grand Theft Auto 5. Even so, there were awards for indie gems Papers, Please and Gone Home, and multi-platform titles like Bioshock Infinite. In addition, the reclusive Rockstar heads showed up in person to accept their BAFTA fellowship. You can find that video, and a full list of winners, below.



Also, before the big list, be sure to check out the BAFTA Steam sale that's running until later today. There are some particularly great deals in there, like the excellent XCOM: Enemy Within for a ridiculously low 5/$7.50.



BAFTA FELLOWSHIP

- Winner: Rockstar Games







BEST GAME

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Papers, Please

- Super Mario 3D World

- Tearaway



ACTION AND ADVENTURE

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- BADLAND

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

- Tomb Raider



STRATEGY AND SIMULATION

- Winner: Papers, Please

- Civilization 5: Brave New World

- Democracy 3

- Forza Motorsport 5

- Surgeon Simulator 2013

- XCOM: Enemy Within



MULTIPLAYER

- Winner: Grand Theft Auto 5

- Battlefield 4

- Dota 2

- Super Mario 3D World

- The Last of Us

- World of Tanks



SPORTS

- Winner: Fifa 14

- F1 2013

- Football Manager 2014

- Forza Motorsport 5

- Grid 2

- NBA 2K14



FAMILY

- Winner: Tearaway

- Animal Crossing: New Leaf

- Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

- Rayman Legends

- Skylanders SWAP Force

- Super Mario 3D World



STORY

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

- Gone Home

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

- The Stanley Parable



GAME DESIGN

- Winner: Grand Theft Auto 5

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- Papers, Please

- Tearaway

- The Last of Us

- Tomb Raider



DEBUT GAME

- Gone Home

- BADLAND

- Castles in the Sky

- Gunpoint

- Remember Me

- The Stanley Parable



ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT

- Winner: Tearaway

- Beyond: Two Souls

- BioShock Infinite

- DEVICE 6

- Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

- The Last of Us



GAME INNOVATION

- Winner: Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Papers, Please

- Tearaway

- The Stanley Parable

- Year Walk



AUDIO ACHIEVEMENT

- Winner: The Last of Us

- Battlefield 4

- BioShock Infinite

- DEVICE 6

- Grand Theft Auto 5

- Tomb Raider



ORIGINAL MUSIC

- Winner: Bioshock Infinite

- Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag

- Beyond: Two Souls

- Super Mario 3D World

- Tearaway

- The Last of Us



MOBILE AND HANDHELD

- Winner: Tearaway

- BADLAND

- DEVICE 6

- Plants vs. Zombies 2

- Ridiculous Fishing

- The Room Two



BRITISH GAME

- Winner: Grand Theft Auto 5

- Tearaway

- The Room Two

- LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

- Gunpoint

- DmC Devil May Cry



PERFORMER

- Winner: Ashley Johnson (Ellie - The Last of Us)

- Courtnee Draper (Elizabeth - BioShock Infinite)

- Ellen Page (Jodie - Beyond: Two Souls)

- Kevan Brighting (The Narrator - The Stanley Parable)

- Steven Ogg (Trevor Phillips - Grand Theft Auto 5)

- Troy Baker (Joel - The Last of Us)



BAFTA ONES TO WATCH AWARD

- Winner: Size Does Matter

- Project Heera: Diamond Heist

- The Unknown
Shacknews - Andrew Yoon
The latest trailer for BioShock Infinite's upcoming Burial at Sea conclusion is not only a marketing tool meant to entice you to buy the DLC, but it's also a portfolio for studio members affected by Irrational's sudden closure. In addition to footage, the trailer clearly points out what each team member contributed, and offers easy links to their resumes. That's a pretty classy act--all things considered.
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