Community Announcements - Raidor [dph]
TopWare Interactive and Reality Pump studios have some exciting news! We are pleased to announce that after earning multiple awards and selling over ten million units, Reality Pump Studios has officially begun work on the third part of our blockbuster RPG series, Two Worlds!
Two Worlds III is currently in the concept stage and scheduled for development over the next 36 months. Keep an eye out for further announcements.
And that’s not all! We’re also excited to announce a major engine update for Two Worlds II, and we’re going to need it, because while we’re laying down the basics for the third installment in the series, this year we’re also going to be releasing eight new Two Worlds II multiplayer maps and two brand-new, single-player Two Worlds II DLCs, Call of the Tenebrae and Shattered Embrace!
The first DLC, entitled Two Worlds II: Call of the Tenebrae will be available at the end of Q2 2016 and focuses on the Hero’s return to Antaloor, where he witnesses the shocking murder of DarPha! The killers are a never-before-seen tribe of hideous, rat-like creatures known only as “The Chosen”, who control a mysterious, powerful new magic! Their genocidal plot threatens every living creature in Antaloor, and it’s up to the Hero to find a way to stop them!
Expect to experience Antaloor like never before with the new engine update for Two Worlds II!
Also available for Linux and the Steam OS, the newly updated engine allows for a much higher level of character and landscape detail, an HD-GUI, in addition to tons of in-game achievements, co-op multiplayer, and lots of new in-game features and upgrades!
For more information on the first single-player DLC for Two Worlds II, Call of the Tenebrae, and all the exciting new things happening in the Two Worlds universe, please visit http://cot.twoworlds2.com/
Community Announcements - Raidor [dph]
The official Strategy Guides for Two Worlds II and TW2 - Pirates of the Flying Fortress are available in the Steam Store in English, German and French.
Community Announcements - Raidor [dph]
we recently created Trading Cards for the game. 15 cards, 5 Profile Backgrounds and 5 Emoticons are available. Cards drop every 20 minutes playing time.
Community Announcements - Raidor [dph]
we added the Steam Trading Cards Feature to the game. Have fun!
Announcement - Valve
Today's Deal: Save 80% on Two Worlds II series*!

Look for the deals each day on the front page of Steam. Or follow us on twitter or Facebook for instant notifications wherever you are!

*Offer ends Saturday at 10AM Pacific Time

Announcement - Valve
Check out the Polish Bundle during this week's Midweek Madness*!

This Pack includes:
*Offer ends Thursday at 4PM Pacific Time.
Announcement - Valve
Today's Deal: Save 75% off the Two Worlds II!

Look for the deals each day on the front page of Steam. Or follow us on twitter or Facebook for instant notifications wherever you are!

Product Update - Valve
- Defense DLC (new multiplayer game mode with 5 new maps) added
- Two multiplayer Duell maps added.
- Additional languages Russian, Polish and Czech added

Product Update - Valve
- updated to version 1.3.5, contains some fixes of some rare crash bugs
- Additional languages Russian, Polish and Czech added

Kotaku

I've Never Seen a Magic System in a Video Game Without Glaring FlawsIn today's magically delicious episode of Speak Up on Kotaku, commenter Chris P. Bacon claims that while not one video game has portrayed magic perfectly, several have come close. He should know. He is a wizard.


I've always been a fan of magic users in games. A magician who always has a bag of tricks for any situation and an ace in the sleeve should all else fail. A sorcerer who can reshape reality with unthinkable powers. But, to this date, I've never seen a magic system in a videogame without a few glaring flaws.


Why is it that a warrior or rogue can jog an unlimited distance then swing a weapon for minutes on end while never breaking a sweat or slowing down even slightly, yet wizards often find themselves out of magic and just standing there with little to do. Muscles never tire, and yet magic energy from some unknown impossible source often does.


Now, of course magic needs its limitations, otherwise there would be no reason not to blast the strongest spell all day over and over again. A cooldown system is a fine enough choice, yet it becomes very robotic, going through a consistent rotation of the same spells thoughtlessly just about everywhere.


Then, there's the D&D style, as used in, for example, Baldur's Gate 2 wherein you think of what spells you'll want tomorrow within limited slots then fall asleep until you can use them 8 hours later. It's rather clunky, yet it does cause you to go through everything in your spellbook according to the direness of the situation. It does seem rather silly that a whole party has to wait 8 hours for the wizard to take a nap before he casts one little remove curse spell. Or resurrecting a dead friend first thing in the morning before you brush your teeth.


I should add here that I do love the game Magicka. Big spells took a little time to type in as quickly as you could, practice and premeditation definitely helped, walking was slow when ready to cast so you can't instantly disintegrate enemies on sight, you never just run out of steam and stand there like a dope, and there was all sorts of interesting combinations to try, always a perfect tool for the job. The only drawback is that this system required a very particular control scheme, one that not every game will necessarily facilitate. Also, no one I know owned the game so I just played it single player about a dozen times over and over.


Another honorable mention should go to Two Worlds 2, getting the spell cards and elemental levels was a pain and it was still a mana bar system but it did allow creativity, fun experimenting, and a certain uniqueness between every mage who didn't go with a cookie cutter I-read-it-off-the-internet model.


I thought of a method that may be interesting to try which combines the D&D model and the basic mana bar. You can preselect a limited number of spells which cast instantly but at variable mana costs. But you can also cast from your entire spellbook at variable casting times which leaves you open and mostly stationary. This way you can choose between a quick burst of instant offensive magic or a collection of defensive spells to be used quickly, but non-clutch needs such as long-term damage per second and basic over-time healing can be cast without eventually getting tired and watching someone swing a 6 foot long greatsword for the rest of the fight without as much as needing to sit down in a chair to catch his breath.


What are some other games systems or your thoughts on how magic should best be handled?


About Speak Up on Kotaku: Our readers have a lot to say, and sometimes what they have to say has nothing to do with the stories we run. That's why we have a forum on Kotaku called Speak Up. That's the place to post anecdotes, photos, game tips and hints, and anything you want to share with Kotaku at large. Every weekday we'll pull one of the best Speak Up posts we can find and highlight it here.
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