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As revealed last week, two of video games' biggest zombie-centric franchises will be bumping uglies when crossover content for the PC versions of Resident Evil 6 and Left 4 Dead 2 hits in in two weeks. This video shows what it looks like when Coach, Nick, Ellis and Rochelle take on the BOWs of Capcom's global apocalypse, with Special Infected enemies from L4D2 popping in to mix things up. Remember this undead mash-up won't cost anything so look for it as an added option on April 5th.


Kotaku

Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Suddenly, the mother of all zombie apocalypses is about to happen. This just wound up in our inbox:




Capcom and Valve are pleased to announce the Resident Evil® 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 project. This crossover project between two of the interactive entertainment industry's most respected publishers will see characters from Left 4 Dead™ 2 featured exclusively in the forthcoming PC version of Resident Evil® 6, while enemies from Resident Evil 6 will invade the PC version of Left 4 Dead 2. All content will be made available completely free for fans of either game to access and play.



Owners of Resident Evil 6 PC will be able to select one of four survivors from Left 4 Dead 2's iconic cast – Coach, Nick, Ellis and Rochelle – when playing PC exclusive mode, The Mercenaries No Mercy. Each character will have a special customized weapon load-out created just for use in Resident Evil 6. In addition to the four survivors, two of the infamous Special Infected zombies from the Left 4 Dead franchise – the Witch and Mini Tank – will also make a cameo appearance in this mode, relentlessly attacking players regardless of whether a character from Left 4 Dead 2 or Resident Evil 6 is chosen. This new and exclusive content will automatically be downloaded in the background to all owners of the PC version of Resident Evil 6 from April 5.



Making the leap to the PC version of Left 4 Dead 2 will be some of Resident Evil 6's most fearsome enemies – Lepotitsa, Napad and Ogroman. All three characters were brought to life in Left 4 Dead 2 by Valve's renowned developers using its Steam Workshop tools. Owners of the PC version of Left 4 Dead 2 will be able to face a new deadly challenge when Resident Evil 6 characters infect Valve's classic zombie title this spring.



Commenting on the crossover project, Chet Faliszek from Valve stated: "We're huge Resident Evil fans, so when the opportunity arose to work directly with Capcom to combine L4D2 and RE6, we jumped at it."



Resident Evil 6 Producer Yoshiaki Hirabayashi added: "The Resident Evil 6 team really enjoyed working on this crossover, and we're confident that our fans will have a great time with it too! We hope you enjoy this unique content."




More as we learn it.



Update:









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Here's a developer diary from RE6 producer Yoshiaki Hirabayashi, courtesy of Capcom.




Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE] Capcom and Valve Team Up for Free Resident Evil 6 x Left 4 Dead 2 Crossover [UPDATE]


Kotaku

Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam WorkshopValve just recently moved Steam Workshop out of beta, and we're already seeing a ton of great mods ready for your clicking.



We've had access to mods before, that's nothing new. But Valve's Steam Workshop completely streamlines the process of adding them in, making the ability to have smarter AI, new weapons and newly skinned enemies an easier process than ever before. And databased, too!



So what's out there now, roughly four days after its official release? Here are a few that caught my eye.



Beautiful, changing skies



Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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A Helm's Deep map


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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An Aperture space station map


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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Playing as friggin' velociraptors


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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A Crash Bandicoot map


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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Warrior Bug enemies


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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A super-sexy Coach in formal wear


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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Team Fortress 2's Scout as a Hunter


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



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The Gabe Newell of Boomers


Here Are A Bunch Of Wonderful Left 4 Dead 2 Mods Courtesy Of Steam Workshop



Source





There are a ton of other maps, skins for the four playable characters, skins for enemies, heck, skins for the defibrillator and ammo packs. There are weapons, from melee and assault rifles to machine guns and grenades. There are menu tweaks and UI changes. New soundtracks and sound effects. Just a metric crapton of things you probably don't need but, hey, you can download now.
Kotaku

Valve Considers Resubmitting Left 4 Dead 2 for Australian ClassificationYou may remember that, nearly four years ago, Australia's classification board refused to classify Left 4 Dead 2, effectively banning it from sale in the country. At the time, Australia's ratings system for video games topped out at MA15+, which basically means suitable for teenagers. Valve released a highly sanitized version of the game just for Australia, disappointing many and calling attention to the country's insufficient ratings policies.



Well, in the three-plus years since, Australia has gotten its act together. On Jan. 1, a new R18+ rating went into effect (Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge was the first to claim it.) Fans down under are wondering if Valve is keen to revisit the subject with a fully unedited Left 4 Dead 2. Writing on Valve's official forums, Chet Faliszek says yes.



"We have been exploring the options here and what we can legally do," he said.

"We will have more information on this when we understand the issues fully and how we are moving forward."



The game was submitted and refused, the decision was appealed, and the appeal was denied. It sounds like Valve isn't yet certain if Left 4 Dead 2 is eligible for a re-review under a new rating, or if an old decision is final no matter what.



Still, any expense of resubmitting Left 4 Dead 2 for classification "doesn't worry us," he added. "This is something we want to do."



Valve investigating R18+ options for Left 4 Dead 2 in Australia [GameSpot]


Kotaku





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Some people might tell you that Donkey Kong 64 is an awful game. According to 10 year old me (my age the last time I played that game), they'd be wrong. But, hopefully everyone can agree that the Donkey Kong rap is fantastic?



Now, take that catchy tune, and add the Left 4 Dead zombies. What do you get? This amazing thing by YouTube user EdbotnikThe's.



Keep an eye on the witch.



L4DK Rap [EdbotnikThe's]


Kotaku

The Best Things In Video Games Are Broken I finally saw Wreck-It Ralph over the Thanksgiving break. It was heartwarming, delightful, charming. It nudged at some big-name titles in ways that made me giggle and nod in recognition. It covered the bases of a handful of video game tropes. It made jokes in the form of clever puns and cute character behavior.



But my favorite part about Wreck-It Ralph was an admission. An admission that, hey, sometimes what's unintentional in a video game is what's best about it.



Let me explain. If you don't know, Wreck-It Ralph brings the arcade environment to life. I don't mean that the film resuscitated the dying era of quarters used in exchange for playing games amongst fellow gamers in a public setting. I mean that video game characters come to literal life in the film, all connected to one another in this arcade world.



[Minor Wreck-It Ralph spoilers follow]



One such character is a little girl named Vanellope, living in a made-up racing video game called Sugar Rush. As a glitch in the system, she's been shunned from the rest of the game's community of characters, fated to live out her virtual days in some hidden cave she can glitch her way into. She's not allowed to race with everyone else—for fear of her pixlexia (as she calls it) having a negative impact on the game—even though racing is what she wants more than anything.



But being a glitch makes Vanellope a unique racer. She can jump and blip in and out of place, acting sort of like a power-up boost and in effect confusing everyone around her. Is that a heinous crime against the game's programming, though? Flat-out cheating? Or is that just a nifty, granted unintended feature when used properly?



***

Those unintended features sometimes make games even greater. Take Left 4 Dead 2, also known as one of the most addictive games I've ever played. Seriously, I've played every DLC, every mode, and every special event that game had to offer. And then I replayed it.



But one of my best discoveries in Left 4 Dead 2 is a particularly awesome glitch that completely lags out the game.



Why would you want to intentionally lag your game? Because Expert difficulty is damn hard. Or at least that's why a group of Xbox Live friends and I first decided to do it. Before it evolved into one of the most fun, community-created unofficial modes.







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Here's what you do. Grab dual pistols, find a melee weapon. Swap between dual wielding the guns to quickly grabbing the melee weapon. Being crammed into a corner usually helps. Eventually you'll start to create a huge mass of duplicated pistols spawning hilariously out of your back.



When enough duplicates are made, your game will start to lag out. As a bonus, I liked to play the Mutation DLC that grants you unlimited chainsaw fuel (known as Chainsaw Massacre). Lagging the game out feels like you're skipping through the map, generally keeping to the main path and trying to avoid zombies, stopping only to slice your way through any that happen across your immediate path. The goal is to rush through each level straight to the safe room.



But what's fun about that? Besides cheat-winning your way through each map on Expert mode, you'd be surprised how much this glitch impacts the way you play the game. I mentioned that it's best to speed through to the end of each level, avoiding bumping into zombies as much as you can. You can essentially run at your normal pace, while the flesh-eating creepers struggle to catch up to you. Playing with unlimited chainsaws is optimal, because you can easily tear through zombies even at the Expert level.







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But what about tanks? Oh man, let me tell you about the tanks. Tanks are sort of terrifying in Left 4 Dead. The music starts and you know you're in for some shit. You'd figure all lagged out, the tank wouldn't be nearly as terrifying. But you'd be wrong in thinking that.



If you've followed my advice and play using chainsaws, you'll have to get in super close to strike the Tank down with it. Which means you're at risk of getting Hulk-smashed and immediately knocked out. That Tank is a mean one on Expert. But you can't quite tell when he's about to get a hit in, because his lagged-out animations certainly won't be an accurate indicator. You get hit before you see yourself getting hit. So fighting a Tank becomes a game of guesswork, trying to identify when it's safe to go in for a slice before he can get a swing in. It goes: run in for a slice, run the fuck out, repeat. You're always just one fraction of a second away from getting hit, which, if that happens, you're likely to be left behind by your teammates. It's an unspoken rule that getting through Expert on a lagged-out, all chainsaws round of Left 4 Dead 2 necessitates that you don't linger around for fear of getting incapacitated by a nasty special infected. The adrenaline throughout fighting this lagged-out Tank is, as you might imagine, pumping vigorously.



A new, still incredibly fun way of playing Left 4 Dead 2 was born. And all because of one simple duplication glitch. That's the beauty of the unintended in video games: you can discover new ways of playing your favorite games. Whether that's a hidden corner, an unintended use for a grenade, or something that's a complete game-changer, it doesn't matter. Because it's fun to discover what you can and can't do in a virtual world that's effectively your playground.



***

Obviously some glitches are bad. They can ruin the experience. Old school Counter-Strike comes to mind, where players would bounce on each other's heads for an aerial view of the map where they were essentially untouchable. No one has fun with that (except maybe for the glitch-cheating player).



But sometimes glitches involve awesome discoveries. And that's exactly how Wreck-It Ralph portrays Vanellope in the film. She's misunderstood and mistreated. But when you finally understand what she can do within the bounds of reason, she's reasonably everyone's favorite character.


Kotaku

And Now I Need To See A Left 4 Dead 2-Themed Adventure Time Episode I feel we haven't hit our weekly quota of Things Tina Likes, so here's a mash-up image of Adventure Time and Left 4 Dead 2, which, yes, I still play. In between Halo 4.



Adventure time meets Left 4 Dead [nissemann123456789 via Insanely Gaming]


Kotaku

The Strange Beauty of Killing Zombies In Horrible Ways



Halloween is on its way, and while ghosts and ghouls may have been the undead horrors of decades past, here in 2012 it's all about the zombies and their ilk.



What better way to get in the mood for spooky doom than with this weirdly lovely, thoroughly instructive image from Left 4 Dead 2? See zombie, apply flamethrower. Now that's useful advice for the ages.



Click the image to expand to its full hi-res gory glory.



Open Up [Dead End Thrills]


Kotaku

I Hate That I'm Addicted To Boring Video Game ChallengesI'm having the same, recurring nightmare of late. It's one of those stupid ones where something that's normally inane and innocuous becomes unreasonably horrible.Here's what happens: I'm in Pandora, out on a mission—to kill someone, probably—when I notice something. Maybe it's a a box or a locker. And the second that I notice that, everything else fades away: there is only the lootable object.



Here's the problem: Borderlands 2 has a ridiculous number of lootable things. Like, they're just everywhere. And even if I loot them, next time I boot the game up, there they are again. Full. Waiting to be opened. So I do it again, and again, and again. It never ends.



Picture this: a frenzy with badasses flanking me left and right, friends down and needing reviving, and what is my dumb butt doing? Getting shot in the face while elbow deep in shit: bullymong scat is also lootable.



It didn't used to be like that. But then I took a look at Borderlands' challenges, which award you badass tokens that you can redeem for stat upgrades. One of those challenges is called "Open Pandora's Boxes," and it involves opening any and all lootable objects.



It's so simple, and I can get perks for doing it—so of course I indulge. Under normal circumstances, Borderland's challenges, like those in many games, are okay: they encourage you to step outside your comfort zone and try new things, or they reward you for something you already do. I can get behind the well-crafted challenges.



"Hurly Burly," for instance, requires me to shoot bullymong projectiles out of midair—it's not something I would seek to do on my own, and it's a difficult thing to do, so I appreciate it's inclusion. Games like Left 4 Dead 2 in particular have countless number of amazing achievements and challenges: CL0WND has you honk the noses of 10 clowns, which you do by meleeing, (silly but amusing!) and Chaos Generator requires you to have all of the generators running at once in "The Sacrifice" (extra challenge, because each generator gives you a wave of zombies!)



But why give me incentive to do something that's not fun or meaningful? It's one thing to open a chest with guns in it—who doesn't get a little wide-eyed and single-minded when they see a chest? Chests are great. I want to open chests. There might be awesome guns in there.



But why give me incentive to do something that's not fun or meaningful?

The only reason I open the toilets scattered around the game is because I need ammo: a necessity, but not something I enjoy doing necessarily. But the second you introduce an achievement or a challenge, everything changes—regardless of how enjoyable it actually is to do. I'll do it anyway—and I think game designers sometimes abuse this compulsion.



For example, there are countless games with achievements like "kill x number of enemies with y gun." The issue is that the reason I don't use the gun in the first place is because it was awful or because there's a better gun. But instead of giving me a gun that's fun to use, I get a challenge to use the gun instead. So I'll use it, but I'm not going to be happy about it.



Stop that, game designers. It's a shortcut. You get me to do what you want, but it's not because you designed something worthwhile. You know you've got something on your hands when the player gravitates to do something, to experiment, without being explicitly told to do so. Not that I'm saying that's easy to design or anything—if it was, I'm guessing that more games would achieve it!



It's not all mechanical stumbles—sometimes, the problems rewards pose are more ideological. Bulletstorm has a special system called "skillshots", which give you extra points depending on how creatively you kill your enemies. The points flash up on the screen, and the whole idea is to try to one-up yourself with more elaborate kills as you go along. It turns out that the love of points above all else can be betraying. Brendan Keogh puts the experience of playing Bulletstorm best when he says:




It's all good fun. It's all satisfying and violent and everything you want from a shooter. But then my partner walks into the room while I am playing and sees what I am doing. Or I write it out in an essay like I just did, and it feels kind of… wrong. Whereas most shooters attempt to justify the endless violence with some kind of framing narrative or an unredeemably evil enemy, Bulletstorm is more honest. It is a murder simulator, and it doesn't try to be anything else.




Similarly, I get uncomfortable thinking not so much about what the game has me do, but the way in which it has me do it: points. Points change things, give me incentive, yes—but more alarmingly, in this case, points help dehumanize what's happening on the screen all the more. In Brendan's case, being rewarded for killing creatively turns out to be revealing inasmuch as it is betraying: it forces him to wonder if he enjoys the murder and the mayhem after all.




Bulletstorm doesn't tell me that I should feel bad for what I do in violent videogames. On the contrary, it tells me without a flicker of irony or doubt that this is and should be enjoyable. Actually, that isn't quite accurate. Bulletstorm doesn't tell me anything; it forces me to admit that I enjoy this. It's a strange, non-judging passive-aggression. Oh, you like murdering people in gory ways just for more meaningless points? That's nice. Here is a guy you could decapitate for twenty-five points. You don't have to, but I think we both know you want to.




The game acknowledges that we like what it has us do, doesn't it? Maybe points have nothing to do with it. Or maybe points just end the charade and make it all blatant. Where does the sadism begin, organically with the player, or via the encouragement that the reward brings? Are we just kidding ourselves by trying to draw a distinction?



Reward with caution, game designers: challenges, achievements and the like change everything, but not always for the better.



Kotaku





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Video spoilers



...is pooping.



From one of my favorite YouTubers—and in the spirit of zombie week—comes this short and sweet clip of a very...unique encounter with Left 4 Dead 2's tank.



I never thought I'd feel bad for a zombie until now. There he was, minding his own business on a flushable porta potty when Coach decides to shoot him immediately after violating his privacy. Now, if he was reading a quantum physics book on the other hand...



Two in the Tank [YouTube]


...

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